500 Miles on my Cyber Truck. 400 of them towing a car. Do I need a weight distribution hitch?

Woodrick

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Id rather not have to hook up a weight distribution hitch. Towing so far has been great. Just not sure if highway patrol would have an issue with not using one on a technically only a half ton truck
For safe towing, it's not the highway patrol that I worry about, it's your own life.

In 99% of the situations, it may be that your rig is sufficient, but you only die once.

In the tow vehicle, weight distribution between the front and rear axles is important. with trailers, it is too common for the weight on the front axle to be significantly decreased. This causing steering issues. It's not uncommon to be going down the Interstate, someone in front of you stops quickly, you swerve to miss them, but then correct the swerve, only to have the trailer fling you off the Interstate, because you don't have enough down-force to steer.

The tongue weight should nominally be 10% of the trailer weight. 10,000 lb trailer (fully loaded) means 1,000 lb tongue weight. You also have to be careful that you don't have anything in the truck bed, because you will probably exceed rear axle weight limits if you do.

After hitching, the trailer should be level and the truck level as well (without the assistance of load levelling suspensions). This may mean, as shown in one of my videos, that your hitch rig may need height adjustment.

Like I said 99% of the time, things may work great. But it's the 1%...

  • Where you see the tandem trailer with dual flats or quad flats (overloaded trailer and/or old tires)
  • Trucks going down road with nose in air (too much tongue weight and no load balancing)
  • Rear tire blow out on tow vehicles (too much rear axle weight, load in bed AND trailer mis-balanced)

Just trying to keep this from happening
Tesla Cybertruck 500 Miles on my Cyber Truck. 400 of them towing a car. Do I need a weight distribution hitch? 1712065387431-ve
Tesla Cybertruck 500 Miles on my Cyber Truck. 400 of them towing a car. Do I need a weight distribution hitch? 1712065467782-kr
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acey

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Most of the miles on my CT have been with an enclosed car trailer with car inside.
My last truck was a Chevy 2500 Dually. I have to say, the CT tows great.

I want to dial in my setup and searched the interwebs but only finding contradicting information. Do I need a weight distribution hitch or not? I dont feel ant sense of the front end feeling light. Nor do I feel any sway. Im towing about 7500 lbs. Some say I need one. While some say the unibody construction wont allow a weight distir

I just want to make sure all the bases are covered incase of a towing mishap and some investigator tells me I should have been using a particular type of hitch.
IMG_0012.jpeg
How is the range towing that trailer?
 

SSonnentag

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How is the range towing that trailer?
I can answer that one just from the picture. Range is TERRIBLE. Sails are big and flat for a reason. :LOL:

My Diesel truck would drop from 20 mpg to 12 pulling that trailer at 65 mph.
An EV, being more efficient, would drop even more, probably dropping from 2.1 miles/kWh to ~1 mile/kWh.
 

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WD for Cybertruck is a great question to research about. I have the high end Hensley hitch that I use for my airstream. I want to know whether I need it for the CT. I’m aware of all the advantages of WD. I have heard that WD hitches can mess with the software. As the tongue weight changes constantly, WD is actually not recommended by some manufactures on some of these vehicles (for Example Range Rover). I think we need to check with Tesla or refer to manual. If WD doesn’t mess with CT’s software, it’s better to use one, especially if the tongue weight is cutting close to the limit (1100 lbs tongue weight for CT).
 
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WD for Cybertruck is a great question to research about. I have the high end Hensley hitch that I use for my airstream. I want to know whether I need it for the CT. I’m aware of all the advantages of WD. I have heard that WD hitches can mess with the software. As the tongue weight changes constantly, WD is actually not recommended by some manufactures on some of these vehicles (for Example Range Rover). I think we need to check with Tesla or refer to manual. If WD doesn’t mess with CT’s software, it’s better to use one, especially if the tongue weight is cutting close to the limit (1100 lbs tongue weight for CT).
This is exactly my concern. Ive towed many times with various vehicles. I had a specific question about using a WD with the Cybertruck but instead getting unrelated responses.
How is the range towing that trailer?
I looked up a lot of cybertruck towing videos prior to towing and saw towing range listed be between 95-120 miles with an open trailer and an RV. I am seeing much better range. Did some 100 mile round trips from a full charge (320 mile Range starting on indicator) which said 170 miles after my trip.

Seems to have gone much better than the online reviews
 


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In my opinion, I wouldn't mess with a WD hitch. FIrst off, we don't know if they are approved for use on the CT by Tesla. Most unibody trucks specifically state not to use WD hitches. Second, in all of the towing tests I've seen on YouTube, where the trailer loads are up near the rated CT towing capacity, there have been no indications of swaying or other control issues. So as long as the tongue weight is within CT specs, and the trailer weight is under the CT capacity, just tow. Of course, be sure your trailer load is properly balanced on its own axle(s), with 10-15% of the total trailer weight on the hitch while staying below the CT hitch limits.
 

Woodrick

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In my opinion, I wouldn't mess with a WD hitch. FIrst off, we don't know if they are approved for use on the CT by Tesla. Most unibody trucks specifically state not to use WD hitches. Second, in all of the towing tests I've seen on YouTube, where the trailer loads are up near the rated CT towing capacity, there have been no indications of swaying or other control issues. So as long as the tongue weight is within CT specs, and the trailer weight is under the CT capacity, just tow. Of course, be sure your trailer load is properly balanced on its own axle(s), with 10-15% of the total trailer weight on the hitch while staying below the CT hitch limits.
With the loaded trailer are the front and rear axle weights the same percentage as they were without the trailer?

Odds are that there is significantly more weight on the rear and less on the front. That creates control issues.

Get the truck weighed without the trailer, both front and rear axle weights, measure the front and rear fender levels.
Hitch up the trailer, fully loaded and weight the entire rig.
It's really simple to do and there are lots of scales that will do it for you, for free or a small charge.
 

Cyber Man

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With the loaded trailer are the front and rear axle weights the same percentage as they were without the trailer?

Odds are that there is significantly more weight on the rear and less on the front. That creates control issues.

Get the truck weighed without the trailer, both front and rear axle weights, measure the front and rear fender levels.
Hitch up the trailer, fully loaded and weight the entire rig.
It's really simple to do and there are lots of scales that will do it for you, for free or a small charge.
I hope someday Tesla adds live axle load information and warn users when loads exceeds safety. WDs are incredibly useful to balance axle loads and improves safety, but it’s important to know that when OEMs publish tow ratings, they do account for axle load bearing capacity without using WD hitch systems. So it’s important to stay within those specs. I hope we get an official answer from Tesla on whether WDs can be used with CT or not, including proprietary ProPride or Hensley hitches. It’s ok if they don’t recommend. We just need an official answer on whether they “can” be used. We need not speculate or debate the benefits of WDs. That’s not the point. The point is whether WDs are compatible with CT or not.
 
 




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