Should Cybertruck Camping Mode Have Self-Level Feature?

Do you think this would be a feature worth having?


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spencera

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The Cybertruck should use it's dynamic air suspension to self-level on uneven and sloped surfaces when in camping mode, this would make car camping in many places a lot more comfortable.

Tweeted at Elon but I don't think he saw it :(






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TalSet

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Can air suspension self level the car on each wheel or can it only make the front 2 wheels and the back 2 wheels up and down?
 

Newton

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I want it, but also never been something I needed while truck camping.
I like the idea some1 came up with of being able to change a tire via independent air suspension.
 

OneLapper

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The Cybertruck should use it's dynamic air suspension to self-level on uneven and sloped surfaces when in camping mode, this would make car camping in many places a lot more comfortable.

Tweeted at Elon but I don't think he saw it :(

The air suspension would need suspension height sensors (or old fashion height control valves, which I can't imagine Tesla using on the CT, but likely using on the Semi) on each of the four wheels to do this, -OR-, an electronic means (G-sensor) to measure the pitch/yaw of the vehicle. The later is probably less expensive than four physical sensors.

The suspension air system would also need four individually operated air valves to each air shock/strut assembly. Presumably the CT will have this if it lacks proper sway bars (which is unknown as this time).

Lastly, the CT would need the self leveling in camping/parking mode feature programmed into it's logic. I'm no programmer but I would think this wouldn't be too difficult to do.

There are many high end Prevost coaches that can do exactly this at the press of a button. Albeit, they use height control valves and numerous Norgren valves, making it essentially a mechanical system.

In short, I think it's possible that the CT will have the needed hardware to do this, and I think it's likely to have a G-sensor since it's likely that the UI has an offroad/inclination graphic display as, say, BMW has in their SUVs.

I would bet that this feature will be included in a OTA update later into production, if all of the above are present in the CT.
 

egandalf

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I'm not very experienced in overlanding or rock climbing off-road (we have plenty of backroads that I drive in my Toyota). I would assume, however, that a gyroscopic level sensor and independent wheel height control would be game-changingly beneficial in all types of off roading.

No idea what that means mechanically, but as a software developer getting a read from one (or more) sensors and applying logic to a motor (stepper, servo, etc.) is ridiculously easy to do at a high response rate (10s of milliseconds or less).

Given Tesla's software-oriented history, I would definitely assume they would take that approach if they go this route at all. A gyro sensor (or two) for sensing omnidirectional tilt and independently controlled suspension at each wheel would be simple from a software side, provided the mechanics are supportable at scale and at this price point.
 
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spencera

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I'm not very experienced in overlanding or rock climbing off-road (we have plenty of backroads that I drive in my Toyota). I would assume, however, that a gyroscopic level sensor and independent wheel height control would be game-changingly beneficial in all types of off roading.

No idea what that means mechanically, but as a software developer getting a read from one (or more) sensors and applying logic to a motor (stepper, servo, etc.) is ridiculously easy to do at a high response rate (10s of milliseconds or less).

Given Tesla's software-oriented history, I would definitely assume they would take that approach if they go this route at all. A gyro sensor (or two) for sensing omnidirectional tilt and independently controlled suspension at each wheel would be simple from a software side, provided the mechanics are supportable at scale and at this price point.

Does anyone know if Tesla's currently have sensors that would allow for this?
 

OneLapper

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Does anyone know if Tesla's currently have sensors that would allow for this?
If the CT has "active" suspension, then the system will need to know, and to a very precise degree, where the suspension is in relation to it's stroke. And on all four corners
 

Bigvbear

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I'm not very experienced in overlanding or rock climbing off-road (we have plenty of backroads that I drive in my Toyota). I would assume, however, that a gyroscopic level sensor and independent wheel height control would be game-changingly beneficial in all types of off roading.

No idea what that means mechanically, but as a software developer getting a read from one (or more) sensors and applying logic to a motor (stepper, servo, etc.) is ridiculously easy to do at a high response rate (10s of milliseconds or less).

Given Tesla's software-oriented history, I would definitely assume they would take that approach if they go this route at all. A gyro sensor (or two) for sensing omnidirectional tilt and independently controlled suspension at each wheel would be simple from a software side, provided the mechanics are supportable at scale and at this price point.
there are sensors that do this electronically. We use something in aviation called AHRS (Altitude Heading Reference System) sensors which tell us altitude, pitch, yaw, direction and speed. in a small sensor about the size of a watch battery. There is a simpler version of this in most smartphones so when you turn your phone 90 degrees the sensor detects the change in orentation and your screen rotates.

obviously some of that is overkill in the CT, but it would be an easy sensor to integrate. With that you can set an X and Y axis as "level" and tell the suspension to maintain that. I don't think it would be a complex system at all if you just had the CT inflate or deflate the appropriate airbag on the suspension.
 

Jhodgesatmb

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In order for cargo/tow load management, or for off roading, To work the air suspension already needs to have these sensors.
 

Newton

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