Snow & ice -- how will RWD Cybertruck single motor perform?

maconjt

Active member
First Name
Jeff
Joined
Jun 10, 2020
Threads
10
Messages
40
Reaction score
86
Location
Iowa
Vehicles
Hoping to be a Cybertruck owner.
Occupation
FMEA Coordinator
Country flag
I thought I posed this question earlier, but it doesn't look like it.

I have a reservation for the single motor mainly because I will be financing the vehicle and don't want a huge payment.

I live in Iowa and I'm wondering how the single motor will do in the snow and ice since it will be rear wheel drive and till have a lot of torque. I figured I could just throw a bunch of sandbags in the back if it slides around too much on the snow and ice like must people do with rear wheel drive vehicles in Iowa....lol.

Thoughts?
Sponsored

 

John K

Well-known member
First Name
John
Joined
Jan 2, 2020
Threads
41
Messages
2,803
Reaction score
5,768
Location
Los Angeles
Vehicles
Volt, CT reserve day 2
Country flag
Battery weight is a plus, less wheels turning is always a negative issue. Can you get away without using chains, probably similar to other heavy rear wheel drive vehicles. Though, you will not need to hold back a high ice idle potentially losing grip at low speeds. Lots of unknowns. When time comes to fill your order, hopefully there will be useful data so you may finalize your trim decision.
 

larryboy31

Well-known member
First Name
larry
Joined
Apr 29, 2020
Threads
5
Messages
93
Reaction score
163
Location
springfield NE
Vehicles
2001 Dodge turbo diesel ext. cab,2016 Nissan versa, 2021 Subaru cross trek
Occupation
retired
Country flag
Battery weight is a plus, less wheels turning is always a negative issue. Can you get away without using chains, probably similar to other heavy rear wheel drive vehicles. Though, you will not need to hold back a high ice idle potentially losing grip at low speeds. Lots of unknowns. When time comes to fill your order, hopefully there will be useful data so you may finalize your trim decision.
I have a Dodge diesel RWD with limited slip rear end. With weight in the bed I get around pretty well. Empty, not so much. It is my understanding that the single motor will send the power to the wheel with the most traction. If so you will be in good shape.
 

VolklKatana

Well-known member
First Name
Aaron
Joined
Dec 17, 2019
Threads
47
Messages
442
Reaction score
882
Location
Madison, WI
Website
ts.la
Vehicles
2019 Tesla M3 LR AWD FSD, CT3 reserved
Occupation
Data Architect
Country flag
Wisconsin resident and single motor Model S owner here. It's not much different than any other RWD car to be honest, with the additional note that the traction control, I feel, works much better than other vehicles. Is it better than my Silverado was, yes. Is it better than a FWD or AWD vehicle? Definitely not. As with most other vehicles, I really think tires would make a considerable difference.
 

android04

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 28, 2020
Threads
2
Messages
308
Reaction score
608
Location
Crete, NE
Vehicles
2018 Tesla Model 3 LR RWD, Tesla Cybertruck Tri-motor (reserved)
Country flag
Tires make a huge difference, and so will the weight distribution (which is currently unknown for the Cybertruck). I live in Nebraska and have driven my Model 3 LR RWD since April 2018 and about 70,000 miles. I feel that my car does great in ice and snow, but I have always used winter tires in the winter with it. Other things that help are the weight distribution on my model (47% front / 53% rear) and Tesla's traction control. You can floor the accelerator pedal on ice or snow and the car will not just burn out, but will gradually accelerate based on the traction it has. The possible things that could cause me problems are driving in snow that is deeper than 6" or I drive into a ditch. I've actually driven in snow deeper than 6" a few times, and snow flies up and over the windshield as the front end of the car "cuts" the snow and flings it up. Depending on the type of snow and if there's ice under it, you might be fine. Or might be fine until you stop and might not be able to get moving again.

I'd say tires are the most important part unless you live in an area where there are a lot of hills. Then having AWD/4WD would be beneficial as well.
 
Last edited:


Bill906

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 21, 2020
Threads
4
Messages
1,381
Reaction score
3,213
Location
Wisconsin
Vehicles
Jeep
Country flag
Reading this thread I just thought of something I hadn’t thought of before. I wonder how a RWD (rear wheel drive) vehicle with AWS (All Wheel Steering) will handle on slippery surfaces. This is assuming AWS will be standard on all CT’s. I realize we don’t know that. We also don’t know exactly how the truck will steer the rear wheels in different situations. I’m picturing stopped at a stop sign on a city street where the snow plow just cleared the cross road you are turning right onto, putting a small snowbank in your path that you must concur from a full stop. Cross traffic doesn’t have a stop sign and it’s a busy road. Will the truck steer the rear wheels opposite direction as the front? If they spin (not enough traction to break through snow pile) will it cause the vehicle to act differently than if the rear wheels remained straight? Will the truck change the steering angle if it detects spinning?

I went to college in a very snowy and hilly town. I drove an ‘86 Buick Regal -rear wheel drive, no weight in the back, V8 in the front. All season tires that had “ok” tread. I was VERY good at driving that car. I knew exactly when the rear wheels would break friction and would vary the throttle and steering accordingly. Some days that car was going sideways more than it was going forward. But I was good at controlling it even when it was sliding. Never got into an accident. I never understood the phase “Steer into the skid”. Instead I would say no matter what the back wheels are doing, always point the front wheels in the direction you want the car to go. I wonder how much added complexity 4 wheel steering would have in controlling that vehicle.
 

Crissa

Well-known member
First Name
Crissa
Joined
Jul 8, 2020
Threads
126
Messages
15,915
Reaction score
26,600
Location
Santa Cruz
Vehicles
2014 Zero S, 2013 Mazda 3
Country flag
EVs (especially Tesla) has a bunch of advantages:

  • Weight distribution. Battery pack means even, low weight which is easier to control. It's also more weight, which is good in snow and ice generally.
  • Instant response for traction control. Electric drive motors respond instantly and have exactly the torque needed. (They can also spin out of control, but that's without traction control.)

Cybertruck will also have:
  • Rear wheel steering
  • Adjustable ride height to balance the load
  • Full traction control and cameras for situational awareness

So it will probably be alot better than your standard rear-wheeled truck. Probably even better than traditional FWD cars.

-Crissa

PS: Steer into the skid is a method to regain control by getting the wheels rotating in relation to the car's motion. If the tires 'catch' while they're turned away from the direction of travel, that will often precipitate a high-side or overturn.
 

Jhodgesatmb

Well-known member
First Name
Jack
Joined
Dec 1, 2019
Threads
63
Messages
4,689
Reaction score
6,869
Location
San Francisco Bay area
Website
www.arbor-studios.com
Vehicles
Tesla Model Y LR, Tesla Model 3 LR
Occupation
Retired AI researcher
Country flag
I grew up in Michigan winters and didn't have a 4x car until I was in college. We stayed out of trouble with ground clearance and knowing how to drive in white and slippery stuff. Given how well the other Teslas perform in wintery conditions, and given the huge ground clearance advantage of the Cybertruck, there is a good chance it will be fine.
 

Tinker71

Well-known member
First Name
Ray
Joined
Aug 8, 2020
Threads
82
Messages
1,470
Reaction score
1,964
Location
Utah
Vehicles
1976 electric conversion bus
Occupation
Project Manager
Country flag
I thought I posed this question earlier, but it doesn't look like it.

I have a reservation for the single motor mainly because I will be financing the vehicle and don't want a huge payment.

I live in Iowa and I'm wondering how the single motor will do in the snow and ice since it will be rear wheel drive and till have a lot of torque. I figured I could just throw a bunch of sandbags in the back if it slides around too much on the snow and ice like must people do with rear wheel drive vehicles in Iowa....lol.

Thoughts?
Without hills you should be fine. You should be able to stop and turn as well as anybody on ice. So many people are overconfident in AWD. AWD will help in the snow though.
 


HaulingAss

Well-known member
First Name
Mike
Joined
Oct 3, 2020
Threads
8
Messages
4,128
Reaction score
8,747
Location
Washington State
Vehicles
2010 F-150, 2018 Model 3 Perform, FS Cybertruck
Country flag
I thought I posed this question earlier, but it doesn't look like it.

I have a reservation for the single motor mainly because I will be financing the vehicle and don't want a huge payment.

I live in Iowa and I'm wondering how the single motor will do in the snow and ice since it will be rear wheel drive and till have a lot of torque. I figured I could just throw a bunch of sandbags in the back if it slides around too much on the snow and ice like must people do with rear wheel drive vehicles in Iowa....lol.

Thoughts?
The RWD Cybertruck will blow the doors off ICE RWD pickups in the snow and ice due to more weight over the drive wheels (battery) and no heavy high-mounted engine up front. Driving on snow and ICE is largely a matter of tires and weight distribution. The weight distribution of Cybertruck will excel and you are in control of tire selection so if you would be satisfied with a RWD ICE pickup, you will be thrilled with the snow and ice handling of the Cybertruck. If you want to be able to climb steep ICY hills, you will want winter tires and AWD.
 

rr6013

Well-known member
First Name
Rex
Joined
Apr 22, 2020
Threads
54
Messages
1,680
Reaction score
1,619
Location
Coronado Bay Panama
Website
shorttakes.substack.com
Vehicles
1997 Tahoe 2 door 4x4
Occupation
Retired software developer and heavy commercial design builder
Country flag
I thought I posed this question earlier, but it doesn't look like it.

I have a reservation for the single motor mainly because I will be financing the vehicle and don't want a huge payment.

I live in Iowa and I'm wondering how the single motor will do in the snow and ice since it will be rear wheel drive and till have a lot of torque. I figured I could just throw a bunch of sandbags in the back if it slides around too much on the snow and ice like must people do with rear wheel drive vehicles in Iowa....lol.

Thoughts?
CT RWD is the best damn truck for the money. Where it falls short of CT AWD is in battery size, crawling and mud.

CT RWD in snow, only difference from AWD is the tendency of the lighter frontend to get pushed. There are tires and a frunk to counter that.

CT RWD fails on ice. Parked on ice same as ICE RWD. Climbing a snowpacked iced hill, black ice, ditto… Tesla traction control sounds like the bees knees on highway ice~y roads.

CT RWD fails in deep mud. Where 16” clearance helps for snow dumps, it can’t do a damn thing in midwest gumbo, deep(10-20”) mud ruts that without chains on the front even std 4x4 won’t drag their sorry ass thru.

Cybertruck electronic traction control and EV motor torque will tease false confidence until the limits of its abilities teach what is the impossible. No one knows. There @VolklKatana wisdom rings true to this born & raised Sioux City midwesterner.

And Yes. Suzuki’s lightweight; Samurai will embarrass Cybertrucks with its 4x4 prowess just sayin’
 

Bill906

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 21, 2020
Threads
4
Messages
1,381
Reaction score
3,213
Location
Wisconsin
Vehicles
Jeep
Country flag
Hmm, this thread has me asking another question. What do we thing the front to back weight distribution will be for the CT? I've always been under the impression that, in general, the best distribution is 50-50. Someone correct me if that isn't true. If true, the next question is, Is the CT distributed 50-50 when empty? Or is it designed front heavy / rear light so that when you add payload to the rear it becomes 50-50?

DIscuss...
Sponsored

 
 




Top