Rear steer - one more reason why it is a game changer = emergency collision avoidance

TickTock

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Rear steer is one of the key features of the CT IMO. The ability to navigate parking lots and narrow roads without having to either 1) drag the rear wheel over the curb or 2) swing the front end through oncoming traffic is a huge plus.

However, I always thought the in-phase rear steer at freeway speed was cool but I didn't really see it as a significant value-add. I mean, it really isn't a big deal if the car turns slightly when changing lanes right?

Others have probably already considered this and I am just slow to comprehend but this morning I just realized that this is extremely valuable when you consider emergency collision avoidance. If you have to urgently switch lanes to avoid hitting, say, a refrigerator that fell into the road, it is very difficult to manage without over-compensating and fish-tailing, if not outright flat spinning. With the rear steer, there is no rotational vector added so it seem like your chances of successfully avoiding the obstacle without ending up facing oncoming traffic increases significantly. Gimme my VIN already! It's a matter of life or death! ;-)
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Cboy7

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Rear steer is one of the key features of the CT IMO. The ability to navigate parking lots and narrow roads without having to either 1) drag the rear wheel over the curb or 2) swing the front end through oncoming traffic is a huge plus.

However, I always thought the in-phase rear steer at freeway speed was cool but I didn't really see it as a significant value-add. I mean, it really isn't a big deal if the car turns slightly when changing lanes right?

Others have probably already considered this and I am just slow to comprehend but this morning I just realized that this is extremely valuable when you consider emergency collision avoidance. If you have to urgently switch lanes to avoid hitting, say, a refrigerator that fell into the road, it is very difficult to manage without over-compensating and fish-tailing, if not outright flat spinning. With the rear steer, there is no rotational vector added so it seem like your chances of successfully avoiding the obstacle without ending up facing oncoming traffic increases significantly. Gimme my VIN already! It's a matter of life or death! ;-)
come to think of it, I have not seen a video of the 4 wheel steering hanging lanes at speed. Would be interesting
 

Woodrick

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come to think of it, I have not seen a video of the 4 wheel steering hanging lanes at speed. Would be interesting
I suspect that's because at high speeds, the angles of the wheels are imperceptible. They just don't move enough to see them, even with front-wheel only steering.

How far do you move the steering wheel when you change lanes at 75 mph? Less than an inch?
 


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TickTock

TickTock

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I suspect that's because at high speeds, the angles of the wheels are imperceptible. They just don't move enough to see them, even with front-wheel only steering.

How far do you move the steering wheel when you change lanes at 75 mph? Less than an inch?
The video I want to see is a comparison of Lightning, Rivian, Silverado, Cybertruck doing a emergency lane shift (in a big lot with lots of room to spin out).
 

CyberGus

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If you have to urgently switch lanes to avoid hitting, say, a refrigerator that fell into the road, it is very difficult to manage without over-compensating and fish-tailing
I hope to never test this
 

firsttruck

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It may not happen if there is no intention to sell the truck overseas, but a Moose Test would show us whether the 4WS helps in an avoidance maneuver!
Wait for overseas?? Is there now a Moose gap? Not enough moose in North America?


---------------------------------------------

In the United States alone, annually, there are approximately two million collisions with ungulates (like deer and moose), killing approximately 440 people, injuring about 59,000 people, and causing more than US$10 billion of economic loss. Collisions with moose are especially dangerous due to their large size and height.
2023 Jan 18

Avoiding moose collisions (U.S. National Park Service)
National Park Service (.gov)
https://www.nps.gov › articles › moose-collisions


---------------------------------------------

The Secret Life Of Moose ... Crossing Signs
Vermont Public | By Josh Crane
Published June 24, 2021
https://www.vermontpublic.org/programs/2021-06-24/the-secret-life-of-moose-crossing-signs

.....
The moose crossing signs might seem like a tease except, they’re actually meant to warn you of danger. Because of all the animals that might be tempted to cross a road, the last one you want to hit is a moose.

These notes from records kept by Vermont Game Warden get at why:

Sept. 27, 1985: East Haven. Young woman killed on Rt 114. The woman hit a big bull (approximately 1,000 lbs.) then veered into an oncoming pickup truck. Vehicles hit head on. Sept. 22, 2006: Traveling north on I-93 in Waterford approximately 11:00 p.m. Found dead in his 1995 Subaru, 500 feet off road. Two other motorists hit moose carcass in road. May 24, 2009: Killed on I-91 south, north of exit 24 in Sheffield. Collided with moose at approx 10:35 p.m. Moose went through the windshield.

These are huge, scary accidents. Yes, moose are big animals. But part of what makes them so dangerous is their behavior.

Here’s what you need to know, according to Nick Fortin, the head deer biologist at Vermont Fish & Wildlife:

“Unlike a deer, whose defense is to get the heck out of there, a moose’s defense is often to stand his ground, because it's bigger than most of the things that might try to eat it,” Nick says. “So, they're not really scared.”

“Not scared” means a speeding car with bright headlights is often not enough to startle Bullwinkle out of the middle of the road. Some moose won’t even bother turning their heads to look at an oncoming car, which means at night, a car’s headlights won’t reflect off their eyes, making them hard to see. Moose have much darker coloration than deer as well, adding to the visibility problem.

It’s a problem that Carl Brandon from Randolph experienced back in 2003. It was a Sunday night in July. Carl and his wife at the time, Ann, were driving on I-89. They were heading home to Randolph after attending a party in Thetford.

“So I rounded the curve, a slight curve to the right, at a crest of a little hill, and then it goes down into a dip,” Carl recalls. “And there were cars coming the other way. So my headlights were dipped. And all of a sudden, I say, ‘moose!’ And about a 10th of a second later, I hit the moose.”

Brace yourself ...

“And then I’m covered with moose guts — I went right between her legs,” Carl says. “And so she hit the windshield and the front of the roof, is where the moose hit. And so all the internal organs wound up inside the car. The rest of the moose went over the top.”

As gross as this sounds, it’s not all that unusual. Moose are so tall that a car will take its legs out from under it so it falls through the windshield and into the car, instead of bouncing off the front bumper. It leads to quite a mess.

“And we completely grossed out the ambulance people, because we were covered in moose guts,” he says. “And they thought I might have had a laceration on my head, because I had a lot of blood on my head. But it was moose blood, as it turned out.”

As it turned out, both Carl and Ann walked away with nothing more than a few scrapes and bruises. (And some moose guts, too.)

After Carl got cleaned up, he learned more of the details about what happened after the moose crashed through his windshield. Like how his car skidded across the I-89 median and both oncoming lanes of traffic, and how it barely missed an 18-wheeler before finally coming to rest about 100 feet off the opposite side of the road.

During our interview, I told Carl I had no idea how he was here, talking to me.

“Because I was driving a Saab," he said. "I mean, if we were in most other cars, we'd be dead. Not just injured, but dead."

As crazy as it sounds, Carl might be right. Saab, before it went out of business, was based in Sweden, the country with the highest density of moose of any country in the world. They have about 400,000 of them, which is about 200 times larger than the moose population in Vermont. This makes moose-car collisions a major problem: They have about 7,000 of them, and 10 to 12 human fatalities, every year.

So Swedish car manufacturers like Saab and Volvo have responded by reportedly running their vehicles through “moose crash tests.”

... see page for rest article ....

---------------------------------------------
 

CyberTruckeeTheOne

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I tend to over steer with it in sharp turns. But no bigly.

As to moose and deer, my sharp corners will have them skinned ready for bbq when I hit one -- front or rear it appears.
 


MountainPassPerformance

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Wait for overseas?? Is there now a Moose gap? Not enough moose in North America?


---------------------------------------------

In the United States alone, annually, there are approximately two million collisions with ungulates (like deer and moose), killing approximately 440 people, injuring about 59,000 people, and causing more than US$10 billion of economic loss. Collisions with moose are especially dangerous due to their large size and height.
2023 Jan 18

Avoiding moose collisions (U.S. National Park Service)
National Park Service (.gov)
https://www.nps.gov › articles › moose-collisions


---------------------------------------------

The Secret Life Of Moose ... Crossing Signs
Vermont Public | By Josh Crane
Published June 24, 2021
https://www.vermontpublic.org/programs/2021-06-24/the-secret-life-of-moose-crossing-signs

.....
The moose crossing signs might seem like a tease except, they’re actually meant to warn you of danger. Because of all the animals that might be tempted to cross a road, the last one you want to hit is a moose.

These notes from records kept by Vermont Game Warden get at why:

Sept. 27, 1985: East Haven. Young woman killed on Rt 114. The woman hit a big bull (approximately 1,000 lbs.) then veered into an oncoming pickup truck. Vehicles hit head on. Sept. 22, 2006: Traveling north on I-93 in Waterford approximately 11:00 p.m. Found dead in his 1995 Subaru, 500 feet off road. Two other motorists hit moose carcass in road. May 24, 2009: Killed on I-91 south, north of exit 24 in Sheffield. Collided with moose at approx 10:35 p.m. Moose went through the windshield.

These are huge, scary accidents. Yes, moose are big animals. But part of what makes them so dangerous is their behavior.

Here’s what you need to know, according to Nick Fortin, the head deer biologist at Vermont Fish & Wildlife:

“Unlike a deer, whose defense is to get the heck out of there, a moose’s defense is often to stand his ground, because it's bigger than most of the things that might try to eat it,” Nick says. “So, they're not really scared.”

“Not scared” means a speeding car with bright headlights is often not enough to startle Bullwinkle out of the middle of the road. Some moose won’t even bother turning their heads to look at an oncoming car, which means at night, a car’s headlights won’t reflect off their eyes, making them hard to see. Moose have much darker coloration than deer as well, adding to the visibility problem.

It’s a problem that Carl Brandon from Randolph experienced back in 2003. It was a Sunday night in July. Carl and his wife at the time, Ann, were driving on I-89. They were heading home to Randolph after attending a party in Thetford.

“So I rounded the curve, a slight curve to the right, at a crest of a little hill, and then it goes down into a dip,” Carl recalls. “And there were cars coming the other way. So my headlights were dipped. And all of a sudden, I say, ‘moose!’ And about a 10th of a second later, I hit the moose.”

Brace yourself ...

“And then I’m covered with moose guts — I went right between her legs,” Carl says. “And so she hit the windshield and the front of the roof, is where the moose hit. And so all the internal organs wound up inside the car. The rest of the moose went over the top.”

As gross as this sounds, it’s not all that unusual. Moose are so tall that a car will take its legs out from under it so it falls through the windshield and into the car, instead of bouncing off the front bumper. It leads to quite a mess.

“And we completely grossed out the ambulance people, because we were covered in moose guts,” he says. “And they thought I might have had a laceration on my head, because I had a lot of blood on my head. But it was moose blood, as it turned out.”

As it turned out, both Carl and Ann walked away with nothing more than a few scrapes and bruises. (And some moose guts, too.)

After Carl got cleaned up, he learned more of the details about what happened after the moose crashed through his windshield. Like how his car skidded across the I-89 median and both oncoming lanes of traffic, and how it barely missed an 18-wheeler before finally coming to rest about 100 feet off the opposite side of the road.

During our interview, I told Carl I had no idea how he was here, talking to me.

“Because I was driving a Saab," he said. "I mean, if we were in most other cars, we'd be dead. Not just injured, but dead."

As crazy as it sounds, Carl might be right. Saab, before it went out of business, was based in Sweden, the country with the highest density of moose of any country in the world. They have about 400,000 of them, which is about 200 times larger than the moose population in Vermont. This makes moose-car collisions a major problem: They have about 7,000 of them, and 10 to 12 human fatalities, every year.

So Swedish car manufacturers like Saab and Volvo have responded by reportedly running their vehicles through “moose crash tests.”

... see page for rest article ....

---------------------------------------------
Haha, no, sadly it doesn't have to do with moose per capita. Otherwise we would have to do a (Canada) Goose Avoidance Test here!

Decoding The Moose Test: The Biggest Winners And Losers
 

DumpsterFire

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Rear steer is one of the key features of the CT IMO. The ability to navigate parking lots and narrow roads without having to either 1) drag the rear wheel over the curb or 2) swing the front end through oncoming traffic is a huge plus.

However, I always thought the in-phase rear steer at freeway speed was cool but I didn't really see it as a significant value-add. I mean, it really isn't a big deal if the car turns slightly when changing lanes right?

Others have probably already considered this and I am just slow to comprehend but this morning I just realized that this is extremely valuable when you consider emergency collision avoidance. If you have to urgently switch lanes to avoid hitting, say, a refrigerator that fell into the road, it is very difficult to manage without over-compensating and fish-tailing, if not outright flat spinning. With the rear steer, there is no rotational vector added so it seem like your chances of successfully avoiding the obstacle without ending up facing oncoming traffic increases significantly. Gimme my VIN already! It's a matter of life or death! ;-)
@RollingRefrigerator you’re a menace! i hope you’re proud of yourself, sir…😂😂
 

firsttruck

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Haha, no, sadly it doesn't have to do with moose per capita. Otherwise we would have to do a (Canada) Goose Avoidance Test here!

Decoding The Moose Test: The Biggest Winners And Losers
Very interesting.

-------------------------------

Moose Test
The evasive manoeuvre test (Swedish: Undanmanöverprov; colloquial: moose test or elk test; Swedish: Älgtest, German: Elchtest) is performed to determine how well a certain vehicle evades a suddenly appearing obstacle. This test has been standardized in ISO 3888-2.[1]
Forms of the test have been performed in Sweden since the 1970s.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moose_test

.....
Ongoing testing
Swedish automotive magazine Teknikens Värld tests "hundreds of cars every year".[2] with the moose test. It publishes test results since 1983 on their website (http://www.teknikensvarld.se/ ).

....
Actual moose collision testing

Although the moose test itself is based on the avoidance of hitting an obstruction in the road, testing is also carried out on actual collision with animals in the road. Both Volvo and Saab have a tradition of taking moose crashes into account when building cars.[20]

The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute has developed a moose crash test dummy called "Mooses". The dummy (which is made with similar weight, centre of gravity and dimensions to a live moose) is used to simulate realistic moose collisions.

Australian car manufacturers use crash test kangaroo dummies for similar reasons.[21]

-------------------------------

Resultat i Teknikens Världs älgtest
Hur klarar din bil en kraftig undanmanöver? Ta del av Teknikens Världs lista över i vilken hastighet hundratals olika bilar klarar älgtestet.
(Results in Teknikens Värld's moose test How does your car cope with a sharp evasive maneuver? Take part in Teknikens Värld's list of the speed at which hundreds of different cars pass the moose test.
Moose test - list of the fastest and slowest cars)
By Mattias Rabe of Teknikens Värld magazine
http://www.teknikensvarld.se/algtest/

1712245468965-oh.png


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