Fremont production of Cybertruck

Martin Harford

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If Fremont is to do the pilot production of Cybertruck, will it be a finite production run or ongoing? If finite, how many are estimated to be produced prior to shifting over to Austin? If infinite, what annual production could be reasonably expected in tandem with Austin? Would it be a specific line like the tri-motor? Any thoughts?
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They are not actually building vehicles at Femont and if so only in extremely limited quantities. and not ones that will end up in customers hands. What is happening in Fremont is Tesla getting their manufacturing line set up, doing some tests and programming any software necessary to run the line as well. They are also likely aligning things in certain ways and ensuring they can meet the precision tolerances necessary. This allows them to program all the robots and machinery necessary for the most part prior to being installed on the actual line in Texas. Then once the 8000ton press is ready, it will all be packed up and shipped over to Texas to be reassembled and then only fine tuning will be needed.
 
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Martin Harford

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They are not actually building vehicles at Femont and if so only in extremely limited quantities. and not ones that will end up in customers hands. What is happening in Fremont is Tesla getting their manufacturing line set up, doing some tests and programming any software necessary to run the line as well. They are also likely aligning things in certain ways and ensuring they can meet the precision tolerances necessary. This allows them to program all the robots and machinery necessary for the most part prior to being installed on the actual line in Texas. Then once the 8000ton press is ready, it will all be packed up and shipped over to Texas to be reassembled and then only fine tuning
will be needed.
That makes more sense. I've always hated moving. That's one move I'd steer clear of!
 

Jhodgesatmb

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They are not actually building vehicles at Femont and if so only in extremely limited quantities. and not ones that will end up in customers hands. What is happening in Fremont is Tesla getting their manufacturing line set up, doing some tests and programming any software necessary to run the line as well. They are also likely aligning things in certain ways and ensuring they can meet the precision tolerances necessary. This allows them to program all the robots and machinery necessary for the most part prior to being installed on the actual line in Texas. Then once the 8000ton press is ready, it will all be packed up and shipped over to Texas to be reassembled and then only fine tuning will be needed.
I agree with everything here except anything about the 8K ton gigapress. They do not need any gigapress to pilot the manufacturing line, but even if they do they could use one of the other casting machines as long as it results in a rear end of the right dimensions.
 

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I agree with everything here except anything about the 8K ton gigapress. They do not need any gigapress to pilot the manufacturing line, but even if they do they could use one of the other casting machines as long as it results in a rear end of the right dimensions.
I could see how what I said was confusing. I agree with you, I don't think that press will ever be in Fremont. It will go straight to Austin from the manufacturer and get dialed in there.
 

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I agree with everything here except anything about the 8K ton gigapress. They do not need any gigapress to pilot the manufacturing line, but even if they do they could use one of the other casting machines as long as it results in a rear end of the right dimensions.
They could pilot it with an enormous CNC mill instead of the gigapress.

The takt time wouldn't be suitable for mass production, but that's fine for debugging the rest of the process.
 
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They are doing a pilot line. Not a production line. They are learning how to build the machine to build the machine.
I highly doubt any of these Cybertrucks from Fremont, will be going to paying customers. They are pre-production vehicles.
Like this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pre-production_car
 
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Martin Harford

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They did this with the Model Y, setting up a sample line, then building the real one in the factory, and sent parts and finished models to Shanghai to help them start their production.

-Crissa
Now that makes sense.
 

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I am 100% cool with these trucks not being production. What I look forward to is the wave of "prototype spotting" posts that will come out of it (as we saw with MY a year ago and currently the refreshes of the S/X).

The more I see this truck in the wild, the more excited I get.
 
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Martin Harford

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I agree, but I'm not holding my breath. I reserved a dual motor on 25 Nov 19 but expected delivery isn't until late March 2023. "A month or so" away.
 

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They could pilot it with an enormous CNC mill instead of the gigapress.

The takt time wouldn't be suitable for mass production, but that's fine for debugging the rest of the process.
I think you/we need to remember that piloting a manufacturing line is about a process: sequencing, timing, positioning, the bill of processes and materials. You are talking about a single part. The manufacturing process is not about a single part at all, and we should forget about it, especially given that the production of that single part is a single step in the process. As long as they know how long it takes to produce the part, and where it will be when produced, that part of the process is done, and a premade rear end can be provided at the right location and time. I would be much more concerned with the exoskeleton than with the rear end because that isn’t a one-step process at all, and everything in the vehicle will be attached to it. If they don’t get that right the game is over.
 
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