DarinCT

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Wow. I'm sure all the research, calculations, and editing was significant. Well done.

When it came to battery size estimations ( @19:06 sorry on mobile no link ). I want the final estimation to be true

100 kWh for single motor
120 kWh for dual motor
200 kWh for triple motor

Then @nxt garage talks about road tire estimations. I wasn't clear why there were estimations for road tires...

Then, does this suggest replacing the theoretical Goodyear wrangler mt/r with comparable road tires would increase the range?
 

lancethibault

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A couple months back I was looking at getting solar installed (haven't done it yet), but I was doing the math based on a 200 kWh pack for my CT3. If this is the case, I think I'll go from spending about $200/mo in gas to about $50/mo in electric fuel. Based on the $0.108/kWh that our utility charges.
 

Jon Snow

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A couple months back I was looking at getting solar installed (haven't done it yet), but I was doing the math based on a 200 kWh pack for my CT3. If this is the case, I think I'll go from spending about $200/mo in gas to about $50/mo in electric fuel. Based on the $0.108/kWh that our utility charges.
A good rule is 1/3 the cost of gasoline if you are refuelling at home. Solar is a separate issue entirely and the economics depends on your site (orientation, shading, structure) and local utility rates and rules.
 

lancethibault

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A good rule is 1/3 the cost of gasoline if you are refuelling at home. Solar is a separate issue entirely and the economics depends on your site (orientation, shading, structure) and local utility rates and rules.
In my case it depended completely on the local cost of gas at the time which was $2.75/gal vs the utility rate at my house which is $0.108/kWh and I assumed 100% home charging. So over the course of a year it would average up to more then $50/mo due to road trips, camping, hunting. So the 1/3 rule is probably pretty close. Given the cheapness of our local electric rates and having the 1/3 rule probably work out, I'd assume those who pay more then $0.108/kWh would end up a bit over 1/3...maybe something closer to 1/2 saving. Then again...where the electricity cost more, the gas probably does too, so it might be a wash.
 

fritter63

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Then @nxt garage talks about road tire estimations. I wasn't clear why there were estimations for road tires...

Then, does this suggest replacing the theoretical Goodyear wrangler mt/r with comparable road tires would increase the range?
Tires contribute directly to rolling resistance. It's why you always see those endurance competition solar cars using bicycle tires. :)

The beefier, and wider the tire is (like a BFG Mud Terrain - oh oh oh oh oh ) will create more resistance than a set of "highway tires", with nice linear tread patterns.

yes, the tires will affect it. The tires they showed at the reveal would be horrible AFAIK for efficiency (not to mention cost a pretty penny and not last very long).

After leaving Colorado for Cali, I eventually replaced my BFG All-terrains (on the Ram) with regular road tires. They just weren't needed by the road conditions or my ego anymore. :cool:
 

DarinCT

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...

After leaving Colorado for Cali, I eventually replaced my BFG All-terrains (on the Ram) with regular road tires. They just weren't needed by the road conditions or my ego anymore. :cool:
What kind of mileage difference did you get? My ego would like serious-looking (and the occasional run to the mountain) tires but if the difference is significant - wtf that actually means I don't know - my ego might have to take a backseat.
 

Dids

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What kind of mileage difference did you get? My ego would like serious-looking (and the occasional run to the mountain) tires but if the difference is significant - wtf that actually means I don't know - my ego might have to take a backseat.
Kevlar tires typically have higher pressure... 50 to 80lbs psi. My tacoma 35psi. So I am not actually certain that they have higher rolling resistance. And those bicycle tires are over 100psi.
 

fritter63

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What kind of mileage difference did you get? My ego would like serious-looking (and the occasional run to the mountain) tires but if the difference is significant - wtf that actually means I don't know - my ego might have to take a backseat.
I don’t recall for sure, was 13 years ago. I think it might have been 1 mpg...which was 10% on that beast.🤪
 

Frank W

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Kevlar tires typically have higher pressure... 50 to 80lbs psi. My tacoma 35psi. So I am not actually certain that they have higher rolling resistance. And those bicycle tires are over 100psi.
My 07 4x4 access cab is 29lbs Front & rear
 

Crissa

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The video said 3% mpg, but that would of course vary. The more offroady the tires, the worse they are on road and the more rolling resistance they have (they're less round, for instance.)

-Crissa
 

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Would the difference in efficiency drop down if one kept the driving speed on roads to be at the same speed as driving off-road? Ex: rock climbing at <20 mph so compare the different tire types efficiency on roads at <20 mph. I’m guessing that there wouldn’t be as much heat generated so less softening of the tires and less tire shape deflection. So possibly less difference in tire efficiency?
 

Crissa

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Would the difference in efficiency drop down if...
No. You'd notice it less because every other component - like drag - would be lessened, but rolling resistance actually goes down with additional speed (his formula didn't show this but... It's even more complicated!) as the centrifugal 'force' pushes out on the tires. Then they heat up and that creates yet another increase in stickiness but a decrease in the stiffness... It's complicated!

But no, if a tire has higher rolling resistance, it pretty much always does. However, if you're ever spinning your tires without doing 'work' then that's waste, too.

-Crissa
 
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