Tesla Model S Plaid Fast Charging Results Amaze: Analysis

TruckElectric

Well-known member
First Name
Bryan
Joined
Jun 16, 2020
Messages
1,791
Reaction score
2,392
Location
Texas
Vehicles
Dodge Ram diesel
Occupation
Retired
Country flag
At a V3 Supercharger, it charges at 250 kW from 10% to 30% SOC.
Today we will take a look at the fast charging results of the brand new Tesla Model SPlaid that is expected to offer the best charging curve of any Tesla car so far.

One of the first Plaid cars on the road was recently tested at a V3 Supercharging station (250 kW) by MotorTrend, which allows us to analyze the performance and see whether there is a room for improvements.

According to the article, the test was conducted after preconditioning the battery and at an ambient temperature of 71°F (21°C).

Charging power vs state-of-charge (SOC)
The charging curve, while charging from 5% SOC to 95% SOC looks very good. After a while, power output quickly increases to the maximum of 250 kW at around 10% SOC, where it stays up to around 30% SOC. That's a really nice sight.

We guess that the peak charging rate is limited by the station, not by the car, and at least for a short period, the battery would be willing to accept more.

After 30% SOC, the power output gradually and very smoothly decreases, reaching 50 kW at about 87% SOC. Again, not bad.
img-tesla-model-s-plaid-2021-dcfc-power-20210622.png

State-of-charge (SOC) vs time
According to the article, the 5-95% SOC session took about 52 minutes. As MotorTrendprovides only a handful of data points, we did our best to estimate the time.
The estimated time from 20% to 80% SOC is about 27 minutes. Starting at 10% SOC would require 29 minutes.
Tesla says that 15 minutes should be enough to replenish 187 miles (301 km) of range and the data indicates very close results in narrow optimum charging window (if we apply EPA Highway range for the Plaid). We guess that it will probably easily be possible in a Model S Long Range with 19" wheels (noticeably higher EPA result).

According to the data, about 100 miles can be recharged in 7 minutes (10-40% SOC).
The chart below is only for illustrative purposes:
mg-tesla-model-s-plaid-2021-dcfc-soc-time-20210622.png

Average charging power vs state-of-charge (SOC)
The average power in the very important range from 20% to 80% SOC is 130 kW, which is 52% of the peak value. That's probably the highest value that we saw so far in a Tesla, but it's normal as the Model S has the highest battery capacity (compared to Model 3 Long Range).
esla-model-s-plaid-2021-dcfc-power-matrix-20210622.png

C-rate vs state-of-charge (SOC)
The peak C-rate* - charging power in relation to the total battery capacity of 100 kWh (just a guess) - is about 2.5C.
The average C-rate when charging from 20% to 80% SOC is 1.3C.
*C-rate tells us how the charging power relates to the battery pack capacity. For example: 1C is 1-hour charging power (current), when the power value in kW is equal to the battery pack capacity in kWh. 2C would be enough to recharge in half an hour.
The net battery capacity indicated in the article is 96.7 kWh, which would be about 97% of the total battery capacity.
img-tesla-model-s-plaid-2021-dcfc-c-rate-20210622.png

Range replenishing speed vs state-of-charge (SOC)
The rate of range replenishing depends on the energy consumption and the energy consumption depends on the use case. In the case of Model S Plaid with 21" wheels, we have official EPA numbers:
  • EPA Combined range
    Taking into consideration the EPA Combined range of 348 miles (560 km) and available battery capacity of 96.7 kWh, we can assume energy consumption of 278 Wh/mile (173 Wh/km). The effective average speed of range replenishing when charging from 20% to 80% SOC would be 7.8 miles/minute (12.5 km/minute).
  • EPA Highway range
    Taking into consideration the EPA Highway range of 341 miles (549 km) and available battery capacity of 96.7 kWh, we can assume energy consumption of 284 Wh/mile (176 Wh/km).
    The effective average speed of range replenishing when charging from 20% to 80% SOC would be 7.6 miles/minute (12.3 km/minute).
The results are very good and in the case of the Long Range AWD version with 19" wheels, it would be even better.
-plaid-2021-dcfc-range-replenishing-speed-20210622.png

Ultimate DC fast charging card
Here is our ultimate charging card for the Tesla Model S Plaid (2021) that shows the estimated time of charging to add a certain number of SOC percent points, average charging power, added energy and added range for listed SOC ranges. Click here to enlarge the image.
img-tesla-model-s-plaid-2021-ucc-20210622.png

The matrix above, might be helpful from the user perspective, but be aware that it's just an estimate from a particular test, with measure and calculation uncertainty probably above 5%. On top of that comes variation for individual case - car (version, age/battery state-of-health), charger, ambient and battery temperature, software version and more (including cabin heating/cooling during charging). Another thing is that the charging curve might shift when charging starts at a lower/higher SOC.

Now let's take a look at the Plaid against some other models like the Tesla Model 3, tested by InsideEVs' Tom Moloughney, and Hyundai Ioniq 5 tested in Europe by Battery Life.

Comparison of charging power
If we look at the charging curve, we can see that the new Model S appears to be much more capable than the Model 3 Long Range. Hyundai Ioniq 5 has a completely different charging curve.

-model-s-plaid-2021-dcfc-power-comparison-20210622.png

The average power in the 20-80% SOC window at 130 kW is much better than in the case of the Model 3 Long Range:

DC Fast Charging Comparison by InsideEVs
Model
[data source]
Drive /
Battery
(kWh)
Max
Power
Avg
Power
(20-80%)
2021 Tesla Model S Plaid
[MotorTrend]
AWD
100 kWh
250 kW130 kW
2021 Tesla Model 3 LR AWD (V3 SC)
[Tom Moloughney]
AWD
80 kWh
250 kW106 kW
2019 Tesla Model 3 LR AWD (V3 SC)
[Tom Moloughney]
AWD
75 kWh
250 kW113 kW
2021 Hyundai Ioniq 5 (72.6 kWh)
[Battery Life]
AWD
77 kWh
224 kW170 kW
Comparison of State-of-charge (SOC) vs time
The charging time of the new Model S in the 20-80% SOC window (estimated at 27 minutes) probably is slightly longer than in the case of the Model 3 Long Range (24-26 minutes).

Comparison of C-rate
An interesting thing is the C-rate chart, as it reveals that the battery in the new Model S is not under as high a peak load as in the Model 3 Long Range.

Model S uses cylindrical 18650-type cells, while the Model 3/Y uses newer 2170-type, which might be one of the reasons.

The other reason is that the new Model S is limited by the station/software and clearly could go higher than 250 kW. At 300 kW, it would be in the 3C club as well.

model-s-plaid-2021-dcfc-c-rate-comparison-20210622.png

A little bit of summary:

DC Fast Charging Comparison by InsideEVs
Model
[data source]
Drive /
Battery
(kWh)
Max
Power
Avg
Power
(20-80%)
Max
C-Rate
Avg
C-Rate
(20-80%)
Time
(20-80%)
2021 Tesla Model S Plaid
[MotorTrend]
AWD
100 kWh
250 kW130 kW2.51.327 min
2021 Tesla Model S Long Range AWD*
[MotorTrend]
AWD
100 kWh
250 kW130 kW2.51.327 min
2021 Tesla Model 3 LR AWD (V3 SC)
[Tom Moloughney]
AWD
80 kWh
250 kW106 kW3.11.326 min
2019 Tesla Model 3 LR AWD (V3 SC)
[Tom Moloughney]
AWD
75 kWh
250 kW113 kW3.31.524 min
2021 Hyundai Ioniq 5 (72.6 kWh)
[Battery Life]
AWD
77 kWh
224 kW170 kW2.92.215 min
Comparison of range replenishing speed
The new Model S replenishes range very quickly. The peak rate is not as high as in the case of the more efficient Model 3, but it's very quick.

We applied the same charging results to the Model S Long Range AWD, which has a noticeably higher EPA range and a higher range replenishing rate.

-dcfc-range-replenishing-speed-comparison-20210622.png

Actually, the average in the 20-80% SOC window is better in the Tesla Model S Long Range AWD than in the Model 3 that we analyzed before. Because the tests are affected by many factors, we would say that it's comparable.

Of course, the Hyundai Ioniq 5 is offering the best rate of all EVs tested so far:

DC Fast Charging Comparison by InsideEVs
Model
[data source]
Drive /
Battery
(kWh)
Avg
Power
(20-80%)
WLTP range
rep. rate
(20-80%)
EPA Hgw range
rep. rate
(20-80%)
2021 Tesla Model S Plaid
[MotorTrend]
AWD
100 kWh
130 kW 12.3 km/min
(7.6 mi/min)
2021 Tesla Model S Long Range AWD*
[MotorTrend]
AWD
100 kWh
130 kW 14 km/min
(8.7 mi/min)
2021 Tesla Model 3 LR AWD (V3 SC)
[Tom Moloughney]
AWD
80 kWh
106 kW14.9 km/min
9.3 mi/min
13 km/min
(8.1 mi/min)
2019 Tesla Model 3 LR AWD (V3 SC)
[Tom Moloughney]
AWD
75 kWh
113 kW15.6 km/min
9.7 mi/min
13.4 km/min
(8.3 mi/min)
2021 Hyundai Ioniq 5 (72.6 kWh)
[Battery Life]
AWD
77 kWh
170 kW18.8 km/min
11.7 mi/min
Conclusions
It was the first fast-charging test of the all-new 2021 Tesla Model S Plaid that we analyzed so far and the results are not only very good, but also promising for the future.

The peak charging power is available for several minutes (10-30% SOC), the average of 130 kW is good, and the charging time, from 5-80% in 31 minutes, is impressive. The new Model S has potential to charge at even higher peak power levels in the future.

On the other hand, it seems that the upgraded battery system in Tesla's flagship will not be able to match Hyundai Motor Group's E-GMP platform. Long range and availability of the Supercharging network more than outweigh this difference, which makes the new Model S still the top choice for long-distance travel.

2021 Tesla Model S Plaid :: DC Fast Charging Summary by InsideEVs
Drive: AWD; Battery pack (net / total): 96.7 / 100 kWh
[Data source: MotorTrend]
Peak Power
Peak C-rate

Average Power (20-80% SOC)
Average-to-Peak Power
Average C-rate (20-80% SOC)

Time (20-80% SOC)
250 kW
2.5

130 kW
52%
1.3

27 min
Range Replenishing Speed (Average 20-80% SOC):
EPA Combined
EPA Highway
12.5 km/min (7.8 mi/min)
12.3 km/min (7.6 mi/min)

General info:

* Some values on the charts are estimated from the data source.

** Temperature of the battery cells might highly negatively affect charging capabilities. We don't have data about temperatures of the battery at the beginning and during the charging process. In cold or hot weather, as well as after driving very dynamically, charging power might be significantly lower than shown on the charts (in extreme cases charging might be impossible until the battery temperature will not return to an acceptable level).


Tesla Model S Plaid specs
  • 390 miles (628 km) of EPA est. range
  • battery capacity: N/A
  • 0-60 mph (96.5 km/h) in 1.99 seconds (*with rollout subtracted)
    0-100 km/h (62 mph) in 2.1 seconds (*with rollout subtracted)
    MotorTrend's 0-60 mph (asphalt, no rollout): 2.28 seconds
  • 1/4 mile 9.23 seconds at 155 mph trap speed
    Jay Leno's 1/4 mile record of 9.247 seconds at 152.16 mph trap speed
  • top speed of 200 mph (322 km) †when equipped with the proper wheels and tires (available fall 2021)
  • three-motor all-wheel drive (one motor in the front and two motors in the rear)
  • system output: 1,020 hp (about 760 kW)
  • DC fast charging: at up to 250 kW (Superchargers)
    can replenish 187 miles (301 km) in 15 minutes
  • Drag Coefficient 0.208 Cd
  • Wheels 19" or 21"
  • Cargo 28 cu ft
  • Weight 4,766 lbs (2,162 kg)
Tesla Model S Long Range specs
  • 405 miles (652 km) of EPA est. range
  • battery capacity: N/A
  • 0-60 mph (96.5 km/h) in 3.1 seconds
  • top speed of 155 mph (249 km)
  • dual motor, all-wheel drive (one motor in the front and one in the rear)
  • system output: 670 hp (about 499 kW)
  • DC fast charging: at up to 250 kW (Superchargers)
    can replenish 187 miles (301 km) in 15 minutes
  • Drag Coefficient 0.208 Cd
  • Wheels 19" or 21"
  • Cargo 28 cu ft
  • Weight 4,561 lbs (2,069 kg)

SOURCE: INSIDEEVs
Advertisement

 

ajdelange

Well-known member
First Name
A. J.
Joined
Dec 8, 2019
Messages
2,953
Reaction score
3,145
Location
Virginia/Quebec
Vehicles
Tesla X LR+, Lexus SUV, Toyota SR5, Toyota Landcruiser
Occupation
EE (Retired)
Country flag
Thanks for posting that. After all is said and done the Plaid exhibits an early charging rate (to 30%) of 2.5C, a 20 - 80% rate of 1.26C and a high end rate of 0.43C. As we saw in another post on charge data for Teslas these numbers are similar to those for an X LR+ and a 3 LR if slightly better. The X showed 1.11C and the 3LR 1.17C in the 20 - 80% SoC range. The rule of thumb I originally proposed was .01 hr (.6 minute) charging per percent SoC added in the 20 - 80% range because that is so easy to use. It looks, as more data comes in, that the actual number is smaller. 1.25C is 0.008 hr (.48 min) per %. We want the ROT to be very easy to use so, for the moment, we propose 0.5 min per %. Thus if you want to add 40% to your battery in the nominal operating range it would take 20 minutes (as opposed to 24 under the original proposed ROT). So I suppose we might modify the ROT to say "It take from 0.5 to 0.6 minutes to charge a Tesla per percent of charge taken on" with the caveats that it will take a little less time if you terminate at low SoC and a little more if you terminate at a high one. The nice thing about this is that the ROT doesn't say which model Tesla nor which version of the SC (though the Urban SC at 70 kW is out). Another caveat is, of course, that it is early days in terms of the number of Tesla vehicles examined. It appears that Tesla's charging philosophy is to maintain an average charge rate of about 1C with a certain amount of taper. A new battery, such as the ones used in the CT might allow for more aggressive charging by which we mean average rate higher than 1C realized by less taper.

All this is based on the curve these authors derived from a single charge. They, wisely, caveat the data because of this and mention some of the things that change rates so that the ROT needs refinement by looking at a number of charges. While looking at a couple of charge histories suggested that the X rate in 1.11C looking at an ensemble of charges suggest that the actual average rate is 1C after all.

Anyway, nice to have more data confirming the hypothesis.

The article says, based on the usual kW vs SoC charging profile for the Plaid
If we look at the charging curve, we can see that the new Model S appears to be much more capable than the Model 3 Long Range.
It is a common misconception that a charging curve that breaks later gives "much" better charging performance. It is not that which is important but rather the SoC vs time curve (which can be derived from the kW vs SoC curve). When we looked at the Plaid SoC vs time curve above we found that it is only slightly better than the Model 3 LR curve.[/QUOTE]
 
Last edited:

JBee

Well-known member
First Name
JB
Joined
Nov 22, 2019
Messages
434
Reaction score
436
Location
6000
Vehicles
Cybertruck
Country flag
And the question there is where is the Plaids extra performance coming from seeing it's still using 18650 cells and the M3 2170? I'd dare say mostly from the Plaids enhanced thermal management system. (and not the slightly modified cell chemistry).

Great article, thanks for sharing. I particularly like the " Ultimate DC fast charging card ". From that you can clearly see that it doesn't always charge at 250kW. So if we had a CT DM or TM I'd expect the 250kW be the rate more often, meaning a CT can charge at an even faster mph than a plaid from a 250kW SC.

Do we have enough data to extrapolate a "Ultimate DC fast charging card" for a DM adn TM CT?

1624531295769.png
 
Last edited:

ajdelange

Well-known member
First Name
A. J.
Joined
Dec 8, 2019
Messages
2,953
Reaction score
3,145
Location
Virginia/Quebec
Vehicles
Tesla X LR+, Lexus SUV, Toyota SR5, Toyota Landcruiser
Occupation
EE (Retired)
Country flag
And the question there is where is the Plaids extra performance coming from ...
The thing is that there actually isn't any extra performance. Overall the Plaid exhibits average charging at 1.53C which is, to two decimal places, the same as the long range 3. Even my ancient (2 yrs) X does 1.34C.
 

JBee

Well-known member
First Name
JB
Joined
Nov 22, 2019
Messages
434
Reaction score
436
Location
6000
Vehicles
Cybertruck
Country flag
The thing is that there actually isn't any extra performance. Overall the Plaid exhibits average charging at 1.53C which is, to two decimal places, the same as the long range 3. Even my ancient (2 yrs) X does 1.34C.
So that all depends on how long your measuring stick is though? ;-)

That might be true for a 95% SOC but not for between 10-30% SOC? The argument being that frequent low SOC charging equates to shorter overall long trip driving times, if they are beyond the range of a single "tank".
 

ajdelange

Well-known member
First Name
A. J.
Joined
Dec 8, 2019
Messages
2,953
Reaction score
3,145
Location
Virginia/Quebec
Vehicles
Tesla X LR+, Lexus SUV, Toyota SR5, Toyota Landcruiser
Occupation
EE (Retired)
Country flag
Do we have enough data to extrapolate a "Ultimate DC fast charging card" for a DM adn TM CT?
We are already doing what one author I remember calling "bold extrapolation" based on the assumption that the slope of the charging curve at a particular SoC is the same from charge to charge irrespective of SoC when you arrive at the station. I for one know this not to be the case as I have seen the SC kick up to full bore output at SoC's at which the widely published charging curve for my car is in taper. That's why we are really on thin ice with any of these tables or graphs.

But it's fun to speculate so here goes. It's probable that the CT will behave more or less like the recent 3 and Plaid in that it will support overall average rates of 1.5C if the charger can supply that. A 250 kW charger can do that for a vehicle with a 100 kWh battery as the average power required is 150 kW. So the "charging card" for the AWD CT is based on 4 minutes per percent. If you need to charge 40% its going to take about 16 minutes if you do it starting above 30%. Starting at 10 or 20% it''s going to take less than 16 minutes. Starting above 30% longer.

Now for the TriMotor assuming it to have a 200 kWh battery a V3 charger can't possibly charge it at an average rate of 1.5C because that would require 300 kW from it and it is limited to 250 kW. The peak rate it can do is 250/200 = 1.25C. If we assume that the new batteries have to taper to 0 at 100% SoC and further assume that the charger can go full out until the taper starts and that the taper is linear from when it starts to 100% then we can calculate that it would start at 60%. If we assume such a taper then we can have 1.25C charging (0.48 min per %) as long as we stay below 60%. But if we go up to 80% the average rate drops to 1.11C (0.54 min/%) so it looks as if 0.5 min/% is the RoT for the TM at a V3 which is probably optimistic as more aggressive taper is probably going to be required. But then again with a new battery and new architecture perhaps not. I'd say count on 25 minutes for a half charge in the TM and about 20 min in the AWD.
 

JBee

Well-known member
First Name
JB
Joined
Nov 22, 2019
Messages
434
Reaction score
436
Location
6000
Vehicles
Cybertruck
Country flag
@ajdelange
I actually put together that table and have included some modifiers so we can tweak range, C rate, battery pack size etc to get within the ballpark of a CT. I'm looking to plot some graphs and share it. Just need to add some calcs and polish up the formatting but will post it tomorrow. We can also throw in some SC limits etc to see how we fare. Should be fun. :)
 

ajdelange

Well-known member
First Name
A. J.
Joined
Dec 8, 2019
Messages
2,953
Reaction score
3,145
Location
Virginia/Quebec
Vehicles
Tesla X LR+, Lexus SUV, Toyota SR5, Toyota Landcruiser
Occupation
EE (Retired)
Country flag
So that all depends on how long your measuring stick is though? ;-)

That might be true for a 95% SOC but not for between 10-30% SOC? The argument being that frequent low SOC charging equates to shorter overall long trip driving times, if they are beyond the range of a single "tank".
No, they are very close to being the same for small, large and intermediate charges.
 

ajdelange

Well-known member
First Name
A. J.
Joined
Dec 8, 2019
Messages
2,953
Reaction score
3,145
Location
Virginia/Quebec
Vehicles
Tesla X LR+, Lexus SUV, Toyota SR5, Toyota Landcruiser
Occupation
EE (Retired)
Country flag
No, they are very close to being the same for small, large and intermediate charges.
Easy to say but to show that I have prepared a graph which illustrates it:

Logrates.jpg

This graph is the same as the ones I have posted earlier except that I have put every charge I calculated (5,041) for both the 3 LR (red dots) and the Plaid (blue dots). I have also plotted the linear fit to the Plaid which has the same slope as the linear fit to the 3 to 3 significant figures. That alone says that on average the Plaid's charging performance is not better than the 3's. Note that this is a log plot so the linear fit does not appear as a straight line.

As mentioned when I first presented this plot type in another thread, the vertical extent of a column indicates the range of charging times to take on a particular % change in SoC. Thus the Plaid can take on a 30% charge in as little as 8 minutes (0.27 min/%) but it may take as much as 17.6 minutes (0.59 min/%) depending on whether you start at 10% or 60% SoC. The corresponding rates for the charges are, respectively, 2.25C and 1.03C. The linear fit line appears to cut the column just about in the middle and this is a log plot that implies that the best fit line represents the geometric mean. The geometric mean of 2.25 and 1.03 is 1.52 and the slope of the fit line is 1.53 (. 39 min/%). As this is a log plot the vertical extent of the columns of dots represent the ratios of maximum to minimum charge times. What these data show is that while on overage the two cars charge almost identically the ratio of rates is higher in the Plaid being 2.19 relative to the 3 where it is 1.84.

Now the ROT for these two cars is 0.39 minute per percent. The chart shows that for very small charges (around 1%) the maximum rate can be 4 times the minimum rate. As the ROT curve splits this range we deduce that charge rates and thus charge times can be as much as double or as little as one half what the ROT predicts. For more reasonable charges (take on 30% or more) the extremes differ by a factor of 2 and so the range of expected charging times could be expected to be as much as 141% (sqrt(2)) of what the ROT predicts or as little as 70.7% (1/sqrt(2)) of what the ROT predicts. The picture clearly shows that as we go to higher charge increments the vertical extent of the colums diminished so that, for example, at 50% the extremes of charging times would be with about ±20% of what the ROT predicts.

I think it is appropriate to mention at this point that we (or I) are mining a lot of conclusions from two curves the provenance of one (the 3) is unknown. But what we have learned should be, at least, representative of what we might expect to see in the real world.
 

JBee

Well-known member
First Name
JB
Joined
Nov 22, 2019
Messages
434
Reaction score
436
Location
6000
Vehicles
Cybertruck
Country flag
I made up a table " Cybertruck Ultimate DC fast charging card" based on the C rates from the plaid Ultimate DC fast charging card from Insideev above.

Looks like this for a 200kW pack TM CT:

CT TM Ultimate Charge Card.png


I can share the spreadsheet if anyones interested. Making some graphs up too.
Looks like we need a 500kW SC to keep up with CT TM, or as previously just 2 charging port would do it. :p
 

ajdelange

Well-known member
First Name
A. J.
Joined
Dec 8, 2019
Messages
2,953
Reaction score
3,145
Location
Virginia/Quebec
Vehicles
Tesla X LR+, Lexus SUV, Toyota SR5, Toyota Landcruiser
Occupation
EE (Retired)
Country flag
For quite a while we are going to have to live with the V2 chargers (maximum rate 0.75C; 0.8 min/%) and V3 chargers (maximum rate 1.35 C; 0.48 min/%). Since these rates are modest I think, as I said in an earlier post, that taper onset will come later than it does now. Thus I think charges to less than 60% SoC will probably take place for the most part at either 0.8 or 0.48 %/min. It's going to take a while (about 40 min) to replace half the charge in a TM CT from a V2 charger.

Above 60% (or whatever the actual number is) I expect there will be taper but I don't think overall rates from a V3 will drop below C.

I think it is time again to emphasize that we can't conclude too much from a curve or 2 from a charge or 2. The car is designed to take no more than a certain amount from a charger but if the charger doesn't want to offer that because it is hot or it thinks the wand/socket is hot is will not allow as much as the car wants. This happened to me the other day. Thus every charge profile is different and it is unreasonable to consider any "charging card" or curve derived from a small sample as anything more than representative. What we need is data from several charges.

To illustrate, analysis if the curves from my two last charges suggest that the rate for the X is 1.11C. But overall results from my last 11 charges suggest that I am more likely to see 1C.
 

JBee

Well-known member
First Name
JB
Joined
Nov 22, 2019
Messages
434
Reaction score
436
Location
6000
Vehicles
Cybertruck
Country flag
The dynamics of real world aren't lost on me, but I do find it compelling to both understand and learn to predict system behaviour.

In our current EV unfriendly climate in Oz driving an EV outside of metro areas is a challenge. But even more of a challenge will be the provisioning of adequte network capacity in small isolated rural RE grids that prevail 85% of our state, and about 65% of our country. The first step, as always, is to model consumer demand. That means understanding the base and peak loads of EV charging. That is the other half of my interest in EV charging rates, in particular future demand for EV chargers. Hence my previous reference to 2 SC chargers could power our whole town.

What I'd like to see is V2G, V2H and in particular V2V but with embedded renewables. Imagine a "distributed EV charging car park" where EVs share and manage load and renewable power sources to avoid the network collapsing. For example: just 10 households with a 25kW V2VGH setup and connected EV could power a SC. Or 25 with 10kW etc. Then add embedded and bulk solar, and incentives for allowing your EV to be moderately cycled for cash or free charging. All of a sudden a low population rural EV town can afford a SC, instead of needing a megapack. Most cars are either parked at work or home most of the day and night. Just needs some scheduling.
 

ajdelange

Well-known member
First Name
A. J.
Joined
Dec 8, 2019
Messages
2,953
Reaction score
3,145
Location
Virginia/Quebec
Vehicles
Tesla X LR+, Lexus SUV, Toyota SR5, Toyota Landcruiser
Occupation
EE (Retired)
Country flag
The dynamics of real world aren't lost on me, but I do find it compelling to both understand and learn to predict system behaviour.
Understood

In our current EV unfriendly climate in Oz
[/QUOTE]Victoria?
 

JBee

Well-known member
First Name
JB
Joined
Nov 22, 2019
Messages
434
Reaction score
436
Location
6000
Vehicles
Cybertruck
Country flag
Understood

In our current EV unfriendly climate in Oz
Victoria?
[/QUOTE]

Do you mean because of the EV kilometre tax? Thats because it is and has always been a communist police state run by a bunch of socialists that think debt is wealth, and society owes government for their good fortune. Their budget is in shambles and they think that taxing the wealthy, the only ones that can afford EVs here in Oz atm, will promote sustainability. The energy minister famously promoted that we should all walk instead of driving, and offered free parking for EVs instead. And no I'm not kidding.

Reality is that outside of metro areas you can't survive without cars here in Australia. Yet they remain adamant that they are the creator and provider of rights and opportunities but not the protector of ours. As such most people have had enough and there's a mass exodus of people leaving metros for a country change to where life can resemble normality. Our leaky, flyscreen windows in a submarine approach to hotel quarantine doesn't help either. They now think they can fix it with a $200m 500bed dedicated facility. (That's $400k a bed - price of a good house here and just 500!) people don't want to be locked up, or locked down. We've just had it too good for too long and everyone has become complacent of not holding the government accountable. People are waking up to the roses now, that someone else has planted in their garden. Same everywhere I suppose.

You know I wouldn't be opposed to a km tax provided they were capable of making roads that you don't need a 4x4 to use. Let alone any of the drivable ones are tolled and jammed. That's why a pet side project of mine since 2014 has been developing evtol platforms. No roads required.

Since moving country we've cut our local kms down to virtually nothing, its just the bulk shopping trips that put kms on, 1100-1300km each time. Which we also combine with catching up with friends and family, shopping, buiness, going out and hairdresser. Which makes the CT even more appealing. Comfort, space, self driving (or at lest assist), storage all in a funky EV I can charge at home and at destination from free solar.
 
Last edited:
Advertisement

 
Advertisement
Top