Tom Hersh

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There's gonna be single motor, dual motor and tri motor Cybertrucks ... no wait, there will not be a tri motor ... just a single, dual and quad variants ...

No quad reservations were ever taken, only single, dual and Tri ... but don't you stop believin in Santa ... ;-)

When Elon Musk announced the CT, I ordered a single motor version the next morning. I thought about it and thought, no I want the dual motor one...then I thought some more and the rumor started that the trimotor version would be offered first so I ordered that one. Then I heard that a quad motor one was being considered so I tried to order that but putting any of them on reserve was stopped by then so I couldn't order the quad. So I now have 3 versions on order each with a $100 down. I only want one and I wasn't able to put the other two on just the trimotor so it'll be a surprise to see what will happen? I certainly am not a dealer so I don't want three. Will I be able to get the single motor version replaced for the trimotor or the quad motor? That's what I want to do and keep my place that I reserved for the single. Actually that should happen because in reality I ordered a "hexamotor" version in total! Haha...just let me get one!
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Ogre

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When Elon Musk announced the CT, I ordered a single motor version the next morning. I thought about it and thought, no I want the dual motor one...then I thought some more and the rumor started that the trimotor version would be offered first so I ordered that one. Then I heard that a quad motor one was being considered so I tried to order that but putting any of them on reserve was stopped by then so I couldn't order the quad. So I now have 3 versions on order each with a $100 down. I only want one and I wasn't able to put the other two on just the trimotor so it'll be a surprise to see what will happen? I certainly am not a dealer so I don't want three. Will I be able to get the single motor version replaced for the trimotor or the quad motor? That's what I want to do and keep my place that I reserved for the single. Actually that should happen because in reality I ordered a "hexamotor" version in total! Haha...just let me get one!
Likely they will open the configurator in order people ordered, not based on any particular configuration. So your first “Single Motor” order will likely get you access to the configurator and you can order whatever truck you want.
 

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strange. I’m not at all a materials expert so no real surprise that I might be confused.

But if the steel can be “rolled” and “unrolled” like this, it would seem to also be press-able. My (poor) understanding is that EM’s purported strength (not “hardness”) reports would suggest the steel itself (not the presses) would fail at any material angle of pressing - basically like trying to fold a cracker.
Roll-hardened stainless steel can't be stamped in 3 dimensions but it can be rolled and bent in 2 dimensions.
 

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You are right of course, the exoskeleton is only a few bends per side and the door exterior is the same. Tesla 'could' stamp the thinner, inner sections but there won't be any stamping of the exoskeleton regardless of whether it is 'feasible' to do so. It isn't practical.
I think the inner portions of the exoskeleton will be stamped from stainless steel that is not hardened (or only partially hardened). I'm talking about the door jambs and what not.
 


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I think the inner portions of the exoskeleton will be stamped from stainless steel that is not hardened (or only partially hardened). I'm talking about the door jambs and what not.
There are likely to be a fair number of parts which don’t need to be hardened 3mm stainless and can be stamped. Not sure those will actually be stainless or if they will be some other painted metal.
 

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I think the inner portions of the exoskeleton will be stamped from stainless steel that is not hardened (or only partially hardened). I'm talking about the door jambs and what not.
Could be extruded and then welded sections as well. The superstructure of the cabin doesn't have much area because of all the glass, and resembles more the structure of a rollcage without the glass. Even the stamped cabin steel is still welded to the rest, so have jigs to pre-assemble and weld extrusions shouldn't take much more time. Unlike other rounded Teslas, the low poly shape allows straight sections to be used instead of being stamped into a curve to follow body shape.
 

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There are likely to be a fair number of parts which don’t need to be hardened 3mm stainless and can be stamped. Not sure those will actually be stainless or if they will be some other painted metal.
Very unlikely to be painted metal if it forms part of the exoskeleton because that is problematic when it comes time to join it to the hardened stainless steel. And painting it after it is joined would require masking. Avoiding the paintshop is one of the key advantages of the Cybertruck.
 

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Could be extruded and then welded sections as well. The superstructure of the cabin doesn't have much area because of all the glass, and resembles more the structure of a rollcage without the glass. Even the stamped cabin steel is still welded to the rest, so have jigs to pre-assemble and well extrusions should take much more time. Unlike other rounded Teslas, the low poly shape allows straight sections to be used instead of being stamped into a curve to follow body shape.
Yes, it doesn't have to be stamped, I imagine they will use some hydroforming too.
 


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Not all parts need to be welded to the exoskeleton, either.

-Crissa
Various types of welding and glueing are the industry standard methods of joining structural components, bolting is rarely used due to added weight and expense. Because it's problematic to weld or glue pre-painted parts, I doubt any of the exoskeleton will be painted steel.
 

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Various types of welding and glueing are the industry standard methods of joining structural components, bolting is rarely used due to added weight and expense. Because it's problematic to weld or glue pre-painted parts, I doubt any of the exoskeleton will be painted steel.
On the Model Y, they used structural adhesives and bolts to bond components to the rear assembly. The bolts were likely more to guide the parts in and secure them as the adhesive set.

Many of the places where traditional cars are welded, the Model Y is secured with structural adhesives. The Munro video shows them struggling to separate the parts with heat guns as the adhesives are super strong.
 

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On the Model Y, they used structural adhesives and bolts to bond components to the rear assembly. The bolts were likely more to guide the parts in and secure them as the adhesive set.

Many of the places where traditional cars are welded, the Model Y is secured with structural adhesives. The Munro video shows them struggling to separate the parts with heat guns as the adhesives are super strong.
Structural adhesive is "glue". It is applied before the vehicle goes in the dunk tank with zinc primer and gets painted.

The Model Y is not stainless steel and it get's dunked and painted. Please tell me how the Cybertruck chassis can have regular steel parts glued to it without sending it to the paint shop afterwards.
 

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Please tell me how the Cybertruck chassis can have regular steel parts glued to it without sending it to the paint shop afterwards.
Off the top of my head...
Mask off areas that will later be glued to the SS. Paint or send through dunk tank. Remove mask. Glue SS to spot that has no paint because it was masked.
I'm sure there are other/better ways. That's just off the top of my head.
 

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Tesla Cybertruck Stainless steel rolls spotted during delivery to Giga Texas today (9/20/22) ? 1663974220417-

On the Tesla website there is a very clear break in the panel there. That takes a little more wind out of the sails of the folks that are adamant that the exoskeleton is taking a majority of the stresses. You almost couldnt pick a more critical structural location to put a joint if it were carrying a lot of load. see the image attached.

The circular cutout in the corner is for stress-relief, and actually makes the intersection much stronger. https://www.quora.com/Why-do-ships-have-round-windows

Tesla Cybertruck Stainless steel rolls spotted during delivery to Giga Texas today (9/20/22) ? 2-Figure3-1




I imagine the exoskeleton is adhered to an internal body ferrous steel frame at this location with a structural adhesive.
1665178578285.png
If the Cybertruck exoskeleton is built over a steel BiW, I'll eat it.
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