Giga Texas - The 8th Wonder of the World

TruckElectric

Well-known member
First Name
Bryan
Joined
Jun 16, 2020
Messages
1,790
Reaction score
2,391
Location
Texas
Vehicles
Dodge Ram diesel
Occupation
Retired
Country flag
Colossal, Magnificent, Wonderous, Umwerfend, Stupendo, Thavmásios.............


1_642ffbd8-2de1-4089-8bc6-36ac22a13b18_600x600.jpg
Advertisement

 

Bigvbear

Well-known member
First Name
Justin
Joined
Apr 26, 2020
Messages
311
Reaction score
551
Location
Eugene, OR
Website
ts.la
Vehicles
2001 Chevy Tracker, 2018 Jeep Cherokee
Occupation
IT
Country flag
I’m actually quite curious why some of it is concrete frame and roof construction and some is steel. Maybe someone more familiar with structural engineering can enlighten me.
 

flowerlandfilms

Well-known member
First Name
Eryk
Joined
Dec 6, 2020
Messages
98
Reaction score
203
Location
Australia
Vehicles
Yamaha SRV-250
Occupation
Film Maker
Country flag
I’m actually quite curious why some of it is concrete frame and roof construction and some is steel. Maybe someone more familiar with structural engineering can enlighten me.
...concrete is quicker...
...but if you want large areas of uninterrupted space (no big concrete columns/pilons)...
...then you want steel, which has a better strength to weight ratio...
...both have pros and cons...
 

Jhodgesatmb

Well-known member
First Name
Jack
Joined
Dec 1, 2019
Messages
1,330
Reaction score
1,588
Location
San Francisco Bay area
Vehicles
Lexus Rx450H Tesla Model 3
Occupation
Researcher
Country flag
I’m actually quite curious why some of it is concrete frame and roof construction and some is steel. Maybe someone more familiar with structural engineering can enlighten me.
In this case I believe that the huge gantry cranes, their number (two on the north end and three on the south end) the weight they must carry, and the height of the cranes given the size of things they have to move might have disposed the design toward concrete columns.
 

Sirfun

Well-known member
First Name
Joe
Joined
Dec 28, 2019
Messages
984
Reaction score
1,724
Location
Oxnard, California
Vehicles
Toyota Avalon, Chrysler Pacifica PHEV, Ford E-250
Occupation
Retired Sheet Metal Worker
Country flag
I’m actually quite curious why some of it is concrete frame and roof construction and some is steel. Maybe someone more familiar with structural engineering can enlighten me.
Different processes have different design needs. The areas with concrete have full height and larger open areas meaning distance between columns much further. One reason could be Semi production requires larger open spaces. Like someone else said, they've installed massive gantry cranes on rails in some of those areas already.
 

Cyberman

Well-known member
First Name
Adam
Joined
Apr 7, 2020
Messages
621
Reaction score
1,021
Location
San Diego
Vehicles
F150,F550, Escape
Occupation
Cybercontractor
Country flag
It's a factory. :rolleyes:
You are correct sir. But it's much more than just a factory... it's a place where dreams are born, where... OK, I'll shut up. It's a factory. A cool, Cybertruck factory. All right, I can't shut up. I love this place 'cause it's gonna make make my CT, it's like Disneyland for Cybertruck owners. We're witnessing history in the making, folks. In the future, like 20 years from now, when they're building Tera factory #77 (on fucking Mars, probably), we'll be able to say, "I was there to see when they broke ground on Tera Austin, the one that made Tesla explode in size and scope. That's why we all live in Cyberhouses with Cybersolar roofs, CyberHVAC and Cyberplumbing"
Sorry, I'm slowly going insane waiting. 😬
 

Bigvbear

Well-known member
First Name
Justin
Joined
Apr 26, 2020
Messages
311
Reaction score
551
Location
Eugene, OR
Website
ts.la
Vehicles
2001 Chevy Tracker, 2018 Jeep Cherokee
Occupation
IT
Country flag
Two if you have mentioned gantry cranes but I do not think that’s a factor in it needing yo be concrete. Boeing has massive gantry cranes to move huge sections of aircraft and their buildings are steel construction. They are also massive open spaces without columns.

itwill be interesting to see what winds up in those areas.
 

Akgolf

Well-known member
First Name
Jimmy
Joined
May 26, 2020
Messages
147
Reaction score
325
Location
Jones, OK
Vehicles
2016 Nissan Leaf and 2016 Toyota Prius V.
Occupation
Retired Computer Programmer, USAF
Country flag
The roof structure that is steel is interesting.

Why do the ridges on part of the roof run from top to bottom(looks like to channel water), but on the other half the ridges run sideways?
 

CompMaster

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 25, 2020
Messages
106
Reaction score
140
Location
CA
Vehicles
Tri CT
Country flag
Too much to speculate until it's done. Unless someone has access to prints..
 

Crissa

Well-known member
First Name
Crissa
Joined
Jul 8, 2020
Messages
5,973
Reaction score
7,847
Location
Santa Cruz
Vehicles
2014 Zero S, 2013 Mazda 3
Country flag
...but if you want large areas of uninterrupted space (no big concrete columns/pilons)...
...then you want steel, which has a better strength to weight ratio...
...Except the concrete pillars are where there are fewer of them!

Which is entirely the difference. The pre-cast pillars are stronger than the smaller pieces of steel they're making the rest of the factory from.

It'll all be steel wrapped in a concretion of some kind when they're done.

Why do the ridges on part of the roof run from top to bottom(looks like to channel water), but on the other half the ridges run sideways?
For a roof that large, it all has to run to a drain at some point. So there are many different sections with isolated drains. You're probably seeing the under-structure of the panels at this point, tho.

-Crissa
 

myco.rrhizae

Well-known member
First Name
Myco
Joined
Aug 9, 2020
Messages
112
Reaction score
149
Location
N. Cal
Vehicles
F150 4.9L, Chevy Volt, Tri-Motor Cybertruck
Occupation
Carpenter
Country flag
I’m actually quite curious why some of it is concrete frame and roof construction and some is steel. Maybe someone more familiar with structural engineering can enlighten me.
*not an engineer* but my understanding is that both types of structures involve steel for its sheer and tension value while certain portions are steel reinforced concrete, which has higher compression value and fire tolerance, so for areas with foundries and gantry cranes, etc. but its more expensive and not as ideal for multi-level areas like the steel-only structure
 

carpedatum

Well-known member
First Name
Dave
Joined
Feb 19, 2020
Messages
63
Reaction score
110
Location
SF Bay Area
Vehicles
Ridgeline, R1200RT, 4285 Express
Country flag
I'm sure this is covered elsewhere but there are a handful of drone pilots putting up some great vids on YouTube regularly as this wonderful thing goes up. I am particularly a fan of Joe Tegtmeyer's stuff - he does a bunch of research and takes the time to share it.

The area that relies more on concrete for structural beams seems to be at the southeast corner, where the die manufacturing, stamping machines, and gigapress machines are located. Many of these machines are on isolation structures (so their force isn't translated to the rest of the factory). Not sure why, exactly, but they've called for a lot of concrete pillars there and more steel in the sections devoted to paint, GA, battery manufacturing, etc. The die-making and stamping machine sections, in particular, seem to call for more open vertical space and there's a massive bridge crane structure involved, so I would speculate that it was thought better/faster/cheaper to use concrete pillars here, and steel elsewhere.

As for the roof, they appear to be laying rebar and pouring concrete over the whole thing, much as they are on the floors below. So you will see bare metal on each roof section until the concrete is poured over it. Apparently (absent plans) the drainage begins with the slope of the roof. The photo at the top of this thread (thanks, TruckElectric!) appears to be a north-to-south shot. Generally speaking, water will drain first to the east or west, depending on where you are standing. The rest isn't obvious yet.
 
Last edited:
Advertisement

 
Advertisement
Top