ModelAZ

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Tesla Claimed Cybertruck Could Pull “Near Infinite Mass” — What Does That Even Mean?

https://cleantechnica.com/2023/01/1...-near-infinite-mass-what-does-that-even-mean/


Screenshot 2023-01-20 at 11.07.13 AM.jpg



But Is It “Near Infinite?”
As Jason Torchinsky at The Autopian mentions, there is a way to calculate drawbar pulls based on the torque of the vehicle. If you choose a towing target with low rolling resistance, and use a lot of torque (something Cybertruck will have), the pulling capacity (not towing, but pulling) should be in the millions of pounds. So, yes, the numbers will be very big (once we have them).

But the problem with “near infinite” is that it’s a meaningless term. It’s not just vague, but literally meaningless. Mathematically speaking, something can either be infinite or not. If there’s too many to possibly ever count because you’d never get to the end (because there is no end), then it’s infinite. If it’s countable at all, even if it’s a really big number, then it’s finite. In other words, something is either infinite or it’s not, kind of like someone can either be pregnant or not pregnant. If a person was “near pregnant,” then they’re just not.

 

cvalue13

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If you choose a towing target with low rolling resistance, and use a lot of torque (something Cybertruck will have), the pulling capacity (not towing, but pulling) should be in the millions of pounds. So, yes, the numbers will be very big (once we have them).
with low rolling resistance, in 2019 Ford’s mule BEV prototype pulled >1M pounds of train



Was a silly stunt then, and versions of it remain silly. I guess these kinds of snake oil stunts (see CT “towing” battle with F150) are effective on someone, but to me they’re a turn-off.
 


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Tesla Claimed Cybertruck Could Pull “Near Infinite Mass” — What Does That Even Mean?

https://cleantechnica.com/2023/01/1...-near-infinite-mass-what-does-that-even-mean/


Screenshot 2023-01-20 at 11.07.13 AM.jpg



But Is It “Near Infinite?”
As Jason Torchinsky at The Autopian mentions, there is a way to calculate drawbar pulls based on the torque of the vehicle. If you choose a towing target with low rolling resistance, and use a lot of torque (something Cybertruck will have), the pulling capacity (not towing, but pulling) should be in the millions of pounds. So, yes, the numbers will be very big (once we have them).

But the problem with “near infinite” is that it’s a meaningless term. It’s not just vague, but literally meaningless. Mathematically speaking, something can either be infinite or not. If there’s too many to possibly ever count because you’d never get to the end (because there is no end), then it’s infinite. If it’s countable at all, even if it’s a really big number, then it’s finite. In other words, something is either infinite or it’s not, kind of like someone can either be pregnant or not pregnant. If a person was “near pregnant,” then they’re just not.
As a lab tech I have a singular issue with the last statement. I understand your point that "near infinite" is a stupid catch phrase. But, The railroad system may disagree with you. The persistence of an electric motor's torque is why our rail system uses diesel over electric. The diesel engine cannot stall like electric. So even though the mass is overwhelming, given time, the electric motors of a locomotive will overcome the inertia, and those motors are nowhere near as advanced as what Tesla has innovated. As for the Lab tech issue, a person can, actually, be near pregnant in many ways. My industry tests for gradients of pregnancy to understand how a pregnancy is progressing. There are ectopic pregnancies (non viable), spontaneous miscarriage, and many disorders that end a fetus before it has a chance. Yes, the person is pregnant technically, but the practicality of all-or-nothing is rediculous.
 

Diehard

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This almost sounds like part of a presidential debate:

- Would you please tell us how far you can tow?

- Of course, I can tow near infinite amount of weight in space.

- sir I just want to know how many stops I have to make and for how long to my vacation destination when I pull my 5000 lb trailer.

- You could tow near infinite number of trailers in space.


Trucks have had the ability to tow more than an average person need them to in the past. What else can it do that I don’t need it to do?

1674262837470.jpeg
 
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PES_CT

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As a lab tech I have a singular issue with the last statement. I understand your point that "near infinite" is a stupid catch phrase. But, The railroad system may disagree with you. The persistence of an electric motor's torque is why our rail system uses diesel over electric. The diesel engine cannot stall like electric. So even though the mass is overwhelming, given time, the electric motors of a locomotive will overcome the inertia, and those motors are nowhere near as advanced as what Tesla has innovated. As for the Lab tech issue, a person can, actually, be near pregnant in many ways. My industry tests for gradients of pregnancy to understand how a pregnancy is progressing. There are ectopic pregnancies (non viable), spontaneous miscarriage, and many disorders that end a fetus before it has a chance. Yes, the person is pregnant technically, but the practicality of all-or-nothing is ridiculous.
Google: "Diesel Locomotives use electricity to drive forward motion despite the name 'diesel'. A large diesel engine turns a shaft that drives a generator which makes electricity. This electrical energy powers large electric motors at the wheels called 'traction motors'."
 


Challeco

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Are you sure you read my response? My point was about the electric drive not the diesel.
 

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Google: "Diesel Locomotives use electricity to drive forward motion despite the name 'diesel'. A large diesel engine turns a shaft that drives a generator which makes electricity. This electrical energy powers large electric motors at the wheels called 'traction motors'."
I read Challecho's comment as understanding the concept of Diesel/Electric locomotives. Sure, although the "use diesel over electric" might sound like "use diesel INSTEAD of electric", the rest of his comment proves that he meant "uses diesel powered generators to provide electric current to electric motors driving the wheels. "Diesel over electric" is one way people often refer to diesel/electric locomotives.
 
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Rutrow

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The "Near infinite" pulling power of all electric vehicles is a feature of their ability to apply their full torque at zero RPMs. Years ago, Ford made a commercial showing their electric prototype truck pulling ONE MILLION POUNDS of F-150 laden train cars, along a level stretch of train track. This is more of a brilliant feature of trains than it was of the pickup truck's towing capacity. Solid metal train wheels, on solid metal, level, train tracks present as close to zero rolling resistance as there is. Another feature of train couplings is that they allow a locomotive (or pickup truck) to only have to get one train car moving at a time. There's a little slack in each coupling so the power gets the first car rolling, then that inertia helps get the next car moving, then those two car's momentum jerks the next car into motion, and so on... and so on... and so on...

It's the constant force of the electric motor, even before it has started to turn, that imparts the force that eventually overcomes the inertia of the first train car. With enough patience and VERY low rolling resistance, Tesla motors (and even less powerful ones) can get "near infinite" mass moving.

Now getting it stopped is another matter all together. 😬
 

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Electrons are very small mass and the magnetic field their tiny movement creates is very little but the magnetic wave moves at nearly the speed of light. That charge wave is nearly impossible to stop so saying that an electric motor can move near infinite mass is very accurate.
 

 
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