EV's - Self Charge as Wheel turns

ajdelange

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I'm referring to a huge net loss from when you start up the mountain, not from the top o' the hill. You'll use up more energy going up than you can recoup from regenning down. Can we agree on that?
I was going to until No. 14 popped up. If you work for an anvil company at the top of a mountain and your job is to deliver to dealers in the valley then no, you don't use more energy going up the hill than you get back going down. But, of course, that's hardly a normal situation. Taking your family up the mountain to a park and bringing them home with regen you should consume only a little more than driving them to the beach and back (assuming that you live at sea level) and that "little more"comes from the fact that regen isn't 100% efficient (can't re capture all the potential energy.
 

ldjessee

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Crissa

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Because it is empty going up, so the work going up is less than the weight and work done by gravity going down.
Right. But it proves the concept and really says that regen is pretty powerful stuff. Even if it only works in certain situations.

There's a hill on the other side of my village that going down I've gotten 5% SoC back. On a warm day, it barely takes more to go up it! The end result is going up and coming back down, I only have to pay for the straight-line mileage in range. As long as I get good regen (steady speed above min or heavy load), hills basically equal out.

-Crissa
 

ldjessee

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The work that charges this trucks batteries came from whatever geologic force it was that pushed up the mountain,
Exactly, it only gives us free power, much like solar energy, if we ignore all the parts that cost, just because we didn't 'pay' for them.
(meaning, we didn't pay for the crust rising nor do we pay for the sun's fusion)
 

LKP

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Why can't this be a thing?

The battery puts the vehicle in motion. While in motion, why can't the wheel generate electricity and recharge the battery?

I've got a radio at home that can charge by the sun as well as charge by turning the hand crank.
A wheel can be used to generate electricity while driving, however, the resistance that it causes on drag to generate electricity will have a negative effect and actually take more power to operate the vehicle. This only works during the regenerative braking or coasting when kinetic energy can be send back to the battery rather than being wasted.
 
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maconjt

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A wheel can be used to generate electricity while driving, however, the resistance that it causes on drag to generate electricity will have a negative effect and actually take more power to operate the vehicle. This only works during the regenerative braking or coasting when kinetic energy can be send back to the battery rather than being wasted.
Yep...I get it. I was just trying to think outside the box for ways to recharge the battery. Hopefully the concept of solar panels in the bed comes to fruition. :)
 

Frankenblob

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A wheel can be used to generate electricity while driving, however, the resistance that it causes on drag to generate electricity will have a negative effect and actually take more power to operate the vehicle. This only works during the regenerative braking or coasting when kinetic energy can be send back to the battery rather than being wasted.
For now things will and do advance.
 

LKP

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For now things will and do advance.
Things do advance, however, one can't get around the law of physics. Perpetual motion energy just isn't possible.
 

Luke42

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Yep...I get it. I was just trying to think outside the box for ways to recharge the battery. Hopefully the concept of solar panels in the bed comes to fruition. :)
The best way to charge an EV for free IMHO is to build a solar carport. That's my out-of-the-box free-energy suggestion.

The surface area of the car is too small to provide much photovoltaic (PV) range -- the 15 miles per day Musk mentioned sounds "optimistic". From the numbers I've played with, putting PV panels on the car only replaces wall-charging if you can turn something close to 100% of the light arriving on the car into electricity. Being able to turn 25% of of the light into electricity is considered really good efficiency, and getting past that is a Really Hard physics & engineering problem. You'll be able to tell if PV panels ever get close to 100% because the panels will be much harder to photograph than my black cat. It's very likely that solar panels on the car body will only be for supplemental power for the foreseeable future.

However, the surface area above a parking spot is a much closer to the size required to power a typical commute.

If your house has an unshaded parking space, just build a carport over your parking spot and use PV panels for the roof.

If you're on-grid, use a grid-tie (micro)inverter and call it a day. If you're off-grid (or you live in a regressive state which discourages net metering), use a battery just a little bit bigger than the number of kWh you use on your daily commute so you can charge your vehicle at night.

Solar carports and solar pergolas are the way to go!

No, it's not free, but you pay now and then drive for free later. The payoff for a project like could easily extend to 25 years -- or however long the warranty on your PV gear lasts. You've gotta spend money to save money sometimes. I'd save this project for a financial-windfall year -- when you have the option to pay now to save later.

That's my out-of-the-box free-energy suggestion.
 
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Owner13669

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Why can't this be a thing?

The battery puts the vehicle in motion. While in motion, why can't the wheel generate electricity and recharge the battery?

I've got a radio at home that can charge by the sun as well as charge by turning the hand crank.
To quote one of the greats TANSTAAFL. “There ain’t no such thing as a free lunch”
 
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