Mini2nut

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I found a great Cybertruck video that shows the complexity of the SBW system. The decision to implement SBW in the Cybertruck was not made for cost cutting reasons.

I read something about a current recall regarding the SBW system on the Tesla Cybertruck. It’s delaying some members from taking delivery.

The amount of part numbers is rather shocking when compared to a conventional steering system. Worth the cost? Owners say it’s a game changer on a pickup. The video also shows the Cybertruck’s 48v battery, cross car beam, charging cables, etc.

Sponsored

 
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g7bupw9z

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This video is about comparing a traditional steering system with Tesla's
  • steer by wire
  • 12v, 16v & 48v auxiliary batteries
  • cross car beams
  • aluminum charging wires
  • air suspension tanks.
In the video, Terry Wiychowski, the president of Caresoft, shows John McElroy, an automotive expert, two different steering systems. The first system is a traditional steering system from a Chevy Silverado. This system uses a steering wheel, column, rack, and motor to turn the wheels. The second system is a steer-by-wire system from a Tesla Cybertruck. In a steer-by-wire system, the steering wheel is connected to a sensor that detects how much the driver is turning the wheel. This signal is then sent to a computer, which tells a motor to turn the wheels.

The video also discusses some of the challenges of designing a steer-by-wire system. For example, the system needs to be calibrated so that it provides the driver with the correct amount of feedback. Additionally, the system needs to be waterproof in case the car is driven through water.

Tesla vehicles are head-turners for sure. We all know about the sleek aesthetics, the intuitive user experience, and the constant innovation through over-the-air updates. But there's a hidden world beneath the beautiful shell: Tesla's structural and construction processes. Here's why this might be the most underrated aspect of a Tesla:
  • Lighter, Stronger: Traditional car bodies rely on a complex web of steel beams and components. Tesla, however, utilizes a process called gigacasting. This allows them to create large, single-piece castings from aluminum. The benefit? Incredible strength with significantly less weight. Think of it as a lightweight skeleton that provides superior rigidity.
  • Fewer Parts, More Efficiency: Gigacasting also means fewer parts and welds. This translates to a more streamlined production process, but more importantly, a stronger, more reliable car. Less welding means less chance of weak points and a more uniform structure.
  • A Battery Advantage: The single-piece casting also integrates the battery pack into the chassis itself. This creates a structural component, not just a power source. The result? A stiffer car with a lower center of gravity, leading to better handling and potentially even more range.
Tesla's approach to car building is revolutionary. It's not just about the look and feel; it's about crafting a car from the inside out to be lighter, stronger, and ultimately, a safer driving experience. So next time you see a Tesla, remember, it's not just a pretty face – it's a technological marvel under the hood.
 
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Mini2nut

Mini2nut

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Great question. I think we will see that question answered in future Monro/Autoline Cybertruck tear downs.
 


HaulingAss

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Sorry couldn't watch it after the guest started poo-pooing the whole Covid thing in my eyes. Sorry, my Mom died of Covid.
I'm not sure what video you were watching, but there was no poo-pooing of COVID in the video I watched!
 

mhaze

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The spirit of the Exo Skeleton lives on, even after the new powerful Force Shields are turned off.

Just quietly creep up on a Cybertruck at night, best is on a full moon night.

See the faint glow all around?
 

Tinker71

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This is why the CT took 4 years. Steer by wire. I am still waiting for the increase turning angle on the rear stering.
 

WHIZZARD OF OZ

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I'm sure even Tesla has one or two 'Exosekeltons' in the Closet
 

HaulingAss

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I'm sure even Tesla has one or two 'Exosekeltons' in the Closet
I've got one in my driveway. An exoskeleton made by Tesla. On Friday, my wife and I were out eating dinner. Preparing to leave, there was a father and two of his sons checking out my Cybertruck. The dad asked me how I liked it and I said it was amazing. I answered a few questions, showed them the tonneau cover in operation and told his kids they could kick the doors as hard as they wanted.

For whatever reason, they were not kicking very hard. I said, "No, like this" and proceeded to kick it as hard as I thought I could with the hard rubber toe of my low cut approach "boots" without causing damage to my toe. I nailed the center of the door with a sharp kick and it didn't even leave a mark except for removing a bit of the dried mud that was on there from an off-road excursion. After talking a bit more, they walked to get in the Rivian R1S parked nearby.

The dad turned and said, "Please don't try kicking my Rivian like that!". Yes, the exoskeleton is real. People just want to try to take the shine off the superiority of the Cybertruck buy claiming it's not a "true" exoskeleton. They want to confuse reality with an argument about terminology.
 


g7bupw9z

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They discovered and perfected the gigacasting process.
You know, that's a great question. From what I've gathered, the Tesla team didn't abandon the Cybertruck's iconic exoskeleton design - they just found an even more innovative way to bring it to life. The original idea might have involved a more traditional exoskeleton structure, but as Tesla developed their gigacasting process, it kind of changed the game.

Apparently, they've been hard at work perfecting the gigacasting process, which allows them to cast large, complex parts in a single piece. This breakthrough manufacturing technique enables them to create the Cybertruck's signature exoskeleton shell as a single, seamless unit.

Think about it - no more tedious assembly of multiple components, no more potential weak points or failure modes. Just one ultra-strong, monolithic structure that forms the foundation of the Cybertruck. It's engineering elegance at its finest.

By leveraging gigacasting, Tesla has been able to not only preserve the Cybertruck's bold, angular exoskeleton design, but also make it even more robust and durable. Imagine the kind of crash protection and structural integrity you get from a single-piece exoskeleton cast in high-strength alloy. It's truly next-level stuff.

And the best part? This gigacasting process doesn't just benefit the Cybertruck - it's a manufacturing innovation that can be applied across Tesla's entire vehicle lineup. So we're likely to see the ripple effects of this technology throughout the entire Tesla ecosystem.

So in short, the exoskeleton is alive and well on the Cybertruck, just elevated to an even higher level of engineering excellence thanks to Tesla's mastery of gigacasting. It's one more example of how this company continues to push the boundaries of what's possible in the automotive world.
 
 




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