Gordon E Peterson II

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STLD is the ticker. I bought a couple when I heard about the Sinton plans way back when. Seems to be a solid American steel company. But I'm no expert. If it's good enough for Tesla and SpaceX is good enough for me.​
 

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Very, Very Nice! Thank You Gordon for the link
But the drone moves way too fast, I had to pause it repeatedly to try to figure out what is what. I've been inside steel mills before, but the sheet rollers were the only thing I could pick out right away on the first time through the vid. A little commentary would go a long way.

Now I'm hungry to see some of those interior drone shots produced at Giga Texas!
 

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The steel plant appears to be state-of-the-art. SpaceX has a lot of experience with SS so I am confident they can engineer the scoring, bending and welding of a Cybertruck monocoque exoskeleton. I am very curious as to what the final stainless formula/exterior finish will be.

Everything is slowly coming together for Q2 2022 production of the Cybertruck. A new 4680 battery cell production building, stainless steel supplier, huge Austin assembly plant, 8-ton Giga casting machine soon, etc. Multiple sources from Tesla confirm that they are working on pilot production of the Cybertruck at Fremont to speed up validation and then moving the production equipment to Giga Texas.

57E378BE-42BD-44A1-8ABA-25B2C63D5DE6.jpeg
 
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Gordon E Peterson II

Gordon E Peterson II

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Very, Very Nice! Thank You Gordon for the link
But the drone moves way too fast, I had to pause it repeatedly to try to figure out what is what. I've been inside steel mills before, but the sheet rollers were the only thing I could pick out right away on the first time through the vid. A little commentary would go a long way.

Now I'm hungry to see some of those interior drone shots produced at Giga Texas!
Does anybody know whether this 3mm thick stainless steel is going to be delivered as flat sheets, or how? Hard to imagine how it could be bent onto a spool or something...?!
 

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I know it is delivered to Boca Chica in rolls for use building the starships but the starships are mostly round so I would imagine a different plan for the CT but I’m just guessing.
 

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Does anybody know whether this 3mm thick stainless steel is going to be delivered as flat sheets, or how? Hard to imagine how it could be bent onto a spool or something...?!
Spool.

Everything can be bent at some deflection. In fact, that's how they describe making the truck. It's not being stamped, after all.

-Crissa
 

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So are they making the spools here, or the CT panels as well? Looks more like spools, but it's huge, if this is the body shop, we could be looking at much higher CT production numbers.
 

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So are they making the spools here, or the CT panels as well? Looks more like spools, but it's huge, if this is the body shop, we could be looking at much higher CT production numbers.
Spools. Maybe sheets.

The actual folding is for the Austin plant.

-Crissa
 

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Tesla will receive them as spools, just like their aluminum raw materials.

SS rolls come in gauges down to 7, anything under 0.187" (4.5mm) in thickness will definitely come as a roll--also depends on the specific steel. Gauges under 7 will come as sheets. This is just a path of least resistance thing and a money equation. Each material has similar thresholds. No manufacturer I've ever worked with will ship 11 gauge (CT thickness) SS in plates.

Aluminum alloys are kind of weird and are usually plate after 1/4", but sometimes they'll stop rolling it over 8 gauge (around 1/8" I think?) depending on the alloy and it's elasticity.

SDI is producing the rolls
SDI -> Tesla -> cutting/folding -> Cybertruck-ifying -> My garage plz, thx
 

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Tesla will receive them as spools, just like their aluminum raw materials.

SS rolls come in gauges down to 7, anything under 0.187" (4.5mm) in thickness will definitely come as a roll--also depends on the specific steel. Gauges under 7 will come as sheets. This is just a path of least resistance thing and a money equation. Each material has similar thresholds. No manufacturer I've ever worked with will ship 11 gauge (CT thickness) SS in plates.

Aluminum alloys are kind of weird and are usually plate after 1/4", but sometimes they'll stop rolling it over 8 gauge (around 1/8" I think?) depending on the alloy and it's elasticity.
Good to know.

I'm wondering what the CT panel folding line will look like. I'm expecting it to be mostly automated.
But I'm still a bit unclear on what parts are folded and which are stamped. The cabin frame looks stamped to me because of its shape. So this part might be much thinner that the skin.

Also I wonder how heavy the doors will be because of the thick skin used, and maybe the reason it might need a door assist system to some degree. I don't believe the doors themselves help structurally in any way either, except for side impact protection.
 

tmeyer3

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Good to know.

I'm wondering what the CT panel folding line will look like. I'm expecting it to be mostly automated.
But I'm still a bit unclear on what parts are folded and which are stamped. The cabin frame looks stamped to me because of its shape. So this part might be much thinner that the skin.

Also I wonder how heavy the doors will be because of the thick skin used, and maybe the reason it might need a door assist system to some degree. I don't believe the doors themselves help structurally in any way either, except for side impact protection.
I can sorta explain this, but Tesla hasn't released enough details to be 100% certain.

Facts:
The the 8000 ton casting press from IDRA will be creating the Cybertruck rear underbody in a single piece. This will not be made from the 30X stainless steel, but from a different alloy that permits casting much better than SS.

Educated guessing:
That being said, that casting will not be exposed to the elements like the SS unibody will be. The unibody is folded and holds the stresses and weight of the vehicle. If I understand correctly, the rear underbody casting will be inside the bed of the truck to distribute loads evenly across the chassis (in this case exoskeleton, that's weird to say). There are a lot more parts than just that shiny exoskeleton, and the super-duper press reduces production time/costs and potential points of failure.

The doors will probably be pretty heavy!! I can do some guestimation math if you'd like, let me know.

Cheers!
 
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Gordon E Peterson II

Gordon E Peterson II

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I can sorta explain this, but Tesla hasn't released enough details to be 100% certain.

Facts:
The the 8000 ton casting press from IDRA will be creating the Cybertruck rear underbody in a single piece. This will not be made from the 30X stainless steel, but from a different alloy that permits casting much better than SS.

Educated guessing:
That being said, that casting will not be exposed to the elements like the SS unibody will be. The unibody is folded and holds the stresses and weight of the vehicle. If I understand correctly, the rear underbody casting will be inside the bed of the truck to distribute loads evenly across the chassis (in this case exoskeleton, that's weird to say). There are a lot more parts than just that shiny exoskeleton, and the super-duper press reduces production time/costs and potential points of failure.

The doors will probably be pretty heavy!! I can do some guestimation math if you'd like, let me know.

Cheers!
The castings are an aluminum alloy, and they ABSOLUTELY are exposed to the elements. You can see that in the current production MY. I've wondered in fact if the bed of the CT isn't part of the aluminum casting! That would certainly help explain why the 8,000 ton Gigapress is needed for that.

One thing that I've wondered about is whether there will be an issue of "electrogalvanic corrosion" where the aluminum and stainless steel are joined... this was an issue at the NY World Trade Center (where the decorative aluminum ribs were going to start falling off, and were going to need some kind of reattaching... part of why the Port of New York Authority had filed THREE separate demolition requests for the twin towers (which requests were all denied!), before the towers came down on 9/11...!)
 

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The castings are an aluminum alloy, and they ABSOLUTELY are exposed to the elements. You can see that in the current production MY.
In model Y, yes, but it is also a part of the frame. How do you know the production of the Cybertruck will be the same as the model Y? I mean, the CT doesn't even have a frame. If anyone actually knows how the CT production will happen, it'd be all over the place. But you're right, it could be exposed, but then wouldn't that make it a body on frame design like the model Y?

My assumption was based on how aircraft are made, since their design is closer to the CT than the model Y. The pressed parts are used internally for structure and load balancing.

But I have no idea, really lol
 

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