Can I be able to do snow plowing with a Cybertruck Frame? I live in Quebec, Canada

Richard V.

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HaulingAss

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Ref: Snow plowing | Tesla Cybertruck Forum & Owners Club - News & Discussions - Cybertruckownersclub.com

With no main frame can it be done?

Yes, that is what is keeping me up at night. I had a good nap in the afternoon :) That means I am now able to relax with the Cybertruck club if all is ok.

Cheers!
Anything can be done. But, unless Tesla sees fit to engineer attachment points into the Cybertruck I'm going to venture that it will likely take some extensive engineering and adaption work to fit a snowplow. Wet snow is surprising in it's ability to be like hitting a brick wall. When the snowplow is removed, any re-enforcement that has been added on will reduce crash safety so it would be best to design the snowplow mounting points to be removeable as well. It might be best to continue plowing with a more suitable body on frame truck if Tesla doesn't engineer plow mounting points into the Cybertruck (and I would be surprised if they did since less than 1% of all trucks out there are used for plowing snow).
 
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Richard V.

Richard V.

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Anything can be done. But, unless Tesla sees fit to engineer attachment points into the Cybertruck I'm going to venture that it will likely take some extensive engineering and adaption work to fit a snowplow. Wet snow is surprising in it's ability to be like hitting a brick wall. When the snowplow is removed, any re-enforcement that has been added on will reduce crash safety so it would be best to design the snowplow mounting points to be removeable as well. It might be best to continue plowing with a more suitable body on frame truck if Tesla doesn't engineer plow mounting points into the Cybertruck (and I would be surprised if they did since less than 1% off all trucks out there are used for plowing snow).
You might be surprised about the famous 1% :cool:. What about other applications like farming or something else a "real" truck would need to do...
Do not take me wrong, I do like the idea of the Cybertruck.
 
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rr6013

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Anything can be done. But, unless Tesla sees fit to engineer attachment points into the Cybertruck I'm going to venture that it will likely take some extensive engineering and adaption work to fit a snowplow. Wet snow is surprising in it's ability to be like hitting a brick wall. When the snowplow is removed, any re-enforcement that has been added on will reduce crash safety so it would be best to design the snowplow mounting points to be removeable as well. It might be best to continue plowing with a more suitable body on frame truck if Tesla doesn't engineer plow mounting points into the Cybertruck (and I would be surprised if they did since less than 1% off all trucks out there are used for plowing snow).
This pinnacle application is a lower threshold than presumed. Yes plowing beats the hell out of trucks. But its your truck! Impact forces are identical to and aligned on the bottom control arm point of attachment to the truck. Cybertruck front alloy casting must absorb all forces.

Cybertruck‘s highest hurdle will be engineered changes to its aluminum upper and lower A-arms to carry plow weight raised. Carry weight overburdens front suspension. Best envision a Plow Option. What good’s a truck that won’t plow?

Cybertruck 220v onboard begs all kinds of applications for third party attachments that gentleman farmers, contractors and industrial people will expect dual-use was intentional by design.
 

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I tried plowing snow here in Alabama once......tore up a set of double bottom plows when they dug into the asphalt.
 

HaulingAss

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You might be surprised about the famous 1% :cool:. What about other applications like farming or something else a "real" truck would need to do...
Do not take me wrong, I do like the idea of the Cybertruck.
It sounds like you are saying you believe more than 1% of all pick-up trucks have been outfitted with snow plows at one point in time or another. If so, that's incorrect for all pickups and even more incorrect if you limit it to the class of pickups that Cybertruck competes with, 1/2 ton pickups. As a percentage, snow plows are fitted to more 3/4 and 1 ton trucks than 1/2 ton trucks and, taken all together, it's certainly less than 1%.

I get that you might want to plow with a Cybertruck, (the cost savings would be considerable) but omitting factory tow points will not limit sales of Cybertrucks for many years to come. My best guess is that Tesla might add plow attachment points around 5-7 years after the initial release. It will make a great plow vehicle in so many ways once it has plow attachments from the factory. Having it custom engineered (properly) will not be a small task, nor will it be as elegant as the eventual factory solution. I give it less than 15% chance of being released with plow attachment points. And this makes sense once it's considered that the initial release is not fighting for maximum market share, it will sell as fast as they can crank them out whether it has plow attachment points or not.
 
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It sounds like you are saying you believe more than 1% of all pick-up trucks have been outfitted with snow plows at one point in time or another.
He is Canadian. Things are … different… up there.

I think they use the snow plough to clear the ice for street hockey games.

Which brings up an interesting question. How long before someone sinks a Cybertruck driving on ice?
 

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Should we have a pool on the date/time of the first totaled Cybertruck?

Seems like bad karma tbh
With the performance the tri motor has, it seems inevitable something will happen rather quickly (Pun intended there).

I scared the crap out of myself in my Model Y showing off to a buddy. The CT3 is a whole other class of crazy if you start playing with accelleration.
 

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With the performance the tri motor has, it seems inevitable something will happen rather quickly (Pun intended there).

I scared the crap out of myself in my Model Y showing off to a buddy. The CT3 is a whole other class of crazy if you start playing with accelleration.
I had a 2005 Jeep Grand Cherokee with the 5.7L Hemi V8. It had amazing power and acceleration... At least I thought it did, until I just looked it up and it's 0-60 time is 6.7 seconds. What I thought was impressive is now embarrassing.
 
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