No Cybertruck Side Sails, for sure

Sirfun

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Whew, OK here I go again about sail storage. I grabbed a collection of images to visually go along with why there are many reasons that, even the latest prototype looks like there are access doors with sail storage. There looks to be a difference though. The original prototype had a small triangular door like they showed in the one photo during the reveal. All clues point to them increasing the size and having the whole rear quarter panels open as large doors almost like Falcon doors, allowing access to the whole side of the CT behind the rear passenger doors. (which BTW also don't have door handles also).

Photo #1 shows the gap above the rear passenger door that would be for the front of the sail storage door.

saildoor2.jpg


Photo #2 shows how the door overlaps the black material on top of the bed, so the door could be hinged on the inside and open along that angle over the black material. (If it isn't a door the black material would overlap the side).

saildoortop.jpg


Photo #3 is interesting because it shows how Tesla redesigned that bottom rear corner to be not a sharp 90 degree point that would be dangerous with the door open. Do to the angle of the top hinge the 90 degree corner near the passenger door would be high and out of the way.

saildoorbott.jpg


Photo #4 shows the original design, so you can see how sharp that bottom corner was, and how with that door being the small triangular shape wouldn't give access to the areas below there. BTW, with the Cybertuck having no wheel wells inside the bed, gives you some idea of how deep these storage areas will be. Why would you not want access to all that space?

saildoororig.jpg
 
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rr6013

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One of the more interesting unanswered questions - sail plane stowage. It will be telling how Tesla wants Cybertruck to evolve in its choice how it utilizes its exoskeleton for consumer value-adds.

Sail storage opportunity exists. Structurally, not the whole outer skin and no-way encompassing the top chord of the exoskeleton.

The top of the exoskeleton transfers load stresses. Stresses are transferred to the skin down/up from the bottom chord(platform). Torsional rigidity is sacrificed at every occurrence that interrupts those forces by cutting the chord load path.

…wishing what you want and what you see as proof-positive validating an assumption is not supported by the mfgr Tesla.
 

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C46201F6-EFD5-4CE2-B488-C821029C3BA3.jpeg

One of the more interesting unanswered questions - sail plane stowage. It will be telling how Tesla wants Cybertruck to evolve in its choice how it utilizes its exoskeleton for consumer value-adds.

Sail storage opportunity exists. Structurally, not the whole outer skin and no-way encompassing the top chord of the exoskeleton.

The top of the exoskeleton transfers load stresses. Stresses are transferred to the skin down/up from the bottom chord(platform). Torsional rigidity is sacrificed at every occurrence that interrupts those forces by cutting the chord load path.

…wishing what you want and what you see as proof-positive validating an assumption is not supported by the mfgr Tesla.
I've mentioned this before but I'll say it again for those that missed it; structurally its better if they use the straight wall inside the bed that can also sit directly on the rear bed cast. That in turn also stiffins the cast and distributes the bed load into the rest of the vehicle throughthe a frame.

Doing that means the rear part is in one peice, at full height, and just has the tie down track mounted on it, so the outside sail panel can be a thinner non-structural and open like a door. (Also an old post)

It's still "exoskeleton" in that section, but its just 180mm further back in the bed wall. It will also still be bullet proof, but maybe just not for the things you have in the sail storage, which is not really a loss.
 


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One of the more interesting unanswered questions - sail plane stowage. It will be telling how Tesla wants Cybertruck to evolve in its choice how it utilizes its exoskeleton for consumer value-adds.

Sail storage opportunity exists. Structurally, not the whole outer skin and no-way encompassing the top chord of the exoskeleton.

The top of the exoskeleton transfers load stresses. Stresses are transferred to the skin down/up from the bottom chord(platform). Torsional rigidity is sacrificed at every occurrence that interrupts those forces by cutting the chord load path.

…wishing what you want and what you see as proof-positive validating an assumption is not supported by the mfgr Tesla.
So, I realize this is the original prototype, with the door handles and original awesome tailgate, but if you zoom in, you can clearly see the panel gap for the sail, by the rear door handle. I find it hard to believe Elon would promise a CT that is better than the prototype, and then nix the sail storage. Not happening.
 

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Whew, OK here I go again about sail storage. I grabbed a collection of images to visually go along with why there are many reasons that, even the latest prototype looks like there are access doors with sail storage. There looks to be a difference though. The original prototype had a small triangular door like they showed in the one photo during the reveal. All clues point to them increasing the size and having the whole rear quarter panels open as large doors almost like Falcon doors, allowing access to the whole side of the CT behind the rear passenger doors. (which BTW also don't have door handles also).

Photo #1 shows the gap above the rear passenger door that would be for the front of the sail storage door.

saildoor2.jpg


Photo #2 shows how the door overlaps the black material on top of the bed, so the door could be hinged on the inside and open along that angle over the black material. (If it isn't a door the black material would overlap the side).

saildoortop.jpg


Photo #3 is interesting because it shows how Tesla redesigned that bottom rear corner to be not a sharp 90 degree point that would be dangerous with the door open. Do to the angle of the top hinge the 90 degree corner near the passenger door would be high and out of the way.

saildoorbott.jpg


Photo #4 shows the original design, so you can see how sharp that bottom corner was, and how with that door being the small triangular shape wouldn't give access to the areas below there. BTW, with the Cybertuck having no wheel wells inside the bed, gives you some idea of how deep these storage areas will be. Why would you not want access to all that space?

saildoororig.jpg
This would be epic. Someone posting a shot of an ICE truck with a similar design.

Im not sure we can really read too much into the prototypes though. But it would I think instantly catch the attention of every professional who uses their truck for work.
 

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So the charging door makes some pretty sharp angels and pointy bits. I would love to have storage in all those space but This would be a huge hit on structural integrity. Creating the need for a significant structure to bear the load and strengthen the framework especially if all that was hinged and hanging. I would be cool to see smaller compartments. The triangle of the sail makes more sense sine it does not have the transitional load that the lower side panel would have.

saildoororig (2).jpg
 

Sirfun

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So the charging door makes some pretty sharp angels and pointy bits. I would love to have storage in all those space but This would be a huge hit on structural integrity. Creating the need for a significant structure to bear the load and strengthen the framework especially if all that was hinged and hanging. I would be cool to see smaller compartments. The triangle of the sail makes more sense sine it does not have the transitional load that the lower side panel would have.

saildoororig (2).jpg
That's the first prototype. All the newer prototypes got rid of that door and relocated it into the black wheel arch.

chargeport.jpg
 
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rr6013

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I've mentioned this before but I'll say it again for those that missed it; structurally its better if they use the straight wall inside the bed that can also sit directly on the rear bed cast. That in turn also stiffins the cast and distributes the bed load into the rest of the vehicle throughthe a frame.

Doing that means the rear part is in one peice, at full height, and just has the tie down track mounted on it, so the outside sail panel can be a thinner non-structural and open like a door. (Also an old post)

It's still "exoskeleton" in that section, but its just 180mm further back in the bed wall. It will also still be bullet proof, but maybe just not for the things you have in the sail storage, which is not really a loss.
I get you see redundant dollars hanging off the side of the structural box you describe which are Tesla’s profits driving away for good. But 30”X” is the value proposition inherent in the whole Tesla Cybertruck product sale and reason d’être. The 3mm S.S. remains structural to the integrity of the product’s unique selling point, exoskeleton, in-use, in crash and in torsional rigidity.

Agreed, changing steel gauge at the outer skin recoups Tesla profit, but Tesla would be taking a savings at the expense of adding a 2nd metal to work, increased part complexity and increased mfg labor.

With no value-driven innovation pushing that outer skin reduction there is no customer buy-in incentive to own a Cybertruck clad in Pinto gauge steel.

These trucks will see 5th wheel trailers dropped on the box, shopping cart attacks, parking dings, backed into big immovable objects and <my fav>hit unseen dips/speed bumps fully loaded. Tin canning the frame is so unsightly when there exists only one stiffening bend.

Is it a worthy endeavor to put the entire product at Pinto-risk which stigma could attach to theTesla brand as FORD had to kill its product to save itself.
 

rr6013

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That's the first prototype. All the newer prototypes got rid of that door and relocated it into the black wheel arch.

chargeport.jpg
Begs redesign to avoid road deitrus, mud and frozen snow accumulation. Relocate to a cleaner access for everyone not dressed in overhauls, gloves and scraper in the leg pocket.

Reversed door swing down at leading edge while better; still would be a dirty gloves and rag routine kludgefixe.
 

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I get you see redundant dollars hanging off the side of the structural box you describe which are Tesla’s profits driving away for good. But 30”X” is the value proposition inherent in the whole Tesla Cybertruck product sale and reason d’être. The 3mm S.S. remains structural to the integrity of the product’s unique selling point, exoskeleton, in-use, in crash and in torsional rigidity.

Agreed, changing steel gauge at the outer skin recoups Tesla profit, but Tesla would be taking a savings at the expense of adding a 2nd metal to work, increased part complexity and increased mfg labor.

With no value-driven innovation pushing that outer skin reduction there is no customer buy-in incentive to own a Cybertruck clad in Pinto gauge steel.

These trucks will see 5th wheel trailers dropped on the box, shopping cart attacks, parking dings, backed into big immovable objects and <my fav>hit unseen dips/speed bumps fully loaded. Tin canning the frame is so unsightly when there exists only one stiffening bend.

Is it a worthy endeavor to put the entire product at Pinto-risk which stigma could attach to theTesla brand as FORD had to kill its product to save itself.
Hey rr6013

I get that there is meant to be a "exoskeleton" out of Stainless Steel, but the sail doors on the original CT were already not structural. Hence even there the interior bed side stainless steel wall was already the structural element. Further most of the load carrying is in the rear cast itself, where load is transferred from the bed into the rear suspension and wheels. This has not changed at all.

There is no point routing load forces through the rear sail walls at all really, except for distributing some load forces to the front, which in turn goes through a very "hollow" exoskeleton cabin area, seeing the doors themselves add no rigidity to the cabin frame, and like the sail doors, would just be hanging from some hinges and a lock as well. (Side intrusion forces are transferred to cabin frome on impact, but not before impact). The cabin is also supported by a structural battery pack. Even in the original protoype there was only the front and rear lower quarter panel as "exoskeleton". Everything else opened, except for the internal bed walls.

It is the combination of front and rear casts, structural battery pack, cabin frame, and "exoskeleton" that all together makes up the structural elements of the vehicle. Not just the exoskeleton component. One part holds the other, there is no exoskeleton acting as a frame for anything else.

As for dents ans scratches, you can still have 3mm SS on all the doors etc, so you can have it on the sails, or full side opening too. Question is if you need it there and can save some weight in different places. Safety is also a concern. No one said it was 3mm all around.

For example that 3mm frunk hood will be a nightmare for pedestrian protection and for frontal collisions if it doesn't crumple properly.
 

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C46201F6-EFD5-4CE2-B488-C821029C3BA3.jpeg

One of the more interesting unanswered questions - sail plane stowage. It will be telling how Tesla wants Cybertruck to evolve in its choice how it utilizes its exoskeleton for consumer value-adds.

Sail storage opportunity exists. Structurally, not the whole outer skin and no-way encompassing the top chord of the exoskeleton.

The top of the exoskeleton transfers load stresses. Stresses are transferred to the skin down/up from the bottom chord(platform). Torsional rigidity is sacrificed at every occurrence that interrupts those forces by cutting the chord load path.

…wishing what you want and what you see as proof-positive validating an assumption is not supported by the mfgr Tesla.
I hope you are right. Are you proposing something like this? or hinged more like the reveal photo on the website.

1656164989021.png
 

 
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