How to get out of the cybertruck after "it floats a while"?

bymw

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Now that the glass is un-breakable. A panic button like a fighter jet pilot? I'll take that :)
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roncruiser

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How to get out after it sinks?
 

ricinro

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With the exoskeleton and armor glass it will be hard for rescue folks to get inside to help unconscious folks.
 

Crissa

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With the exoskeleton and armor glass it will be hard for rescue folks to get inside to help unconscious folks.
These will pry off like anything else. More likely it means anyone inside will last longer before being suffocated.

-Crissa
 

madquadbiker

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These will pry off like anything else. More likely it means anyone inside will last longer before being suffocated.

-Crissa
Just drive it to shore like Roger Moore did in the Lotus.
 

FutureBoy

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My family are all originally (OK just as far back as I know personally) cowboys. Their horses were all trained to go home to the barn in the case that they lost their riders. In fact I experienced this myself once when I was thrown off a horse while herding cattle. As soon as I was off and on the ground, the horse immediately turned tail and ran home. The point of this behavior is that if a cowboy is injured the horse will call for help by returning home so anyone at the homestead will see the horse and know to go looking for the rider.

Now I don’t want to be abandoned by my CT while I’m out in the wilderness. But in the case of injury or some other emergency, it would be nice if my CT could rescue me by driving me either home or to the nearest hospital. Or at least do the best that it could along those lines. I might still be required to clear a downed tree or some other such blockage.
 

Cyberman

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Why would you want to get out of a perfectly floating CT? Enjoy yourself! Open a book, relax, get some you time in. If'n you don't want to steer it through the waves, wait 'till it settles on the ocean floor, and step on it.
It is, after all, a cousin to the James Bond Lotus.
 

OneLapper

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This scenario reminds me of a childhood neighbor that bought his wife a Land Rover and decided to drive it into a flooded road. He thought it would fill up with water, he'd get out and walk/swim to the pavement. Well, the current took the SUV and as soon as it was off the road the nose tipped down and totally surprised him with how fast it went down. It was at night, the water cold, the truck supposedly rolled and he nearly drowned getting out. He said he thought he was going to actually die.

Why was he purposely driving into water? The Land Rover never ran right from new. The dealer couldn't fix it. He couldn't return it. Blatant insurance fraud. Any how, some time after that incident he spent a couple years "away". He was a cop, lost his job if I recall. Wife divorced him, too. She drives a Jeep now, btw.
 
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TheLastStarfighter

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This scenario reminds me of a childhood neighbor that bought his wife a Land Rover and decided to drive it into a flooded road. He thought it would fill up with water, he'd get out and walk/swim to the pavement. Well, the current took the SUV and as soon as it was off the road the nose tipped down and totally surprised him with how fast it went down. It was at night, the water cold, the truck supposedly rolled while. He nearly drowned getting out. He said he thought he was going to actually die.

Why was he purposely driving into water? The Land Rover never ran right from new. The dealer couldn't fix it. He couldn't return it. Blatant insurance fraud. Any how, some time after that incident he spent a couple years "away". He was a cop, lost his job if I recall. Wife divorced him, too. She drives a Jeep now, btw.
This is why you should buy electric. The gas vehicle was the start of all of the problems.
 

Cyberman

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This is why you should buy electric. The gas vehicle was the start of all of the problems.
EXACTLY. My Dad used to tell me stories of how when he grew up in 1930's Philly there were electric trucks all over the place. They were used for deliveries all around town. Big array of lead acid batteries, re-charge at night. They worked, but ICE engines took off, and for whatever reason BEV's became a footnote. This was before global warming, obviously, and people just preferred the reliability and range of the ICE. When I went to the Peterson Automotive Museum to see the Cybertruck in person (It was BREATHTAKING!) I saw an old BEV from the 1920's, really cool to see. Even one of my neighbors in the 1980's had a couple of odd-looking electric cars in his front yard. They've been around forever, but are just now getting range comparable to and beyond internal combustion. The ICE age is coming to an end, my friends.
 
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FutureBoy

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EXACTLY. My Dad used to tell me stories of how when he grew up in 1930's Philly there were electric trucks all over the place. They were used for deliveries all around town. Big array of lead acid batteries, re-charge at night. They worked, but ICE engines took off, and for whatever reason BEV's became a footnote. This was before global warming, obviously, and people just preferred the reliability of the ICE. When I went to the Peterson Automotive Museum to see the Cybertruck in person (It was breathtaking) I saw an old BEV from the 1920's, really cool to see. Even one of my neighbors in the 1980's had a couple of odd-looking electric cars in his front yard. They've been around forever, but are just now getting range comparable to and beyond internal combustion. The ICE age is coming to an end, my friends
Would be interesting to get some of the old BEVs and hotrod them with updated power trains.
 
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