Retractable Studded Tires

FutureBoy

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So I just found a new kind of winter tire. I was watching a video of a Tesla sliding down a hill in Glasgow. Was going to make a smart-aleck remark about traction control. But then I thought, "Wouldn't it be nice to have retractable studs so you could engage them in this kind of case for extra traction." And what do you know, retractable studs are maybe going to become a thing...



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FutureBoy

FutureBoy

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These would be really useful here in Western Washington where most of the time it doesn't snow but when it does the hills get enough to cause trouble but often the valleys do not. So half the time you are driving on slick ice and the other half you are driving on dry clear road. Plus lots of people like to drive up in the mountains for skiing or sight seeing. Would be nice to just engage the studs in those cases.
 
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FutureBoy

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On the other hand, it might be nice to have automatic chains for something like the CT. I've seen these on school busses and some trucks but I wonder how they are to drive with.

 

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Studless winter tires already do this: they have pits of a different polymer that sticks to ice. In snowy or icy conditions, the ice builds up on these pits and creates traction with little studs of ice, basically.

They work slightly less well than the best rainy-weather tires in rain, tho. But they exceed any all-season tires in ice. And some studded tires, But studded tires are bad in rain, too,

-Crissa
 

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I wonder if those Nokians would be legal in my jurisdiction where studs are outlawed (because they can damage roads).
 

akia123

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that was hilarious, love how clueless people are in ice. he should of just pressed a bit on accelerator and pointed it around the car.
 

Doug McAllister

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All they driver had to do is take his foot off the brake and he could have steered around the truck. You would think the had better snow drivers in Glasgow.
 

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Q Branch already invented those tires... I think they're in 'The Living Daylights"

I had a set of 255 Blizzaks on my V8 Audi, that thing ran doughnuts around my 2dr. Tahoe w/35 12.50 mudders. Winter specific tires are unbeatable in the snow.

When I was in Roveniemi I caught a vintage rally, fully studded Porsches flying around, so much roost.

Can't wait to see what 800hp with cyber tracks looks like.
 

SEER

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This looks great! I have a second set of wheels installed each winter with Hakka 9's https://www.nokiantires.com/tires/passenger-car/studded-tires/ and they're phenomenal on ice but the number of miles I drive where the studs are actually needed is a tiny fraction of my winter miles. Interesting that this video is six years old but is still the video on Nokian's website under "innovation". I hope they've made this "concept" viable.
https://www.nokiantires.com/innovat...d-s-first-winter-tire-with-retractable-studs/
 

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I have both types on my cars but I prefer unstudded modern winter tires. On a truck like CT even more so I think. I’ve had horrible unexpected experiences with studded tires in certain weather types. AWD (and torque vectoring?) and the weight of the CT helps uphill anyway.

Tesla wouldn’t be wrong in working on a finetuned winter mode which some ICE cars I have had in the past have.

The instant power and weight of a CT with studs on asphalt also has an environmental disadvantage.
 

Crissa

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All they driver had to do is take his foot off the brake and he could have steered around the truck. You would think the had better snow drivers in Glasgow.
Doesn't always work. Turning the wheel sometimes has the same effect as braking.

-Crissa
 

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That was someone you don't want driving on a snowy/icy road. Anyone with any ice/snow experience knows you DON'T lock the brakes, ever.

Traction control, no this is anti-lock brakes that didn't work. And, locking the steering did't help either. Never lock the wheels, gently try to roll and maneuver out of the path. The problem is once you get too much speed, as he did rolling downhill.... the lack of traction pretty much makes nothing possible but chaos. He needed to have decided what he was going to do, and begun doing that as the car just began to roll/slide. peace
 

LoPro

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That was someone you don't want driving on a snowy/icy road. Anyone with any ice/snow experience knows you DON'T lock the brakes, ever.

Traction control, no this is anti-lock brakes that didn't work. And, locking the steering did't help either. Never lock the wheels, gently try to roll and maneuver out of the path. The problem is once you get too much speed, as he did rolling downhill.... the lack of traction pretty much makes nothing possible but chaos. He needed to have decided what he was going to do, and begun doing that as the car just began to roll/slide. peace
I have just begun to get the hang of keeping the watt pedal in a bit to not accelerate or regen at all on the slippery turns up the mountains here. I’m getting used to the right pressure. It took a while for my reptile brain to stop instantly letting go of the watt pedal when slipping. Or when initially braking, immediately go to light pressure on the other pedal.

I mean, mostly the Model 3 corrects itself after a little slip but it’s uncomfortable for the wife and kids so I strive to drive correctly with regard to physics. (That sounded autistic (if that is allowed to say) but still 😀).

EDIT: When come to think of it they’re both “watt pedals” to some degree only opposite... 🤨 “Gas pedal” sounds wrong but it’s probably “accelerator” I was looking for.
 
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Roslyn

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Studless winter tires already do this: they have pits of a different polymer that sticks to ice. In snowy or icy conditions, the ice builds up on these pits and creates traction with little studs of ice, basically.

They work slightly less well than the best rainy-weather tires in rain, tho. But they exceed any all-season tires in ice. And some studded tires, But studded tires are bad in rain, too,

-Crissa
Thank you, Californian Crissa. I've learned (in northern British Columbia) that studded tires aren't nearly as useful as some people think. They're useful when there's a big dump of warm, sticky snow, when the snow is soft and thick enough that the studs have something to dig into. Compared to other places, we get LOTS of snow dumps, but hard-frozen roads are far more common. When the road surface is hard and icy (like in the video), studs can't dig in. If anything, they're causing unnecessary skids. 'Winter' or 'all-weather' tires have a rubbery surface that grabs onto a hard road surface, giving far better traction, including on rain-slicked roads.
 

Crissa

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Thank you, Californian Crissa.
I grew up in the Pacific Northwest in the rain forest! CBC Stereo was my favorite radio station. California has places that get snow like that, too, feet upon feet when it dumps. The West coast is full of climactic zones!

But I live in the redwoods now, I have used my winter tires only once every few years. Lent them to a friend who drove a first generation Leaf from here to Vancouver, BC mid-winter, tho! They've seen snow ^-^

-Crissa
 
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