Lucid Air EV Has a Projected 517 Miles of Range, and We Saw 458 Miles on a Real-World Ride-Along

TruckElectric

Well-known member
First Name
Bryan
Joined
Jun 16, 2020
Messages
1,784
Reaction score
2,383
Location
Texas
Vehicles
Dodge Ram diesel
Occupation
Retired
Country flag
Lucid Air EV Has a Projected 517 Miles of Range, and We Saw 458 Miles on a Real-World Ride-Along

The startup's electric sedan gets a Tesla-beating (by far) EPA-estimated range. We rode along as the CEO drove a prototype and got close to achieving it.


lucid-air-beauty-shot-web-1597084770.jpg?crop=0.jpg

LUCID MOTORS
  • Lucid announced that the upcoming Air luxury sedan will have a range of 517 miles, besting the Tesla Model S by more than 100 miles.
  • The automaker says it achieved this through a combination of battery technology, parts consolidation, and aerodynamics.
  • The Lucid Air will be unveiled on September 9 and is expected to go on sale in the first part of 2021.
"We got 517 miles."

Lucid CEO Peter Rawlinson told me the projected range of the upcoming Lucid Air luxury sedan during a midday break of a mileage run in one of the company’s prototypes. We had just pulled into Lucid's headquarters in Newhall, California, as the chase car and current champion of range with 402 miles—the Tesla Model S—was depleted of energy. The car had covered an impressive 357.7 miles of highway driving before entering into a low-power limp mode that required immediate charging.

The Lucid Air beta vehicle I was riding in still had 20 percent state of charge, and after a quick meal, I would once again sit in the back seat behind a plexiglass barrier with a mask on my face to see how far the prototype vehicle could go before it also needed to be hooked to the grid.


img-3425-1597084292.jpg


Lucid recently shared its slippery 0.21 drag coefficient, and earlier this year, at an event for reservation holders, Rawlinson showed off the vehicle's single unit that houses the transmission, inverter, and motor. Lucid hasn't shared its battery capacity yet, but it's lower than what the automaker had originally planned. "In fact, we started off with a 130-kilowatt-hour pack . . . we announced that back in 2016. It's not that size. We've gone down quite a lot. And that's what I'm thrilled about because I want to get the numbers with a smaller pack, not a bigger pack," Rawlinson told C/D.

What we do know is that the production vehicle’s battery capacity will be between 110.0 and 130.0 kWh. No matter where it lands between those two numbers, it'll be larger than Tesla's 100.0-kWh battery pack in the Model S, which does give it a leg up on the range front. It also helps that Rawlinson helped build the Model S during his time at Tesla and that Lucid has been building Formula E battery packs for years.

Even with that history, Lucid is making sure that today's news is backed up with data from FEV and a mileage run. Which brings me back to the rear seat of the Lucid Air prototype. During the drive, the vehicle maintained 70 mph on the highway when possible. At one point, the cruise control stopped working, so Lucid director of press communications Andrew Hussey had to take over. Twice during the trip, the vehicle needed to essentially reboot. We pulled over, the car was shut down and restarted, and we were back on our way. It's a prototype, after all.

img-9869-1597084550.jpg?crop=1.00xw:0.668xh;0,0.jpg

ROBERTO BALDWINCAR AND DRIVER
Earlier in the testing, a Porsche Taycan Turbo S was part of the caravan, but it bowed out after 232.2 miles of freeway driving. At 4:20 p.m., we pulled back in to the Lucid headquarters parking lot. The prototype covered 458.6 miles with the air conditioning on in the real world. The drive lends credibility to the 517-mile range estimate according to EPA methods. But again, it’s a prototype, and this range result is not the official number yet.

The company still needs to deliver a final production vehicle. For example, the prototype we rode in had weight added to simulate the expected production curb weight of the Air. It's possible there will be changes between now and early 2021, when the company plans to start production, that may change its range figure.

img-8876-1597085017.jpg

ROBERTO BALDWINCAR AND DRIVER
But even if it loses a few miles, an Air with a 500-mile (give or take) range will put not only Tesla on notice, but also the traditional automakers that have struggled to keep up with Tesla. In other words, get ready for the range wars, where the winner will ultimately be drivers.

This content is imported from {embed-name}. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.



ROBERTO BALDWINCAR AND DRIVER
The projected range Lucid has announced is based on testing from FEV North America, a third-party testing facility. The facility ran the EPA's multicycle test procedure (SAE J1634, Oct 2012 standard), which is how the range of most other EVs (including Tesla's) is determined. Hitting over 500 miles of range is an EV milestone. More important, it’s something Lucid expects to put on the road in the near future, with deliveries of the Lucid Air expected to begin in early 2021.

Making the Air as efficient as possible to hit this goal has been one of the driving philosophies of the CEO and his company. In a statement, Rawlinson said, "I believe that our 900-volt architecture, our race-proven battery packs, miniaturized motors and power electronics, integrated transmission systems, aerodynamics, chassis and thermal systems, software, and overall system efficiency have now reached a stage where it collectively sets a new standard and delivers a host of 'world's firsts.' "

img-0294-1597084373.jpg?crop=1.00xw:0.668xh;0,0.jpg

ROBERTO BALDWINCAR AND DRIVER


Source: CAR AND DRIVER
Advertisement

 

Crissa

Well-known member
First Name
Crissa
Joined
Jul 8, 2020
Messages
5,948
Reaction score
7,820
Location
Santa Cruz
Vehicles
2014 Zero S, 2013 Mazda 3
Country flag
When you only use a few tens of miles a day, is it really all that efficient to drag around a battery twenty times larger than the average daily commute?

-Crissa
 
OP
OP
TruckElectric

TruckElectric

Well-known member
First Name
Bryan
Joined
Jun 16, 2020
Messages
1,784
Reaction score
2,383
Location
Texas
Vehicles
Dodge Ram diesel
Occupation
Retired
Country flag
When you only use a few tens of miles a day, is it really all that efficient to drag around a battery twenty times larger than the average daily commute?

-Crissa
No it isn't that efficient. But, you are using an average. So what about the people on the high end of that average?
 

cyberhunter

Well-known member
First Name
Heath
Joined
May 17, 2020
Messages
109
Reaction score
240
Location
Texas
Vehicles
2017 Ram 2500, Cybertruck preorder
Country flag
I think it is exciting that another EV looks to be getting great specs. The tech is what is keeping Tesla out front and others getting good specs only helps push the envelope. It will only push Tesla and other manufacturers to do even better. Like the article said, the real winner is the consumer. This may cause Tesla to give the CT 600 mile range by the time my Trimotor is ready for me. I'd love that.
 
OP
OP
TruckElectric

TruckElectric

Well-known member
First Name
Bryan
Joined
Jun 16, 2020
Messages
1,784
Reaction score
2,383
Location
Texas
Vehicles
Dodge Ram diesel
Occupation
Retired
Country flag
I think it is exciting that another EV looks to be getting great specs. The tech is what is keeping Tesla out front and others getting good specs only helps push the envelope. It will only push Tesla and other manufacturers to do even better. Like the article said, the real winner is the consumer. This may cause Tesla to give the CT 600 mile range by the time my Trimotor is ready for me. I'd love that.

I think that 600 mile Trimotor is going to happen.
 

Crissa

Well-known member
First Name
Crissa
Joined
Jul 8, 2020
Messages
5,948
Reaction score
7,820
Location
Santa Cruz
Vehicles
2014 Zero S, 2013 Mazda 3
Country flag
Certainly trucks need more battery capacity. For towing, jobsite use, etc.

-Crissa


No it isn't that efficient. But, you are using an average. So what about the people on the high end of that average?
Your commute would have to be eight times the national average to use up the range in an entire week.
 
Last edited:
OP
OP
TruckElectric

TruckElectric

Well-known member
First Name
Bryan
Joined
Jun 16, 2020
Messages
1,784
Reaction score
2,383
Location
Texas
Vehicles
Dodge Ram diesel
Occupation
Retired
Country flag
Certainly trucks need more battery capacity. For towing, jobsite use, etc.

-Crissa



Your commute would have to be eight times the national average to use up the range in an entire week.

You don't think that doesn't happen?

I don't get this "national average" anyway. Most people I know beat that so-called average. Depends on where you live and what you do for a living.

For me anyways my yearly average varies. Sometimes I travel more in one year as opposed to other years.

I guess for "some" people all they do is go back and forth to work and not much else. But I don't know that many people like that.
 

Crissa

Well-known member
First Name
Crissa
Joined
Jul 8, 2020
Messages
5,948
Reaction score
7,820
Location
Santa Cruz
Vehicles
2014 Zero S, 2013 Mazda 3
Country flag
You don't think that doesn't happen?
That you don't go somewhere with electricity for a week and need to commute every day? It's certainly very rare. Oil drillers and miners in the Alaskan wilderness?

I don't get this "national average" anyway. Most people I know beat that so-called average.
There's a reason that's a named fallacy.

I guess for "some" people all they do is go back and forth to work and not much else. But I don't know that many people like that.
Half or less of cars are used for more than that. And very few drive 500 miles without stopping to pee.

-Crissa

To be fair, I do drive like that several times a year. And I know others that do, too. Just wish there were four more Leafs on the road than one Lucent prototype.
 
Last edited:
OP
OP
TruckElectric

TruckElectric

Well-known member
First Name
Bryan
Joined
Jun 16, 2020
Messages
1,784
Reaction score
2,383
Location
Texas
Vehicles
Dodge Ram diesel
Occupation
Retired
Country flag
Half or less of cars are used for more than that. And very few drive 500 miles without stopping to pee.

Ok, the 500 mile thing first. You have to realize the 500 mile range is under ideal conditions. If you are traveling, are you really going to count on ideal conditions? Maybe south Florida where its flat as a pancake.

Let's say you are traveling from Texas to Montana. It's unlikely you will meet any ideal conditions along the way. And, maybe I don't want to go the route for the Supercharger network. If I have a 500-600 mile range it may allow me to take a quicker route and save a few hours travel time.


I know Elon has mentioned about the efficiency thing but he is going to have to come back to earth every once in awhile. What he needs to understand is he is trying to sell EV's, not a prescription for a lifestyle. If Tesla doesn't offer what the consumer wants(more range), there will be someone else that will offer it.
 
Last edited:

TyPope

Well-known member
First Name
Ty
Joined
Mar 31, 2020
Messages
601
Reaction score
656
Location
Papillion, NE
Vehicles
2013 Ford F350 Platinum, 2010 Toyota Prius, 2021 Tesla Cybertruck (reserved)
Occupation
Nuclear Operations Analyst
Country flag
When you only use a few tens of miles a day, is it really all that efficient to drag around a battery twenty times larger than the average daily commute?

-Crissa
Hmm... makes sense but I'm not going to put 1/4 gallon of gas in my Prius every day.
 

Newton

Well-known member
First Name
Newton
Joined
Apr 2, 2020
Messages
758
Reaction score
925
Location
East Bay Area, CA
Vehicles
p̶r̶i̶u̶s̶ c̶,̶ y̶o̶t̶a̶ p̶i̶c̶k̶u̶p, ⼕丫⻏🝗尺セ尺ㄩ⼕长
Country flag
Hmm... makes sense but I'm not going to put 1/4 gallon of gas in my Prius every day.
but u are home everyday to plug it in.

This appears to be one of those low volume high price cars. im guessing over 100k,
So really anything is an option and not really comparable to any normal car i think.

I find it insane the amount people pay for teslas. over 100k for the Model x! 90% of the time i see a woman driving it alone, or the the store with a kid.

this is super car prices, so I would expect super car specs, whether thats speed, range, styling, etc. or a combo.
 
Last edited:

TyPope

Well-known member
First Name
Ty
Joined
Mar 31, 2020
Messages
601
Reaction score
656
Location
Papillion, NE
Vehicles
2013 Ford F350 Platinum, 2010 Toyota Prius, 2021 Tesla Cybertruck (reserved)
Occupation
Nuclear Operations Analyst
Country flag
but u are home everyday to plug it in.

This appears to be one of those low volume high price cars. im guessing over 100k,
So really anything is an opinion and not really comparable to any normal car i think.

I find it insane the amount people pay for teslas. over 100k for the Model x! 90% of the time i see a woman driving it alone, or the the store with a kid.

this is super car prices, so I would expect super car specs, whether thats speed, range, styling, etc. or a combo.
True. I mean, Tesla vehicles do have supercar acceleration or at least really close to it. I'd like to point out that my last truck was of the $80k+ variety and while it was a gorgeous Ruby Red Pearl color, it wasn't exactly super styling or fast. High-end vehicles are expensive, that's for sure. I can't see paying $100k for a Model X but there are quite a few who do. I figure I'll be out about $85K for my Cybertruck when it finally gets built... The Lucid Air is going to be expensive and I suppose if I were in the market for an expensive car, I'd want to NEVER have to worry about the range regardless of what I was doing. It'd be nice to know I could go away for a month and fly back to the airport and my car would still have enough charge to get me home. The only time I've had range anxiety with our Model Y was when it spent a week not moving at the paint shop... 9 days, actually (their painter was sick). The car dropped down to 36% and I was getting concerned enough that I called the shop and asked them to plug it in. They did. With 500-600 miles of range, those parasitic losses wouldn't have added up to such a high percentage of battery and I wouldn't have had to worry so much. That piece of mind is the biggest thing I get from increased range.
 

Crissa

Well-known member
First Name
Crissa
Joined
Jul 8, 2020
Messages
5,948
Reaction score
7,820
Location
Santa Cruz
Vehicles
2014 Zero S, 2013 Mazda 3
Country flag
Bigger batteries do have longer times they can sit around, that is true.

But if you're not plugging in you EV when you get home (and need that charge tomorrow) you're losing more time, later.

Better lots of little charges while you're sleeping than one big one while you wait.

Anyhow, this race for massive range seems silly. You'd have to plug it in at 30% or if it was cold out, anyhow. That bigger battery is just more weight to lug off from a stop light or stop in an emergency.

I wish lighter EVs got the same loving coverage.

-Crissa
 

Newton

Well-known member
First Name
Newton
Joined
Apr 2, 2020
Messages
758
Reaction score
925
Location
East Bay Area, CA
Vehicles
p̶r̶i̶u̶s̶ c̶,̶ y̶o̶t̶a̶ p̶i̶c̶k̶u̶p, ⼕丫⻏🝗尺セ尺ㄩ⼕长
Country flag
Bigger batteries do have longer times they can sit around, that is true.

But if you're not plugging in you EV when you get home (and need that charge tomorrow) you're losing more time, later.

Better lots of little charges while you're sleeping than one big one while you wait.

Anyhow, this race for massive range seems silly. You'd have to plug it in at 30% or if it was cold out, anyhow. That bigger battery is just more weight to lug off from a stop light or stop in an emergency.

I wish lighter EVs got the same loving coverage.

-Crissa
yea I think the real issue causing this want for massive range is the rarity of fast chargers. if they were even half as prevelant as gas stations, people wouldnt even think about range, but the fact is as of right now, its something you have to think about. '

I go pretty far quite often and having to add more thought energy into where, how long, what is it near, how much charge will I have, is just another addition that is something I never had to think about before.
 

MEDICALJMP

Well-known member
First Name
Jeff
Joined
Apr 28, 2020
Messages
960
Reaction score
1,770
Location
Omaha, NE
Vehicles
Toyota Avalon, Rav4, Tri-motor Cybertruck
Occupation
Nurse
Country flag
Most people like to travel interstate highways. Those of use who want to, or need to, drive the road less traveled need the extra range. Look through some of the threads here. The gentleman who is going to pick up his CT in Austin and drive it to Alaska. There are a lot of miles without a super charger or EV charge point in sight for that man. Lots of places in North and South Dakota are devoid of charging options. Now load up the CT with 3500 pounds of stuff in the bed or pull that horse trailer. Range anxiety is worse than running out of gas. You can always call AAA for an emergency gallon of petrol. You probably won't get the guy with a back up generator on his rig.

Go south/north of I-80 and you have a few hundred miles of EV desert. Now you spend a week camping. Parasitic losses, use of the CTs climate control to sleep in the bed, maybe power tools or a small refrigerator. I want every electron I can get.
 
Advertisement

 
Advertisement
Top