Total Solar Eclipse in Austin Texas, Apr 8, 2024 at 1:37 pm

Delusional

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SE2024Apr08T.GIF



A few links.
https://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/solar.html
https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/solar/2024-april-8
More maps here. Also be sure to check out the Annular Eclipse of October 14, 2023, which passes 100 or so miles south of Austin.
https://www.greatamericaneclipse.com/october-14-2023

It will be a good date to be in Austin. The total eclipse passes right through Austin and Austin is very near the point where it lasts the longest time. Totality will last over four minutes in Austin, which is very long, it is rarely over three minutes. If you miss this one, the next chance in North America is 2044, and again in 2045, unless you go to northern Alaska in 2033.

I figure my reservation number is about 224,000. If CT production starts in late 2022, they should be getting to my number somewhere near the date in question. If I get lucky, I might just opt to pick the CT up in Austin, even if they will deliver it to my home.
That way I can see the eclipse in an area with less probability of clouds. I have attempted to see total solar eclipses twice in my life, but it was obscured by clouds both times. The one in 2017 was exceptionally disappointing because there were only two clouds in the sky and one of them moved to exactly where I didn't want it to go. I saw the eclipse before totality and after totality, but not the best part.
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Sirfun

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A few links.
https://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/solar.html
https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/solar/2024-april-8
More maps here. Also be sure to check out the Annular Eclipse of October 14, 2023, which passes 100 or so miles south of Austin.
https://www.greatamericaneclipse.com/october-14-2023

It will be a good date to be in Austin. The total eclipse passes right through Austin and Austin is very near the point where it lasts the longest time. Totality will last over four minutes in Austin, which is very long, it is rarely over three minutes. If you miss this one, the next chance in North America is 2044, and again in 2045, unless you go to northern Alaska in 2033.

I figure my reservation number is about 224,000. If CT production starts in late 2022, they should be getting to my number somewhere near the date in question. If I get lucky, I might just opt to pick the CT up in Austin, even if they will deliver it to my home.
That way I can see the eclipse in an area with less probability of clouds. I have attempted to see total solar eclipses twice in my life, but it was obscured by clouds both times. The one in 2017 was exceptionally disappointing because there were only two clouds in the sky and one of them moved to exactly where I didn't want it to go. I saw the eclipse before totality and after totality, but not the best part.
Wow, that's crazy that you didn't get to see the sun's corona. I saw my first and only eclipse in eastern Oregon in 2017. It was spectacular. I'm already making plans for 2024. Check out this link. It will tell you the exact times and duration of totality of anywhere you click on the map. The edge of the shadow of totality will actually be between Downtown Austin and Giga Texas. So even though downtown is in the shadow of totality, the eclipse will only last about 1min. 44sec. Here's the link to the tool.

http://xjubier.free.fr/en/site_page....html?Lat=30.26656&Lng=-97.74326&Zoom=15&LC=1
 
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CyberT

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SE2024Apr08T.GIF



A few links.
https://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/solar.html
https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/solar/2024-april-8
More maps here. Also be sure to check out the Annular Eclipse of October 14, 2023, which passes 100 or so miles south of Austin.
https://www.greatamericaneclipse.com/october-14-2023

It will be a good date to be in Austin. The total eclipse passes right through Austin and Austin is very near the point where it lasts the longest time. Totality will last over four minutes in Austin, which is very long, it is rarely over three minutes. If you miss this one, the next chance in North America is 2044, and again in 2045, unless you go to northern Alaska in 2033.

I figure my reservation number is about 224,000. If CT production starts in late 2022, they should be getting to my number somewhere near the date in question. If I get lucky, I might just opt to pick the CT up in Austin, even if they will deliver it to my home.
That way I can see the eclipse in an area with less probability of clouds. I have attempted to see total solar eclipses twice in my life, but it was obscured by clouds both times. The one in 2017 was exceptionally disappointing because there were only two clouds in the sky and one of them moved to exactly where I didn't want it to go. I saw the eclipse before totality and after totality, but not the best part.
I love the excitement and enthusiasm that you shared in this post. Time to start doing the math for me too!
 
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Delusional

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That xJubeir website is run by a man with a passion. When it gets close to an eclipse in a big country, it becomes one of the most visited sites on the internet. He serves many large images and when it gets really hot, he has to pay thousands of euros per month for his web hosting service. If you go there more than a few times, please drop a fiver in his donation box at the top of the page. It is a very valuable service he provides.

His cloud maps are pertinent. The idea is to wait until just a few days before the eclipse, before booking your trip. You won't be able to get a room inside the path of totality, but you will be able to get close enough. Study the weather maps and choose your location based on possible cloud cover. Have at least a dozen possible viewing locations inside the path of totality scouted out.
The morning of the Eclipse, study the weather more, and decide which way along the path of totality you wish to travel, based on cloud cover and wind direction. Use satellite photos, not radar. In this way you can maximize your chances of avoiding the clouds.

This is what I did in 2017. I started in Asheville NC, which is a road nexus, and gave me the option of going northeast or west to find the lowest cloud cover. It really worked well. Twenty minutes before totality, I arrived at a highway rest stop and had very low cloud cover. It was just extremely bad luck that the wind blew the few clouds in the sky right in front of the sun with a minute to go. There were approximately two thousand people at the rest stop, you can imagine the sigh of disappointment. The wind kept blowing, and we did see about 15 seconds of totality, right at the end. But it just wasn't the full sol.

I am extremely motivated to see the next one.
 
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Sirfun

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I recently reserved a house in Arkansas. And my wife tells me that ALL the houses we were looking at a couple of months ago are reserved. So I thought I'd revive this thread and give everyone a heads-up. Start making plans, or it's going to get more difficult soon!
 

Sirfun

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This video was uploaded by a person driving around in Columbus, South Carolina during the Solar Eclipse in 2017.
PLEASE, take notice of the beginning and end of this video. That is what it will be like if you are outside of the shadow of totality. It will be interesting, but you will only be able to look at the sun and see all but a small percentage blocked by the moon, with solar glasses or a welding helmet.

But all the twilight (darkness), seeing planets during daytime and sight of a black disk up in that twilight sky with the corona of the sun stretching out around it. Will not happen. You will have missed what all the hoopla is about.

When this person points the camera at the sun, it does a HORRIBLE job of showing what it looks like. It is almost impossible for cameras to capture what it looks like.

 
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Frank Mendez

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My son and I were able to see the last one. Drove to Wyoming. Very worth the effort to see. I will be trekking to see this one too.
 

Sirfun

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My son and I were able to see the last one. Drove to Wyoming. Very worth the effort to see. I will be trekking to see this one too.
I've read that one of the thoughts most people have after a total eclipse is, When's the next one!

It's hard to believe how quickly time has passed by since Aug. 2017. My family drove from So. Cal. to eastern Oregon and made our way to a destination I never thought I'd get to see, Joseph, Oregon. This eclipse we are going to Arkansas. My mom lives a few miles outside of the zone of totality. Here's a photo I've got from on top of Ritter Butte. I've picked out another mountain top for this eclipse, but I'm trying to keep the location quiet (we'll see how that works out). :ROFLMAO:

elipsetall.jpg
 

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I've read that one of the thoughts most people have after a total eclipse is, When's the next one!

It's hard to believe how quickly time has passed by since Aug. 2017. My family drove from So. Cal. to eastern Oregon and made our way to a destination I never thought I'd get to see, Joseph, Oregon. This eclipse we are going to Arkansas. My mom lives a few miles outside of the zone of totality. Here's a photo I've got from on top of Ritter Butte. I've picked out another mountain top for this eclipse, but I'm trying to keep the location quiet (we'll see how that works out). :ROFLMAO:

elipsetall.jpg
That's not an eclipse! The sun was blotted out by the 5G waves
 
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This video was uploaded by a person driving around in Columbus, South Carolina during the Solar Eclipse in 2017.
PLEASE, take notice of the beginning and end of this video. That is what it will be like if you are outside of the shadow of totality. It will be interesting, but you will only be able to look at the sun and see all but a small percentage blocked by the moon, with solar glasses or a welding helmet.

But all the twilight (darkness), seeing planets during daytime and sight of a black disk up in that twilight sky with the corona of the sun stretching out around it. Will not happen. You will have missed what all the hoopla is about.

When this person points the camera at the sun, it does a HORRIBLE job of showing what it looks like. It is almost impossible for cameras to capture what it looks like.

I don’t know who is dumber. The guy who won’t get out of his car for 10 minutes to enjoy “the most beuatiful thing in his life”, or the idiot who parked his car in the middle of the road to enjoy it.


Total eclipse is insane. Very much worth going out of your way to see.
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