IDRA 8000 Ton Aluminum Press material concerns with Cybertruck Stainless Steel Material

hridge2020

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The 6,000-ton die-casting machine currently being used for Model Y/3 is using aluminum for its casting.

My concern, hopefully, yours too, the 8,000-ton die-casting machine schedule to be used for the Cybertruck is also using aluminum for its castings.

The main concern is, aluminum and stainless steel parts will be assembled together.
You shouldn't use Stainless Steel and Aluminum Together - it causes Galvanic Corrosion.

(
Galvanic corrosion is the transfer of electrons from one material (anode) to another (cathode).

  • Anode – material that is positively charged, electrons leave this material
  • Cathode – material that is negatively charged, electrons enter this material
  • Electrolyte – liquid that aids in the process of electron transfer
  • Corrosion/corrode – Destroy or weaken metal gradually

Galvanic corrosion occurs when two materials (an anode and a cathode) come into contact with each other and an electrolyte. Electrolytes can be environmental factors such as humidity or rainwater. When these factors come into play, electron transfer will begin to occur. Depending on the level of resistance in an electrolyte, this transfer can happen much faster. This is why saltwater, an electrolyte with very low resistance, is a common factor when considering what product to use. Due to this, it is incredibly important to consider what material you are going to use in an environment. When working with a marine, saltwater environment, you even need to consider the type of stainless steel you are using.

There are multiple kinds of rust that can occur during the oxidization process.

How Can Galvanic Corrosion be stopped?
There are a few steps you can take if you MUST use these materials together.

  1. Add an insulator between the two materials so they no longer connect. Without that connection, the transfer of electrons cannot occur. Well Nuts are a commonly used fastener to help separate materials that can suffer from galvanic corrosion.
  2. Use materials with the same potential. Metals with the same corrosion resistance are typically ok to use together.
  3. If you are in a situation where only one of the materials will come into contact with an electrolyte then the transfer of electrons will not occur.
  4. If there is a coating on the cathode it can prevent the transfer through increased resistance.
  5. Consider your environment before installing. Choose materials that will work for your environment.
  6. Coat or paint your assembly (completely) so that the electrolyte cannot make contact with the materials
  7. Use neoprene EPDM or bonding washers as a barrier in between the metals.
Just an FYI, for the engineers/production staff, to perform during the manufacture of this product.


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Ogre

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I know I've heard Elon talking about the issues of working with different materials. I'm not sure he's mentioned this, but I know they talked about different expansion/ contraction based on temperature.

Tesla has some pretty good materials engineers working on the truck so I'm not too worried about this.
 

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Not at all worried. These hurdles have been addressed. The industry in general has been building aluminum engines, wheels, body panels, drivelines, pickup beds. 304 is a great material, and depending on the alloy type, aluminum is also. Toyota built steel frames and leaf springs for Tacoma, Tundra, Sequoia (04'-11')that rusted through along with panels on the RAV4. Ford, GM, Kia and Mazda also have later model vehicles on the (rust) bucket list. Tesla had issues with the Model 3. I don't know if the old rule is still true that you never want the first year of any new model but I'm not dumping my reservation over this concern. Expansion joints and isolation materials developed today are far better than older cars with designed obsolescence.
Toyota-Tacoma-Broken-Frame.jpg
 
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hridge2020

hridge2020

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Not at all worried. These hurdles have been addressed. The industry in general has been building aluminum engines, wheels, body panels, drivelines, pickup beds. 304 is a great material, and depending on the alloy type, aluminum is also. Toyota built steel frames and leaf springs for Tacoma, Tundra, Sequoia (04'-11')that rusted through along with panels on the RAV4. Ford, GM, Kia and Mazda also have later model vehicles on the (rust) bucket list. Tesla had issues with the Model 3. I don't know if the old rule is still true that you never want the first year of any new model but I'm not dumping my reservation over this concern. Expansion joints and isolation materials developed today are far better than older cars with designed obsolescence.
Toyota-Tacoma-Broken-Frame.jpg

Just don't want this engineer working on the Cybertruck


banding and molding.jpg
 
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hridge2020

hridge2020

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That's not an engineer, that is an assembler who ran out of parts after being told in very clear terms they need to ship cars by end of quarter".

Last I've checked, One must get engineering approval for changes, plus notify management and quality would have to buy off on it... Thats a good Certified ISO facility would work.
 

Ogre

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Last I've checked, One must get engineering approval for changes, plus notify management and quality would have to buy off on it... Thats a good Certified ISO facility would work.
Last I checked, when the end of the quarter comes around Tesla doesn't like having cars sitting in the factory waiting for parts. Lots of corners get cut.

If the clamp assembly to hold that down wasn't in stock and you have 50 cars which are ready save that one piece, you can bet at some point in time either the manager or the engineer in charge was told "Just get it out the door". Things can look like hell but still do their job.

People talk about not wanting the early cars off the assembly line. I don't want the ones which roll off the assembly line on the last days of the quarter.
 

happy intruder

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Last I've checked, One must get engineering approval for changes, plus notify management and quality would have to buy off on it... Thats a good Certified ISO facility would work.
so much for the ISO Certification process....they much have used Perry
 

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Last I checked, when the end of the quarter comes around Tesla doesn't like having cars sitting in the factory waiting for parts. Lots of corners get cut.

If the clamp assembly to hold that down wasn't in stock and you have 50 cars which are ready save that one piece, you can bet at some point in time either the manager or the engineer in charge was told "Just get it out the door". Things can look like hell but still do their job.

People talk about not wanting the early cars off the assembly line. I don't want the ones which roll off the assembly line on the last days of the quarter.
they can get an approved deviation to the process very easy and simple
 

Crissa

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I mean.... at least it's not a zip tie......
It is a zip tie. Metal key style. You can get them in stainless, bronze, etc. Spouse used some gold anodized ones to decorate her bass flute case she built. They're very durable. Used to hold appliances in earthquakes, seal pipes, they're handy.

-Crissa
 

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I think Tesla can manage to figure out how to safely join the two materials..

Thank you for putting this diplomatically.

I was going to spend too much time telling the OP that his post is, well, pointless. Maybe I was going to go too far and say he's stirring the Gordon Johnson pot.

Furthermore, I was going to say that the OP has likely NEVER tried to remove a metal tie strap, let alone a stainless steel tie strap. That there is a legit use of that mechanical fastener.

Next!
 
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fritter63

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It is a zip tie. Metal key style. You can get them in stainless, bronze, etc. Spouse used some gold anodized ones to decorate her bass flute case she built. They're very durable. Used to hold appliances in earthquakes, seal pipes, they're handy.

-Crissa
It is a zip tie. Metal key style. You can get them in stainless, bronze, etc. Spouse used some gold anodized ones to decorate her bass flute case she built. They're very durable. Used to hold appliances in earthquakes, seal pipes, they're handy.

-Crissa
But it's not the common zip tie (plastic) that we all think of and was the point of the joke.

Time to lighten up, Crissa!

 

Ogre

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It is a zip tie. Metal key style. You can get them in stainless, bronze, etc. Spouse used some gold anodized ones to decorate her bass flute case she built. They're very durable. Used to hold appliances in earthquakes, seal pipes, they're handy.

-Crissa
That's the thing about this hack... while it is ugly as hell, it may well last the life of the car. There are probably dozens of Teslas out there which will go to the recycler with the owner never knowing this sort of thing was under the frunk the whole time (I think it's in the frunk).

I still wouldn't want it in my car though.
 
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