Handy Artie

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A king size mattress is 76” x 78”. A queen size mattress is 60” x 78”. Neither of these will fit flat into a Sprinter because of the rear wheel wells. Which one will fit into the CT bed? A Sprinter is now the basis for most Class C RV’s.
 

braddibbnd

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Ford E-150 Generator. NOT!!!!
There is really nothing on your list I'd care for. Now a pair of swivel captain's chairs for the front seat especially when they release FSD would be #1 on my list. Maybe a HUD since I'm not a big fan of only having screen off to the side.
 

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Great list! Great talking points! Hope Elon is listening. Regarding the roof rack, which I've commented on before, as having as a factory option, by providing female, threaded cups built-in to facilitate vertical, male threaded supports that would enable a factory designed system that is easily removable. Also, on the horizontal members, provide clips and power points that would enable the owner to install solar panels. Regarding the tow hitch, I'd move this requirement way up on your list as a factory, built-in option with wiring for cameras on the rear of the trailer.
 

Kamin

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I agree that my most important item is the pass through. All the features I want were listed in the video and the most important are climate control for the bed and an integrated way to trailer more batteries. It is such a no brainer that having an electric vehicle with the towing capacity of the tri-motor option be able to easily integrate more batteries in a trailer. The bed of the trailer could be a copy of the base of the cybertruck providing both more range and a trailer with its own power supply built in. The additional solar infrastructure could also be part of the trailers construction.
 

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I agree that my most important item is the pass through.
For all y'all who are interested in the passthrough, here's one vehicle (the Chevy Avalanche) which implemented it successfully:
The Chevy Avalanche has been mentioned many times on this forum, but I haven't seen a lot of detailed descriptions on how the folding midgate works. So, here's one such description.

The Chevy Avalanche is built on the GMT800/GMT900 platform, so it's basically a Silverado/Tahoe/Sierra/Yukon/Escalade with an alternative body.

This vehicle exists, and some people really love them. But this particular GMT800/GMT900 variant is relatively rare. It didn't exactly tear up the sales charts. I can enumerate the reasons why I didn't buy one (I chose a GMT900-based GMC Sierra Hybrid), but analyzing those tradeoffs is a bit beyond the scope of this comment. Many Cybertruck enthusiasts seem to be new to the world of pickup trucks, so I just want to make sure everyone is familiar with the prior art on the folding midgate.
 
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Luke42

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The midgate seems such a no-brainer once you've eliminated the separate cab-box.
Indeed!

But that raises the question of why the Avalanche remained a niche vehicle, when compared to the Silverado/Sierra and the Tahoe/Yukon/Escalade -- since it appears to combine the advantages of an SUV and a pickup truck.

My guesses are as follows:

Towing Capacity: Avalanche's sales must have been limited by it's CUV-like towing capacity of 5000lbs. Since other GMT800/GMT900 vehicles can tow a lot more, I suspect this was a marketing decision on GMs part to defend their per-unit margins.

Pricing: I can't speak to the pricing, since I wasn't paying attention to these kind of vehicles when they were new (the MPG was not compatible with my lifestyle at the time). It's possible that GM priced these vehicles so as to avoid selling too many of them. That seems like something GM would do.

Looks: The unconventional looks (with the "sails" on the side) likely turned off some of the traditionally-minded truck buyers who would have been the only ones interested in it at the time (due to the MPG).

Owners: Lastly, the owners of these vehicles got a bit of a rep. One of my former bosses (a guy who I did not admire) drove a Chevy Avalanche, and I really wouldn't want to be seen driving the same thing he drove. I concede that this is completely irrational -- but, given the Avalanche owners I've met over the years since, this could be a widely held view.

A lot of these vehicles remain on the road. For a certain kind of owner, the Avalanche is the best truck ever made -- and they haven't given them up easily. They're like the Astro Van crowd that way.

Conclusion:
Some of these guesses could apply to the Cybertruck (unconventional looks, targeted buyers), some of them do not apply (MPG, towing capacity, pricing), and some of them are TBD (owner reputation). The Avalanche is one of the vehicles in recent automotive history which is most similar to the Cybertruck in terms of features, though, so its history is worthy of study.

Personally, I considered an Avalanche briefly when was shopping for my GMC Sierra Hybrid. I chose the hybrid system over the midgate.
 
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Crissa

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It think the other thing is that so far, all the midgate vehicles do something well but make compromises that don't make them popular. Like the Ridgeline, which has a great highway mileage but CUV towing and poor offroad capability. I heard the Avalanche had body sealing problems. And the small bed was unusually small.

But there are markets for flat-land trucks or light trucks. The Cybertruck will do lots of things well for its price-point.

-Crissa
 

Tim.Luchenko

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You have listed nice features, and all of them and even more are preferable to have from tesla home. But I have a question for you: Are you willing to pay for all that you've listed? Or you expect to have it for $39 900? Sometimes people are over expected from Cybertruck. Who else offers all these features, Ford? Rivian? GM? ... Therefore share price dropped down after battery day. Noone actually heard about the new technology tesla is having on the road, everyone was expecting to hear 1 mln mile battery and V2G. If tesla puts everything you've listed in the Cybertruck it would cost no less than $180,000.
And now think again, do you really wanna have it for this money? I do not need anything of this, just keep the price as low as it can be. If I need something - I will make it work for me.
 

Crissa

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If tesla puts everything you've listed in the Cybertruck it would cost no less than $180,000.
A) Which of these options would quadruple the list price?
B) They're options, not standards.

I expect the solar option to add a thousand or so dollars. The top rack about $500. The V2H is already in there, and the Leaf does it, for gosh sakes. Fold-flat seats probably cost another $2k. The dynamic charging is more gates, but the gates are already in the car? Winch and plow mounting points shouldn't involve a huge amount of work, as they are already looking at tow and hitch points.

The midgate is the only thing we really want standard, so it's built right, but it's just another door.

There is an engineering cost to involving these, but some we know they're already testing - the software and add-on market, for instance - and this is more about saying we do want our computer on wheels to adapt with us. Making sure they know the demand is there.

-Crissa
 

Sirfun

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For all y'all who are interested in the passthrough, here's one vehicle (the Chevy Avalanche) which implemented it successfully:
The Chevy Avalanche has been mentioned many times on this forum, but I haven't seen a lot of detailed descriptions on how the folding midgate works. So, here's one such description.

The Chevy Avalanche is built on the GMT800/GMT900 platform, so it's basically a Silverado/Tahoe/Sierra/Yukon/Escalade with an alternative body.

This vehicle exists, and some people really love them. But this particular GMT800/GMT900 variant is relatively rare. It didn't exactly tear up the sales parts. I can enumerate the reasons why I didn't buy one (I chose a GMT900-based GMC Sierra Hybrid), but analyzing those tradeoffs is a bit beyond the scope of this comment. Many Cybertruck enthusiasts seem to be new to the world of pickup trucks, so I just want to make sure everyone is familiar with the prior art on the folding midgate.
Thanks for linking that video. It was interesing also how everything was manually operated, but it seems like this crowd wants everything push button.
Also it was very interesting to see all the comments from people who own and swear by their Avalanche.
I personally think the lack of sales had to do with macho attitudes that they weren't a Real truck. And I would imagine that most of the people that think the Cybertruck is ugly, would feel the same about the Avalanche. They're fairly similar in looks.
 

firsttruck

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Can not use Rivian tank turn on hard surfaces or softer surfaces you do not want too tear up. Tank turn really can only be used on slick or slippery surfaces and is no use for towing.
4 wheel steering is much better. Some military vehicles have it. GM Quadrasteer seems to have been pretty reliable.

More on Quadrasteer & towing

** skip to 06:35 for Quadrasteer Demo
I Got a Quadrasteer! + Short Demonstration
Random Chimp
May 29, 2020


Will Quadrasteer have a second life for Extreme Towing and Handling
By MrTruckTV
Sep 7, 2019
 

Julien

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A king size mattress is 76” x 78”. A queen size mattress is 60” x 78”. Neither of these will fit flat into a Sprinter because of the rear wheel wells. Which one will fit into the CT bed? A Sprinter is now the basis for most Class C RV’s.
I don't believe that either mattress would fit in the bed unless if there is that full passthrough because the bed is only 6 feet long and every mattress is longer than six feet long. Being 6' 1", I couldn't even lay down in the CT, much less fit a mattress in there.
 

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