Charging new CTs?

Diehard

Well-known member
First Name
D
Joined
Dec 5, 2020
Messages
1,248
Reaction score
2,317
Location
U.S.A.
Vehicles
Olds Aurora V8, Saturn Sky redline, Frontier, CT2
Country flag
As I was watching the construction site charging stations at the parking lot outside being built, it made me wonder when Y and CT are at full production and employees charging outside, how can grid handle charging every new CT and Y? Do the battery packs get charged to 50% when they are assembled somewhere else and shipped hot to be installed or they are installed empty and once vehicle is complete, they get charged to 10%, 50%, 90%. …. ? Anyone knows how this works for current production lines?
Advertisement

 

Throwcomputer

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 9, 2021
Messages
235
Reaction score
370
Location
Staten Island, NY
Vehicles
07 Ridgeline, 05 Stella x2, Vespa P200, P125, V100
Occupation
TV & Film
Country flag
I am imagining the grid there can handle whatever they need to do. And that probably involves charging the packs up to a certain point after assembly prior to installation into chassis in order to run qc checks on each pack to make sure that each one that leaves the line is good. Then once the vehicle is done, they charge in their temp storage lot on slimmed down chargers prior to loading on trucks for end delivery.

If you watch drone video of their fremont factory you see they have them lined up for each truck in prep for loading and delivery. I've been watching the texas drone footage waiting to see where they end up building a giant lot for temp storage and delivery truck load prep. I'm guessing it will be where the construction parking lot is currently. Or maybe that new lot squished between the giga press building and the entrance road (although I can't see them storing new vehicles so close to the entrance road, and that lot currently does not have the appropriate sized parking lanes/layout for truck load prep).
 

Crissa

Well-known member
First Name
Crissa
Joined
Jul 8, 2020
Messages
6,850
Reaction score
9,319
Location
Santa Cruz
Vehicles
2014 Zero S, 2013 Mazda 3
Country flag
The packs have to be charged, as the cell production has several validation steps where you charge and discharge them.

At GigaNevada, they planned to use solar, but as they built, the amount of geothermal available plus the solar efficiency increases on the market meant they didn't need as many solar cells on roof as they planned.

-Crissa
 

SwampNut

Well-known member
First Name
Carlos
Joined
Jul 26, 2021
Messages
288
Reaction score
319
Location
Peoria, AZ
Vehicles
Tesla M3LR, Gladiator Rubicon
Occupation
Geek
Country flag
The general industry norm is to ship lithium batteries at 70%. I don't know what Tesla does. For example I just got a couple of quadcopters and all the batteries arrived between 67% and 72%.
 

CyberGus

Well-known member
First Name
Gus
Joined
May 22, 2021
Messages
488
Reaction score
1,356
Location
Austin, TX
Vehicles
1981 DeLorean, 2022 Cybertruck
Occupation
IT Specialist
Country flag
Newly-manufactured cells must be conditioned with charge-discharge cycles. Similarly, the assembled packs go through QC checks.

However, I would think that everything would be kept at a low SoC until assembly was complete, for safety reasons.
 

Ogre

Well-known member
First Name
Dennis
Joined
Jul 3, 2021
Messages
3,095
Reaction score
6,117
Location
Ogregon
Vehicles
Model Y
Country flag
When I got my Model Y it was about 50% state of charge. I think a lot of times they are topped off at the service center though.
 

chalupacabre

Well-known member
First Name
chalupacabre
Joined
Jul 28, 2020
Messages
50
Reaction score
42
Location
Houston
Vehicles
2019 T3LR/DM
Occupation
vetter
Country flag
Texas is the largest electric wind generating state in the USA, so night time capacity will be sufficient when it doesn't freeze. Texas crude and natural gas (lng) production is mostly exported.
 

ReddykwRun

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 8, 2019
Messages
544
Reaction score
628
Location
Baldwin Co. Alabama
Vehicles
Tri-motor, tricked out
Occupation
Retired Military and working on 2nd Ret.
Well, they are right across the river from a power generation plant, maybe they get a discount.....
 

firsttruck

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 25, 2020
Messages
925
Reaction score
1,150
Location
mx
Vehicles
none
Country flag
Texas is the largest electric wind generating state in the USA, so night time capacity will be sufficient when it doesn't freeze. Texas crude and natural gas (lng) production is mostly exported.
Properly designed wind turbines can work in freezing weather. The models used in Northern parts of U.S., Northern Europe, even the North Sea work fine.

The problem is the Texas wind farm owners did not want to spend the extra money for better weatherization.

Also the nuclear power plant and coal power plants in Texas failed in the freezing weather too because again the owners did not want to spend the extra money for better weatherization.
 

Ogre

Well-known member
First Name
Dennis
Joined
Jul 3, 2021
Messages
3,095
Reaction score
6,117
Location
Ogregon
Vehicles
Model Y
Country flag
I had a weird thought. I doubt it will ever come to fruition, but it’s a thought.

Imagine row after row of Cybertruck rolled out of Texas. Only instead of being in a flat, empty parking lot, each one of them is plugged in while it is waiting for it’s transport to arrive. Only they aren’t just sucking up power, Tesla quietly adds them all to their virtual power plant.

Overnight, Tesla could make one of the largest power storage projects in the US. Just using idle trucks waiting for delivery.
1637641593467.png


Probably not a thing… interesting thought experiment though. That’s a lot of untapped storage.
 
OP
OP
Diehard

Diehard

Well-known member
First Name
D
Joined
Dec 5, 2020
Messages
1,248
Reaction score
2,317
Location
U.S.A.
Vehicles
Olds Aurora V8, Saturn Sky redline, Frontier, CT2
Country flag
I had a weird thought. I doubt it will ever come to fruition, but it’s a thought.

Imagine row after row of Cybertruck rolled out of Texas. Only instead of being in a flat, empty parking lot, each one of them is plugged in while it is waiting for it’s transport to arrive. Only they aren’t just sucking up power, Tesla quietly adds them all to their virtual power plant.

Overnight, Tesla could make one of the largest power storage projects in the US. Just using idle trucks waiting for delivery.
1637641593467.png


Probably not a thing… interesting thought experiment though. That’s a lot of untapped storage.
If Tesla reads this or has thought of this already, they probably will do it.

I don’t know about you but paying for a new truck and getting a used one don’t sit well with me. Every cycle of that battery has to serve it’s owner.
 

Ogre

Well-known member
First Name
Dennis
Joined
Jul 3, 2021
Messages
3,095
Reaction score
6,117
Location
Ogregon
Vehicles
Model Y
Country flag
If Tesla reads this or has thought of this already, they probably will do it.

I don’t know about you but paying for a new truck and getting a used one don’t sit well with me. Every cycle of that battery has to serve it’s owner.
I don’t know that Tesla would do it, almost feels like the infrastructure to do it across 1000s of trucks wouldn’t be worth it.

If they did, battery wear won’t be an issue, it’s unlikely to be parked long enough to push much power back into the grid. Likely less power than it takes to drive a 20-30 miles. Less mileage than most cars have when they roll off the lot.
 

anionic1

Well-known member
First Name
Michael
Joined
Apr 30, 2021
Messages
307
Reaction score
333
Location
Yorba Linda
Vehicles
Cybertruck
Occupation
Estimator
Country flag
As I was watching the construction site charging stations at the parking lot outside being built, it made me wonder when Y and CT are at full production and employees charging outside, how can grid handle charging every new CT and Y? Do the battery packs get charged to 50% when they are assembled somewhere else and shipped hot to be installed or they are installed empty and once vehicle is complete, they get charged to 10%, 50%, 90%. …. ? Anyone knows how this works for current production lines?
I am fairly certain that every battery pack has to get cycled numerous times as a safety test before the vehicle leaves the assembly line. I was doing some work with Rivian and that is what I hear. I don’t really get why you care where they get assembled. I have sat in meetings and heard Southern California Edison quoted as saying their grid has more than enough capacity to handle anything the EV market throws at them. Remember they are quickly losing demand to solar so this WV thing is a huge saving grace for them.
EV charging is all code driven. If the chargers are being permitted which most will be, they won’t be tied to a power source that can’t handle the demand. I have a huge project right now with 60 plus EV installed chargers, 60 plus EV ready stalls and 120 plus EV capable stalls. That alone is taking about 8000 amp of power to the building. Some large projects like this use charge controlling systems where a monitoring system prioritizes which chargers get to charge with how much power for how long so it optimized the system without needing as much max power.
 

Ogre

Well-known member
First Name
Dennis
Joined
Jul 3, 2021
Messages
3,095
Reaction score
6,117
Location
Ogregon
Vehicles
Model Y
Country flag
A related, but equally weird thought. What if Tesla were to start installing solar charging arrays at businesses with V2G capabilities. So your car gets free power every day when you go to work, but also buffers the power grid when needed.

This whole V2G (vehicle to grid) concept kind of grows on you when you think about it. Particularly if paired with Tesla’s virtual power plant concept.
 
Advertisement

 

TSLA Stock

Advertisement
Top