Changing tires without a jack or lift

Mr.Dee

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Assuming the user had independent control of the adaptive suspension, it's theoretically possible to remove a wheel and tire from the Cybertruck without the use of a jack or lift.

The stressed skin creates a much larger net section (inertia) than what is possible with a typical truck frame. This would result in less deflection from corner to corner, allowing the truck to lower the suspension in one corner, lifting that tire off the ground with much less deflection than a traditional body-on-frame. The distributed mass of the battery assures a similar loading on all four corners, making it possible to change all 4 wheels, one at time, without the use of any type of lifting mechanism.

At first glance it sounds like a simple party trick but, in reality, it could be a big game changer for the DIY or off-roader crowd.
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alan auerbach

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Assuming the user had independent control of the adaptive suspension, it's theoretically possible to remove a wheel and tire from the Cybertruck without the use of a jack or lift.

The stressed skin creates a much larger net section (inertia) than what is possible with a typical truck frame. This would result in less deflection from corner to corner, allowing the truck to lower the suspension in one corner, lifting that tire off the ground with much less deflection than a traditional body-on-frame. The distributed mass of the battery assures a similar loading on all four corners, making it possible to change all 4 wheels, one at time, without the use of any type of lifting mechanism.

At first glance it sounds like a simple party trick but, in reality, it could be a big game changer for the DIY or off-roader crowd.
My 1960s Citroen did that. Set the control to raise it full, put a strut under the side with the bad tire, lower it full. Both wheels on the strut-side stay off the ground. You'd then wrench the bolt. (Not bolts -- there was one per wheel.)
 

gphenix

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My 1960s Citroen did that. Set the control to raise it full, put a strut under the side with the bad tire, lower it full. Both wheels on the strut-side stay off the ground. You'd then wrench the bolt. (Not bolts -- there was one per wheel.)
Ah, yes and with the on board air compressor a torque wrench with a limit to stop at the right torque.
 

Archer

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Assuming you're somewhere level enough, the ground is firm enough, etc.

But yes.

-Crissa
Practically speaking... terrain that is not level would not be an issue and may actually make it easier to change a tire in some situations.
 
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