So you think Cybertruck can't crumple...

Crissa

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We've talked about this before: That the super-hard stainless steel will, in fact, crumple. The forces in a collision are many, many times more than a sledgehammer can put out. Now, everyone remembers the steel for the Cybertruck uses the same steel as in the Starship from SpaceX, right? Well, one of their ships was involved in a collision.
F58078DC-0E8B-466E-9DE4-D24DE058376D.jpeg

Photo: aBocaChicaGal https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=52398.162 post 162

As you can see, the winglet took the brunt of SN9's collision when it fell over. They just took it off and put on SN10's winglet, and plan to fly it in the next couple weeks.

The steel is hard, but it's still steel. It will bend before it breaks. It can make curves but, as you can see, they're much too large to use on the Cybertruck. Maybe some future manufacturing process, but for today, origami will be the fastest way to work with the material. It's very easy to put in scoring - places for it to bend at x so that it fails very reliably at the right places, or is exactly the right angle you want. Stamping steel actually doesn't actually have the same high tolerances as folding it this way!

I thought this was very interesting to share, especially since it'll be so long until we see a Cybertruck fender-bender. So here it is ^-^

-Crissa

 

Jhodgesatmb

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We've talked about this before: That the super-hard stainless steel will, in fact, crumple. The forces in a collision are many, many times more than a sledgehammer can put out. Now, everyone remembers the steel for the Cybertruck uses the same steel as in the Starship from SpaceX, right? Well, one of their ships was involved in a collision.
F58078DC-0E8B-466E-9DE4-D24DE058376D.jpeg

Photo: aBocaChicaGal https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=52398.162 post 162

As you can see, the winglet took the brunt of SN9's collision when it fell over. They just took it off and put on SN10's winglet, and plan to fly it in the next couple weeks.

The steel is hard, but it's still steel. It will bend before it breaks. It can make curves but, as you can see, they're much too large to use on the Cybertruck. Maybe some future manufacturing process, but for today, origami will be the fastest way to work with the material. It's very easy to put in scoring - places for it to bend at x so that it fails very reliably at the right places, or is exactly the right angle you want. Stamping steel actually doesn't actually have the same high tolerances as folding it this way!

I thought this was very interesting to share, especially since it'll be so long until we see a Cybertruck fender-bender. So here it is ^-^

-Crissa
We've talked about this before: That the super-hard stainless steel will, in fact, crumple. The forces in a collision are many, many times more than a sledgehammer can put out. Now, everyone remembers the steel for the Cybertruck uses the same steel as in the Starship from SpaceX, right? Well, one of their ships was involved in a collision.
F58078DC-0E8B-466E-9DE4-D24DE058376D.jpeg

Photo: aBocaChicaGal https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=52398.162 post 162

As you can see, the winglet took the brunt of SN9's collision when it fell over. They just took it off and put on SN10's winglet, and plan to fly it in the next couple weeks.

The steel is hard, but it's still steel. It will bend before it breaks. It can make curves but, as you can see, they're much too large to use on the Cybertruck. Maybe some future manufacturing process, but for today, origami will be the fastest way to work with the material. It's very easy to put in scoring - places for it to bend at x so that it fails very reliably at the right places, or is exactly the right angle you want. Stamping steel actually doesn't actually have the same high tolerances as folding it this way!

I thought this was very interesting to share, especially since it'll be so long until we see a Cybertruck fender-bender. So here it is ^-^

-Crissa
Are the engines attached to the vehicle? I ask because back when I worked as an aerospace engineer there was an incident at Vandenburg where a gantry accidentally hit a delta vehicle. It didn’t do any visible damage but the Air Force wanted us (Rocketdyne) to do a high cycle fatigue analysis to see if the engines were ok for launch. Something as severe as this photograph would worry any engine designer, and so it wouldn’t be just a cut and paste operation.

Was there really anyone that thought 1/8” stainless would be impervious to accidents? I think it will do well against doors being opened hard against it, and maybe hitting it with a ladder or 2x4, but not a moving 3-ton vehicle.
 
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Crissa

Crissa

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The motors were on it, but they were at the fulcrum of the fall, so didn't experience the same forces as this wing. They run static firing tests before early flights.

-Crissa
 

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We've talked about this before: That the super-hard stainless steel will, in fact, crumple. The forces in a collision are many, many times more than a sledgehammer can put out. Now, everyone remembers the steel for the Cybertruck uses the same steel as in the Starship from SpaceX, right? Well, one of their ships was involved in a collision.
F58078DC-0E8B-466E-9DE4-D24DE058376D.jpeg

Photo: aBocaChicaGal https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=52398.162 post 162

As you can see, the winglet took the brunt of SN9's collision when it fell over. They just took it off and put on SN10's winglet, and plan to fly it in the next couple weeks.

The steel is hard, but it's still steel. It will bend before it breaks. It can make curves but, as you can see, they're much too large to use on the Cybertruck. Maybe some future manufacturing process, but for today, origami will be the fastest way to work with the material. It's very easy to put in scoring - places for it to bend at x so that it fails very reliably at the right places, or is exactly the right angle you want. Stamping steel actually doesn't actually have the same high tolerances as folding it this way!

I thought this was very interesting to share, especially since it'll be so long until we see a Cybertruck fender-bender. So here it is ^-^

-Crissa
Must've been one big pterodactyl bird collision!
 

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We've talked about this before: That the super-hard stainless steel will, in fact, crumple. The forces in a collision are many, many times more than a sledgehammer can put out. Now, everyone remembers the steel for the Cybertruck uses the same steel as in the Starship from SpaceX, right? Well, one of their ships was involved in a collision.
F58078DC-0E8B-466E-9DE4-D24DE058376D.jpeg

Photo: aBocaChicaGal https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=52398.162 post 162

As you can see, the winglet took the brunt of SN9's collision when it fell over. They just took it off and put on SN10's winglet, and plan to fly it in the next couple weeks.

The steel is hard, but it's still steel. It will bend before it breaks. It can make curves but, as you can see, they're much too large to use on the Cybertruck. Maybe some future manufacturing process, but for today, origami will be the fastest way to work with the material. It's very easy to put in scoring - places for it to bend at x so that it fails very reliably at the right places, or is exactly the right angle you want. Stamping steel actually doesn't actually have the same high tolerances as folding it this way!

I thought this was very interesting to share, especially since it'll be so long until we see a Cybertruck fender-bender. So here it is ^-^

-Crissa
What is the thickness of the starship wing skin vs CT?
 


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We've talked about this before: That the super-hard stainless steel will, in fact, crumple. The forces in a collision are many, many times more than a sledgehammer can put out. Now, everyone remembers the steel for the Cybertruck uses the same steel as in the Starship from SpaceX, right? Well, one of their ships was involved in a collision.
F58078DC-0E8B-466E-9DE4-D24DE058376D.jpeg

Photo: aBocaChicaGal https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=52398.162 post 162

As you can see, the winglet took the brunt of SN9's collision when it fell over. They just took it off and put on SN10's winglet, and plan to fly it in the next couple weeks.

The steel is hard, but it's still steel. It will bend before it breaks. It can make curves but, as you can see, they're much too large to use on the Cybertruck. Maybe some future manufacturing process, but for today, origami will be the fastest way to work with the material. It's very easy to put in scoring - places for it to bend at x so that it fails very reliably at the right places, or is exactly the right angle you want. Stamping steel actually doesn't actually have the same high tolerances as folding it this way!

I thought this was very interesting to share, especially since it'll be so long until we see a Cybertruck fender-bender. So here it is ^-^

-Crissa
I'd like to see the full crash tests when they are available.
 
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Crissa

Crissa

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Starship SN9 is fixed and rolling out to the launch pad now!

I wonder if they had to replace anything but linkages and the wing. 'Elonaerons' they're calling the winglets. But they also say things like 'Norminal' and 'F' when scrubs happen.

-Crissa

 

 
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