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from https://cleantechnica.com/2019/11/28/who-is-actually-going-to-buy-a-tesla-cybertruck/

Who Is *Actually* Going To Buy A Tesla Cybertruck?

November 28th, 2019

There’s been all kinds of discussion about how the Tesla Cybertruck compares to conventional pickup trucks, and whether pickup truck drivers will buy the Cybertruck. There’s also been tons of discussion about other types of vehicles it competes with and a diverse range of reasons someone might want this truly unique vehicle. But I like to do two things: 1) cut through fluff and get down to reality, which in this case means figuring out who will go all the way and purchase a Cybertruck (or more), 2) look at such topics as comprehensively as possible (sooner or later).

It seems that now is a good time to look at the various types of people who might actually buy a Cybertruck and for what reasons.

Robotaxi & RoboXYZ operators
— Rahul Sonnad of Tesla made a strong case for why the Cybertruck is the ultimate robotaxi. Short summary: it’s got a ton of cargo space, has seating for 6, is super durable, looks fine even if it does get dings and scratches, is bullet proof (to some degree), has great visibility, is very easy to spot, is a Tesla (many great networking and connectivity benefits). Aside from robotaxi service, the Cybertruck can be used in what I’m calling roboXYZ services — things like package delivery or shuttle services.

Oh yeah, note that if you put $100 in for a preorder now and select the Full Self Driving option, you lock in the $7,000 price for that. The price of Full Self Driving is expected to go up significantly, so locking in that presumably low price for just a $100 preorder deposit seems wise. That’s the core reason I put in $100 and may put in a couple hundred dollars more.

Campers (and will-be campers)
— I’m not a camper. I’m not a truck person. But the first reason I became attracted to the Cybertruck is that it looks like the ultimate camping vehicle and made me want to go camping! Being able to sleep in a climate controlled space if preferred (while out enjoying the wilderness otherwise), offering power outlets for certain electrically powered essentials, providing a beautiful view through the abundant glass, featuring Netflix and other home theater options, offering the best powertrain and body for off-road or at least rural use, and having enough space for all kinds of camping and living gear, there is nothing else like it. Plus, this looks cool:

Tesla-Cybertruck-Camping-e1574405837846.jpg



Blue-collar workers of all sorts
— Some pickup truck owners who use their trucks for actual blue-collar jobs have indicated they don’t think the Cybertruck is a good replacement for their work trucks. Others have exclaimed that there’s nothing so useful and that they enthusiastically put down a preorder for one or more. It seems to depend on both what a person needs and whether they think the many advantages about the Cybertruck beat downsides that stem from the unique design.

Farmers are probably the most obvious workers in this category. While some have indicated that they don’t think the Cybertruck cuts it for their needs, others have claimed the opposite. Here’s a comment from one CleanTechnica reader who is apparently a farmer: “I ordered the tri-motor Cybertruck with FSD for my small ranch. It far exceeds the capabilities of my Ram 1500. So yes, it can be used as a truck and I will definitely buy it. It will also replace my Subaru Forester that I used whenever a truck wasn’t needed, to save fuel.”

City/suburb SUV & pickup drivers
— Naturally (or unnaturally), many people buy a pickup truck or large SUV simply for its looks. Perhaps they use the trucks once in a blue moon, but it’s still important for them to stick to their cult. And whereas pickups and SUVs look like big, macho vehicles to many people, there is nothing so menacing and tough looking as the Cybertruck.

Soccer moms/dads
— Similar to the above, the point here is just that there are many parents who shuttle kids from place to place in what seem like usefully large vehicles, but none of them will be able to hold a candlelight to Mr. Cyber. Aside from the 6 seats, there’s the enormous cargo space, the expected durability, and the home theater system.

Techies & sci-fi fanatics
— Okay, let’s be frank, there are a lot of people who are into the Cybertruck just because of its sci-fi look and familiarity from many a movie or video game. Yes, for people who are not in that culture, the Cybertruck may look like a shocking ugly duckling, but for Halo gamers, it very well may look like the long-awaited perfect vehicle.

Greenies who want revenge
— I’m not sure if this is a big thing, but it’s got to be something. Prius buyers, many of whom have happily switched to Teslas, were the butt of many jokes for years. Tesla drivers occasionally get “ICE’d” by pickup truck drivers at Superchargers, and get rolled with coal. Non-Tesla EV drivers routinely get ICE’d at public charging stations by people who just don’t care about their needs. Some of these greenies are fed up. Having the street’s most intimidating and durable vehicle is quite appealing. No more getting pushed around, bullies, I’m Spider-Man! Will this actually compel some sales? Certainly! Remember, many consumer purchases, and definitely vehicle purchases, are guided heavily by emotions and identity. Related: LOL — Elon’s Tesla Cybertruck Just Turned Manly Man-Trucks Into Princess Wagons.

Hipsters/Millennials/Gen-Zers
— CleanTechnica contributor Frugal Moogal explained very well that the Cybertruck appears to appeal to younger generations much more than older generations for various reasons. My limited experience indicates the same. Perhaps it’s for some of the reasons noted above. Perhaps it’s other reasons related to generational change, culture, and inherently rebelling against your elders. Perhaps it’s simply about being open minded. Whatever it is, though, I think Millennials and Gen-Zers are much more likely to find the Cybertruck visually appealing and appealing as an all-around-utilitarian vehicle.

You may notice that the team that designed and developed the CYBRTRK is on the younger side of average human lifespans (see pic below). Perhaps they just decided to design something for their generation rather than for the neighborhood Boomer’s. (Side note: I find it interesting that, barely being a Millennial, I barely got around to putting my order in within one week of the reveal.) Of course, Elon, as a meme lord, is naturally hip with the young hipsters and has the perfect taste for this demographic.

a-cybertruck-team-franz-von-holzhausen-KYLE-scaled.jpg




But when it comes down to it …

Above are the various groups of people who might be strongly attracted to the Cybertruck (and Emma Watson), but as I already noted, many vehicle purchases are based on emotions — and aesthetics. Actually, I’ve seen it stated that there’s evidence people primarily choose their vehicles based on how they look. (I haven’t seen the actual research on this, but I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s true, or at least half true or one-third true.) The fact is, as much as we like to think of ourselves as a thoughtful, rational species, we often aren’t. So, when it comes down to it, I think there are a couple of things that will attract or repel buyers.

Primal appeal …

I think I explained this in decent depth and style in “LOL — Elon’s Tesla Cybertruck Just Turned Manly Man-Trucks Into Princess Wagons,” so I won’t go on and on about it here. The general point is that pickup trucks are typically marketed to buyers on how macho they are — how strong, tough, durable, able to drive through rivers, and able to climb mountains they are. Truck commercials are narrated by deep and scruffy voices. Muscular men are featured in the ads. Etc., etc. The Cybertruck takes macho, scruffy, tough, durable, long-lasting, intimidating to another level. Ford F-150s and Chevy Silverados now look like Barbie jeeps covered in nail polish. The Cybertruck is the real deal. It appeals to primal, “fight” (rather than “flight”) instincts. That tugs at the strings of many a consumer, including ones who have spent a few decades absorbing the message of truck commercials. It may also push some buyers away who identify more with non-macho adjectives.
 

Saskateam

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I resemble all of these groups, except Robotaxi. However I am a non conformist as I conform to many labels and not just one group. This will be my work and play truck. For camping, for getting kids to events, cruising the urban environment, then go cut wood in the forest to heat my house, and get manure for the garden. I will drive others crazy or envious with the truck and then laugh at the price of gas. I will off road at work and drive to the head office for meetings with the executive. I will go to car shows with it and maybe tow a 1947 Willy’s Truck to enter and preach about the need to switch to electric transportation. I am a power lineman who has solar on my house. This truck applies to all of me. Oh and I am a tech/sci-fi loving millennial
 

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If my minivan could tow 8,000 lbs, I'd stick with it. But since I need a truck, Cybrtrk it is.

I'm definitely no longer part of any 'younger generation'. :) I know marketing people think they have to determine demographics and target audiences. I think marketing is B.S.
 

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Well, I will buy a Cybertruck. It surprisingly fits my needs. To date I fit no profile listed. I kind of like that. It almost defines why I like the design.
So I'm going to go to work, pull a boat on the weekends, go exploring (within the range), or maybe even plan a cross-country trip and see how that works with charging stations. I've never owned a battery powered vehicle, but I'm up for the challenge.....and change.
I just hope this project moves to completion. It would be a great topic of local discussion with the traditional truck crowd.
 

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Interesting read. While watching the live stream, when it was revealed, I truly thought "WOW, that's ugly!"; However, when Elon put up the statistics of what it can do, I immediately crossed off the first two, but my eyes lit up when he indicated the tri-motor's statistics. Before this I was considering a three-quarter ton RAM Diesel to be my next, and most likely last vehicle. I thought about it for almost a full day before deciding to put the measly $100 into the hat. My plan is to use it mostly for daily driving, but I'm getting close to that "retirement" age and it will need to be able to pull a 5th wheel toy-hauler. It would be nice if they offered a towing package; where it's already set up with a receiver and/or 5th wheel towing capabilities. My mind is changing from "WOW, that's ugly!" to "WOW, that's nice!".
 

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People who tow boats.
 

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I'm replacing my Ford F150 Platinum 4X4 6.5ft bed with the Cybertruck TriMotor. I want to become gasoline-free in the next 2 years, this truck along with Rivian's R1T fits my goal. Both are made in USA and from environmentally conscious companies. I will support them before any offshore or legacy auto manufacturers...
 

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I am getting one and am a boat owner. I also own rental property and maintain some of it myself so always hauling tools and general items. It will be my second car for now as i wanted a truck to be a "toy" extra car. This will fit both. I am currently using my Jeep Wangler unlimited in this capacity.
 

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Two boats stored 0.5 miles from the ramp, put in in the spring, take out in the fall comes out to 2*.5*2 = 2 miles of boat towing per year. Yep, I think that's enough of a justification for me.
 

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Definitely, tri motor, FSD, / solar option when available
 

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I'll be replacing my VW Atlas. I needed something that seats at least 6 and that is expansive on the inside. My Atlas seats 7, so I'll be losing one seat, but will be gaining a TON of cargo space.

Yes, I'm a millennial, but I loathe this association. I most fit in with the "techie" group. I did have a Prius before the kids came along, and I LOVED the pure electric driving under 30. I'm looking forward to the driving all-electric experience.

Plus, to be honest, this is the first electric vehicle that is within my price range that isn't a tiny car. With a family, a Model 3 would have been a bit of a stretch and the S/X are out of my price range. I don't need a truck, but I certainly won't mind it.
 

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I'm not really in the demographic above either. I'm a hardcore Hot Rod guy. I built everything pictured below from the ground up. I'm a hardcore Chevy guy, I love horsepower and the rumble of a V8, I even named my 20 month old newborn Holden, if any of you know how that is connected. I'm sick and tired of ALL the manufacturers following each other and making very minimal changes to cars and trucks from year to year. Back in the 80's I was looking forward to having these futuristic looking cars around the year 2000. I sent to Detroit auto show every year to see the concepts. Here we are 2020 and the cars and trucks have changed minimally in the last 30 years. I don't need a new car or truck, I just leased a 2018 Traverse and bought a Ford Transit. I'm buying a Cybertruck because it's a wild change. I had plans of buying a C8 Corvette but now I'm buying this. It will have the performance of the Vette and haul all the shit I need to and be able to strap a car seat in the back seat for my little one. Also I planned on buying a Model 3 back in 2018 when my wife was looking for a new car but the wait time was too long and we wanted a new car. So by the time these trucks start to ship, my lease on my 2018 Traverse will be up and my wife will be driving the Cybertruck daily back and forth to work and it will be my play toy when she isn't playing in it.

20130714_111112_zpsfb652feb.jpg


IMAG1719.jpg


Screenshot_20191209-164723_Gallery.jpg
 

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Two boats stored 0.5 miles from the ramp, put in in the spring, take out in the fall comes out to 2*.5*2 = 2 miles of boat towing per year. Yep, I think that's enough of a justification for me.
I like your math. :)
 

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from https://cleantechnica.com/2019/11/28/who-is-actually-going-to-buy-a-tesla-cybertruck/

Who Is *Actually* Going To Buy A Tesla Cybertruck?

November 28th, 2019

There’s been all kinds of discussion about how the Tesla Cybertruck compares to conventional pickup trucks, and whether pickup truck drivers will buy the Cybertruck. There’s also been tons of discussion about other types of vehicles it competes with and a diverse range of reasons someone might want this truly unique vehicle. But I like to do two things: 1) cut through fluff and get down to reality, which in this case means figuring out who will go all the way and purchase a Cybertruck (or more), 2) look at such topics as comprehensively as possible (sooner or later).

It seems that now is a good time to look at the various types of people who might actually buy a Cybertruck and for what reasons.

Robotaxi & RoboXYZ operators
— Rahul Sonnad of Tesla made a strong case for why the Cybertruck is the ultimate robotaxi. Short summary: it’s got a ton of cargo space, has seating for 6, is super durable, looks fine even if it does get dings and scratches, is bullet proof (to some degree), has great visibility, is very easy to spot, is a Tesla (many great networking and connectivity benefits). Aside from robotaxi service, the Cybertruck can be used in what I’m calling roboXYZ services — things like package delivery or shuttle services.

Oh yeah, note that if you put $100 in for a preorder now and select the Full Self Driving option, you lock in the $7,000 price for that. The price of Full Self Driving is expected to go up significantly, so locking in that presumably low price for just a $100 preorder deposit seems wise. That’s the core reason I put in $100 and may put in a couple hundred dollars more.

Campers (and will-be campers)
— I’m not a camper. I’m not a truck person. But the first reason I became attracted to the Cybertruck is that it looks like the ultimate camping vehicle and made me want to go camping! Being able to sleep in a climate controlled space if preferred (while out enjoying the wilderness otherwise), offering power outlets for certain electrically powered essentials, providing a beautiful view through the abundant glass, featuring Netflix and other home theater options, offering the best powertrain and body for off-road or at least rural use, and having enough space for all kinds of camping and living gear, there is nothing else like it. Plus, this looks cool:

Tesla-Cybertruck-Camping-e1574405837846.jpg



Blue-collar workers of all sorts
— Some pickup truck owners who use their trucks for actual blue-collar jobs have indicated they don’t think the Cybertruck is a good replacement for their work trucks. Others have exclaimed that there’s nothing so useful and that they enthusiastically put down a preorder for one or more. It seems to depend on both what a person needs and whether they think the many advantages about the Cybertruck beat downsides that stem from the unique design.

Farmers are probably the most obvious workers in this category. While some have indicated that they don’t think the Cybertruck cuts it for their needs, others have claimed the opposite. Here’s a comment from one CleanTechnica reader who is apparently a farmer: “I ordered the tri-motor Cybertruck with FSD for my small ranch. It far exceeds the capabilities of my Ram 1500. So yes, it can be used as a truck and I will definitely buy it. It will also replace my Subaru Forester that I used whenever a truck wasn’t needed, to save fuel.”

City/suburb SUV & pickup drivers
— Naturally (or unnaturally), many people buy a pickup truck or large SUV simply for its looks. Perhaps they use the trucks once in a blue moon, but it’s still important for them to stick to their cult. And whereas pickups and SUVs look like big, macho vehicles to many people, there is nothing so menacing and tough looking as the Cybertruck.

Soccer moms/dads
— Similar to the above, the point here is just that there are many parents who shuttle kids from place to place in what seem like usefully large vehicles, but none of them will be able to hold a candlelight to Mr. Cyber. Aside from the 6 seats, there’s the enormous cargo space, the expected durability, and the home theater system.

Techies & sci-fi fanatics
— Okay, let’s be frank, there are a lot of people who are into the Cybertruck just because of its sci-fi look and familiarity from many a movie or video game. Yes, for people who are not in that culture, the Cybertruck may look like a shocking ugly duckling, but for Halo gamers, it very well may look like the long-awaited perfect vehicle.

Greenies who want revenge
— I’m not sure if this is a big thing, but it’s got to be something. Prius buyers, many of whom have happily switched to Teslas, were the butt of many jokes for years. Tesla drivers occasionally get “ICE’d” by pickup truck drivers at Superchargers, and get rolled with coal. Non-Tesla EV drivers routinely get ICE’d at public charging stations by people who just don’t care about their needs. Some of these greenies are fed up. Having the street’s most intimidating and durable vehicle is quite appealing. No more getting pushed around, bullies, I’m Spider-Man! Will this actually compel some sales? Certainly! Remember, many consumer purchases, and definitely vehicle purchases, are guided heavily by emotions and identity. Related: LOL — Elon’s Tesla Cybertruck Just Turned Manly Man-Trucks Into Princess Wagons.

Hipsters/Millennials/Gen-Zers
— CleanTechnica contributor Frugal Moogal explained very well that the Cybertruck appears to appeal to younger generations much more than older generations for various reasons. My limited experience indicates the same. Perhaps it’s for some of the reasons noted above. Perhaps it’s other reasons related to generational change, culture, and inherently rebelling against your elders. Perhaps it’s simply about being open minded. Whatever it is, though, I think Millennials and Gen-Zers are much more likely to find the Cybertruck visually appealing and appealing as an all-around-utilitarian vehicle.

You may notice that the team that designed and developed the CYBRTRK is on the younger side of average human lifespans (see pic below). Perhaps they just decided to design something for their generation rather than for the neighborhood Boomer’s. (Side note: I find it interesting that, barely being a Millennial, I barely got around to putting my order in within one week of the reveal.) Of course, Elon, as a meme lord, is naturally hip with the young hipsters and has the perfect taste for this demographic.

a-cybertruck-team-franz-von-holzhausen-KYLE-scaled.jpg




But when it comes down to it …

Above are the various groups of people who might be strongly attracted to the Cybertruck (and Emma Watson), but as I already noted, many vehicle purchases are based on emotions — and aesthetics. Actually, I’ve seen it stated that there’s evidence people primarily choose their vehicles based on how they look. (I haven’t seen the actual research on this, but I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s true, or at least half true or one-third true.) The fact is, as much as we like to think of ourselves as a thoughtful, rational species, we often aren’t. So, when it comes down to it, I think there are a couple of things that will attract or repel buyers.

Primal appeal …

I think I explained this in decent depth and style in “LOL — Elon’s Tesla Cybertruck Just Turned Manly Man-Trucks Into Princess Wagons,” so I won’t go on and on about it here. The general point is that pickup trucks are typically marketed to buyers on how macho they are — how strong, tough, durable, able to drive through rivers, and able to climb mountains they are. Truck commercials are narrated by deep and scruffy voices. Muscular men are featured in the ads. Etc., etc. The Cybertruck takes macho, scruffy, tough, durable, long-lasting, intimidating to another level. Ford F-150s and Chevy Silverados now look like Barbie jeeps covered in nail polish. The Cybertruck is the real deal. It appeals to primal, “fight” (rather than “flight”) instincts. That tugs at the strings of many a consumer, including ones who have spent a few decades absorbing the message of truck commercials. It may also push some buyers away who identify more with non-macho adjectives.
I'm a plumber, ATM I drive a 1997 aluminium body step van set up to carry tools and materials. I like this truck, aluminium body trucks don't rust out, 350 gas motor has plenty of power, lots of room, you can stand in the van, 8 x 12 cargo area set up with drawers and interior pipe racks, everything is inside the truck, out of sight is the best way to control theft, step bumper on the back. Set up with three seats in the front, two are suppression seats. Down sides are noise, no AC, the windows and locks are weak, poor mileage ( about 10 MPG ), it's weak in the wind, drives like a pig, it cost a lot in fuel and repairs to keep it going, and it's old.

For years I've been joking Elon Musk should make a Tesla aluminum body step van. While the Cyber Trunk is not the step van it can pull a trailer. I could set up 6 x 12 trailer to carry tools and materials, and use the bed of the truck for tools and some materials for smaller jobs. Basically a service truck that can tow a trailer to a job and park it. The roll up door on the back and the drop down ramp is good for walking into the bed, set the back up with light weight racks and bins, carry short pieces of pipe inside the bed for small jobs. It could work as well as a conventional pickup truck, even better for people that just carry tools and very small parts and have materials delivered to the job. The bed closes to protect your tools and materials.

Stainless steel doesn't rust out, the top two models have all wheel drive, good for areas with ice. snow, and salt. The ability to power and charge tools is a big plus, you don't need a generator.

The questions I have are do the mileage numbers take into account payload, it can tow up to 10,000 lbs, but how far?

How about a Tesla cargo trailer with a Tesla roof that charges the car while construction workers work all day? Made from the same stainless steel as the car, smart GPS tracker built right in so the car always knows where the trailer is to control trailer theft.

So yeah I would buy one, out of the box just having a lettered Cyber truck would make people look and take notice. Climate change and all of that, and I do that that seriously, I live on the east coast and climate change is already affecting me. In forty years it's going to affect my children even more, and we have to act now ( within eight years ) to head that off.

I could buy the middle of the line cyber truck and keep the old step van, carry the tools in the cyber truck and just have materials on the old step van and park it on the job and lock it up, maybe take the battery out.

Best of both worlds, get rid of the old rusting out mini van I have as the family car and replace it with the cyber truck and claim a mileage deduction ( .59 a mile ) or buy it as a company vehicle and work it the other way.
 

Nightf0rge

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Won't even post link but less hostile headline then one I saw pop up this morning: For a traffic cone? (Thought that was cool) Seriously....
"Elon's Cybertruck demolishes part of LA"
 

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