Travel Trailer will charge my Cybertruck

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I have ordered a 2022 Living Vehicle travel trailer than can charge my Cybertruck. I can even do level 2 charging from it. My question is towing capability. On Tesla's Cybertruck page it says towing for Tri-Motor version will be OVER 14,000 pounds. So it should tow 15,000 pounds or more for towing right? I mean everyone keeps saying up to 14,000 pounds but that's not what Tesla is advertising. 14,000+ means more than that. So my guess is max towing will be between 15,000 and 20,000 pounds. What are your thoughts?

I will be towards the max towing rate with my travel trailer's configuration. My travel trailer will be able to charge my Cybertruck at a rate of 16KWh so I figure I can sometimes bypass Superchargers if I can park somewhere for 3-4 hours and get some decent charge without having to unhook my travel trailer. Also, I want to be able to boondock and be in the middle of nowhere and charge my vehicle to 100% if I am out there for a week or more. I want to be the rare person that tows frequently with my Cybertruck. My family are going to full time it for a year in our Travel Trailer and want to be all electric doing it. I really don't want to buy a diesel truck.
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Firetruck41

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More than 14,000 could mean 14,001 lbs. Other than that, we don't know. I don't know the trailer you are purchasing, but you need to make sure that the actual tongue/pin weight plus all occupants and cargo in the Cybertruck are less than the payload capacity (which we don't really know yet either). A family of five could easily take up 800+ lbs of your payload capacity. Add some firewood, the hitch system and a few bikes and you are well over 1000lbs before you attach the trailer.

Personally, if I were buying a trailer that would be close to towng capacity or maxing out payload, I wouldn't purchase until I had confirmed my trucks capacities.
 
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More than 14,000 could mean 14,001 lbs. Other than that, we don't know. I don't know the trailer you are purchasing, but you need to make sure that the actual tongue/pin weight plus all occupants and cargo in the Cybertruck are less than the payload capacity (which we don't really know yet either). A family of five could easily take up 800+ lbs of your payload capacity. Add some firewood, the hitch system and a few bikes and you are well over 1000lbs before you attach the trailer.

Personally, if I were buying a trailer that would be close to towng capacity or maxing out payload, I wouldn't purchase until I had confirmed my trucks capacities.
I've never seen any company ICE or electric that didn't do it by 1,000 pound increments for towing capacity. So its possible but not probable. The Cybertruck has 3,500 payload so tongue weight + occupants + stuff won't exceed that amount. I am getting the travel trailer. That's set in stone. The question will be if I can use the Cybertruck to tow it or not.
 

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I have ordered a 2022 Living Vehicle travel trailer than can charge my Cybertruck. I can even do level 2 charging from it. My question is towing capability. On Tesla's Cybertruck page it says towing for Tri-Motor version will be OVER 14,000 pounds. So it should tow 15,000 pounds or more for towing right? I mean everyone keeps saying up to 14,000 pounds but that's not what Tesla is advertising. 14,000+ means more than that. So my guess is max towing will be between 15,000 and 20,000 pounds. What are your thoughts?

I will be towards the max towing rate with my travel trailer's configuration. My travel trailer will be able to charge my Cybertruck at a rate of 16KWh so I figure I can sometimes bypass Superchargers if I can park somewhere for 3-4 hours and get some decent charge without having to unhook my travel trailer. Also, I want to be able to boondock and be in the middle of nowhere and charge my vehicle to 100% if I am out there for a week or more. I want to be the rare person that tows frequently with my Cybertruck. My family are going to full time it for a year in our Travel Trailer and want to be all electric doing it. I really don't want to buy a diesel truck.
Question. Why do you need to unhook to supercharge? All the new superchargers are pull-through stalls?
 
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Question. Why do you need to unhook to supercharge? All the new superchargers are pull-through stalls?
New ones built now do. However, existing ones do not and that is the majority right now. Even with pull through I am not sure all locations can accommodate a 30Ft travel trailer not blocking the way for others. i will use them but based on traveling over 150k miles in Tesla's I know the majority do not work without unhitching. Also, most spots have 1 pull through at least for the ones built pre 2021. So if its taken you are out of luck. I am okay unhitching and doing that but love the freedom of being able to charge my vehicle anywhere. It's like having my garage wall charger on the go!
 
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I have ordered a 2022 Living Vehicle travel trailer than can charge my Cybertruck. I can even do level 2 charging from it. My question is towing capability.
You should be asking lots of questions about charging your CT too. If you go with the maximum solar package (as I understand it) you will get 2640W of solar. That's not a whole lot in terms of what you need to charge a CT. If you stop in the middle of the day in a sunny spot in the summer and put out the solar awnings you will be charging your CT at a rate of 5.9 miles per hour. If you are in a nice sunny place in the desert of the southwest, for example, you will get about 7 hours of charging at this rate i.e. about 42 miles. Now it's time to introduce the towing aspect. As this thing exceeds the maximum spec for the CT it is clear that the penalty for towing it is going to be greater than the nominal 50% often used as a starting point for these calculations. Those 42 miles are probably more realistically 12 - 17 miles. That's all you can get out of Sol with a 2640W system and that leaves nothing over for the appliances (refrigerator) or lights or anything else.

I have only done a top level calculation here but it is clear that you really need to understand the reality of how little solar energy one can collect from the sun relative to what is needed to charge a BEV let alone one that is towing 15,000 lbs.

On Tesla's Cybertruck page it says towing for Tri-Motor version will be OVER 14,000 pounds. So it should tow 15,000 pounds or more for towing right? I mean everyone keeps saying up to 14,000 pounds but that's not what Tesla is advertising. 14,000+ means more than that. So my guess is max towing will be between 15,000 and 20,000 pounds. What are your thoughts?

My travel trailer will be able to charge my Cybertruck at a rate of 16KWh so I figure I can sometimes bypass Superchargers if I can park somewhere for 3-4 hours and get some decent charge without having to unhook my travel trailer.
Please do the research you need to do to disabuse yourself of this sort of notion. Note, for starters, that kWh is not a rate. It is an amount of energy. If the trailer battery system has an inverter capable of 16 kW power production it can deliver 16 kWh of energy to your CT in 1 hr and 23 minutes provided the trailer batteries have 16 kWh in them. To collect that much power from a 2640 W solar system will take 16000/2640 = 6.06 hrs full sun equivalent if you are in a place where you can get 6.06 hours of full sun equivalent. Note that collecting 6 hrs FSE requires more than 6 hrs because of the movement of the sun around the sky. Even in the best places in the US it will probably take you from sunrise to sunset to collect that much. And remember, in towing range that's only about 14 miles.


Also, I want to be able to boondock and be in the middle of nowhere and charge my vehicle to 100% if I am out there for a week or more.
The 16 kWh, a day's worth of collection, is about 10% of the battery capacity of the TriMotor CT.


I want to be the rare person that tows frequently with my Cybertruck. My family are going to full time it for a year in our Travel Trailer and want to be all electric doing it. I really don't want to buy a diesel truck.
It looks, at first blush, that your expectations are hugely inflated with 2640 W of solar under the best of circumstances (South West desert). Now I understand that these things are equipped with generators that can be used to charge the CT but then you might as well buy an ICE truck and use the fossil fuel more efficiently.
 

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I've never seen any company ICE or electric that didn't do it by 1,000 pound increments for towing capacity. So its possible but not probable. The Cybertruck has 3,500 payload so tongue weight + occupants + stuff won't exceed that amount. I am getting the travel trailer. That's set in stone. The question will be if I can use the Cybertruck to tow it or not.
Payload is "up to 3500 pounds". With ICE, a trucks payload capacity can vary widely based on options, accessories, it may be the same with the Cybertruck. Just something to consider.
 
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You should be asking lots of questions about charging your CT too. If you go with the maximum solar package (as I understand it) you will get 2640W of solar. That's not a whole lot in terms of what you need to charge a CT. If you stop in the middle of the day in a sunny spot in the summer and put out the solar awnings you will be charging your CT at a rate of 5.9 miles per hour. If you are in a nice sunny place in the desert of the southwest, for example, you will get about 7 hours of charging at this rate i.e. about 42 miles. Now it's time to introduce the towing aspect. As this thing exceeds the maximum spec for the CT it is clear that the penalty for towing it is going to be greater than the nominal 50% often used as a starting point for these calculations. Those 42 miles are probably more realistically 12 - 17 miles. That's all you can get out of Sol with a 2640W system and that leaves nothing over for the appliances (refrigerator) or lights or anything else.

I have only done a top level calculation here but it is clear that you really need to understand the reality of how little solar energy one can collect from the sun relative to what is needed to charge a BEV let alone one that is towing 15,000 lbs.

On Tesla's Cybertruck page it says towing for Tri-Motor version will be OVER 14,000 pounds. So it should tow 15,000 pounds or more for towing right? I mean everyone keeps saying up to 14,000 pounds but that's not what Tesla is advertising. 14,000+ means more than that. So my guess is max towing will be between 15,000 and 20,000 pounds. What are your thoughts?

Please do the research you need to do to disabuse yourself of this sort of notion. Note, for starters, that kWh is not a rate. It is an amount of energy. If the trailer battery system has an inverter capable of 16 kW power production it can deliver 16 kWh of energy to your CT in 1 hr and 23 minutes provided the trailer batteries have 16 kWh in them. To collect that much power from a 2640 W solar system will take 16000/2640 = 6.06 hrs full sun equivalent if you are in a place where you can get 6.06 hours of full sun equivalent. Note that collecting 6 hrs FSE requires more than 6 hrs because of the movement of the sun around the sky. Even in the best places in the US it will probably take you from sunrise to sunset to collect that much. And remember, in towing range that's only about 14 miles.


The 16 kWh, a day's worth of collection, is about 10% of the battery capacity of the TriMotor CT.


It looks, at first blush, that your expectations are hugely inflated with 2640 W of solar under the best of circumstances (South West desert). Now I understand that these things are equipped with generators that can be used to charge the CT but then you might as well buy an ICE truck and use the fossil fuel more efficiently.
You are looking at only solar. There's a 50KWh battery on the travel trailer so there is plenty of energy to transfer to the Cybertruck. Also, you can equip the travel trailer with a propane generator that can constantly recharge the battery too. There is 80pounds of propane on board the travel trailer. So the 16kW charge is a level 2 charger. Of course, even with a full battery in the travel trailer it would be used up in a few hours but that's when the backup generator would kick in. I think I have all my bases covered for this. I have owned 4 electric vehicles. I don't see any deficiencies for charging from the travel trailer. Also, this won't be my primary charging. I will mainly be charging at RV sites and Superchargers.
 
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Payload is "up to 3500 pounds". With ICE, a trucks payload capacity can vary widely based on options, accessories, it may be the same with the Cybertruck. Just something to consider.
Yep! I noticed there is a lot of difference on ICE vehicles. Mainly i think it has something to do with gas vs diesel & 2 wheel vs 4 wheel drive. I will keep an eye on that:)
 

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You are looking at only solar.
Yes. That's what I thought you wanted to do.

There's a 50KWh battery on the travel trailer so there is plenty of energy to transfer to the Cybertruck.
Not really. That's probably going to turn out to be a quarter of a tankful worth 150 miles without the trailer and probaly 60 with it.

What charges this battery?


Also, you can equip the travel trailer with a propane generator that can constantly recharge the battery too.
So you are going to burn fossil fuel to produce electricity which you are going to use to charge a battery and then use this battery to charge another battery and then run the CT with that? As I said in my last post that's going to be lots less efficient than pulling with a diesel.

Also, this won't be my primary charging. I will mainly be charging at RV sites and Superchargers.
I got the impression that this is what you were trying to avoid. If this is your main source and all you hope to be able to do is pick up a handful of miles from the sun on days you aren't rolling then yes, that's doable.
 
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The 50 Amp hookup at the RV site will recharge my travel trailer most times. Once that is charged up I will use the 50 Amp hookup to charge the Cybertruck. All i want is an extra 50 miles towing. I only plan on towing about 200 miles a day most travel days. Solar and the propane generator will charge the batteries when boondocking or in rare circumstance when its more convenient than supercharging.
 

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More than 14,000 could mean 14,001 lbs. Other than that, we don't know. I don't know the trailer you are purchasing, but you need to make sure that the actual tongue/pin weight plus all occupants and cargo in the Cybertruck are less than the payload capacity (which we don't really know yet either). A family of five could easily take up 800+ lbs of your payload capacity. Add some firewood, the hitch system and a few bikes and you are well over 1000lbs before you attach the trailer.

Personally, if I were buying a trailer that would be close to towng capacity or maxing out payload, I wouldn't purchase until I had confirmed my trucks capacities.
I would also not want to go over about 80% of any of the weight limits. You want to have a comfortable buffer for both safety and insurance reasons. And we always pack more than we plan to.
 

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Question. Why do you need to unhook to supercharge? All the new superchargers are pull-through stalls?
where are there pull thru superchargers that will accommodate a 30' trailer?
 

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Check the Plugshare photos of the Strassburg, VA Supercharger station. These are not "pull through" but you can obviously "pull in" and charge leaving your trailer out to block traffic. Several stations (Vienna, VA; Joyce Kilmer) have on or two terminals set up for pull in at one or the other or both ends of a row of back in's. You can charge at those again leaving your trailer out to potentially block traffic. True pull through I don't think I have ever seen.
 
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