Turning radius.

cyberbear

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Does anyone have a guess at the turning radius of the new cyber truck. With such a large vehicle I’m hoping it’ll have a smaller turning radius .With the air suspension it would be interesting ,any comments? It seemed to be OK at the reveal.
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madquadbiker

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Does anyone have a guess at the turning radius of the new cyber truck. With such a large vehicle I’m hoping it’ll have a smaller turning radius .With the air suspension it would be interesting ,any comments? It seemed to be OK at the reveal.
Hopefully they will engineer it to have a tight turning circle, something to beat all the other pickups would be amazing. All I can compare it to is the Smart car, the difference between my 2016 fortwo and my previous older model fortwo is like night an day, this one can almost turn around in it’s own length, well 6.95m, and seeing how the two models are the same length with the latest being wider they have done some clever engineering to put it off.
 

Daweism

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Based on my experience with driving my 2 door Raptor, which is has a wheelbase that is 12 inches shorter than the 4 door Raptor. The wheelbase is the distance in between the front and the rear set of tires. The shorter wheelbase helps greatly when trying to achieve a tighter turning radius. A shorter wheelbase makes the world of difference on tight U-turns vs having to do a 3 point turn. Inexperienced drivers also tend to rub the rear tires on tighter corner turns in longer wheelbase vehicles.

With that said the wheelbases of the following trucks are:

Raptor (2 Door) 134 inches
Raptor (4 Door) 146 inches
Cybertruck 150 inches

So for the Cybertruck to have a good turning radius, the front tires will need a more obtuse turning threshold than existing pick up trucks.
 

Luke42

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If the turning radius is similar to the trucks they should be benchmarking (Silverado quad cab short bed), it'll work for me.

I have one of these trucks (tarted up as a GMC Sierra), and the turning radius is fine. Not as good as our old Mazda5 or our old Prius, but it's a non-issue everywhere I've driven in the truck (so far).

If Tesla follows (or slightly exceeds) the industry norms, they'll be fine.
 
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CyberMoose

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I wonder if the back wheels only activate at a certain point when rotating the steering wheel. My concern would be if i'm turning my steering wheel completely to the left to get out of a parallel parking spot...will my back wheels just hit the curb.
 

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I'm refering to the Mercedes, not my Cybertank
 

Auric

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They have cameras everywhere, probably they new when there is a curb or wall next to the car?
 

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Watching the video of them unload the CT for the Petersen Auto Mueseum made me a little nervous about turning radius. I’m hoping the turning radius will be better in the production vehicle.


Video of the Cybertruck being unloaded for the Petersen Auto Museum.

 

Crissa

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I think the matter of getting off the trailer and the pedestrians were the bigger part of the prototype's turning radius there.

-Crissa
 

Luke42

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Watching the video of them unload the CT for the Petersen Auto Mueseum made me a little nervous about turning radius. I’m hoping the turning radius will be better in the production vehicle.
It definitely out-turns a Silverado/Sierra/F-150.

It would have had to do a tank-turn to get off the trailer and go straight in.

Remember, this thing is just a pickup truck. It's a technologically advanced and interesting pickup truck, but also just a pickup truck.
 

alan auerbach

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In mechanical engineering courses, a standard example of "the law of diminishing returns" is vehicle front-steering angles (applies less to rear-steerers like forklifts or tailwheel aircraft).

You can design front wheels that angle a full 90 degrees (and it's common on planes with left and right engines, where one-sided power can turn the aircraft in its own length). But with a road vehicle, a 90-degree angle would be useless. So how about a full-turn angle for the CT of, say, 80 degrees?

Apart from the huge extra cost for wheel clearance and notably the steering components (especially with front-wheel drive), it could be self-destructive. Imagine parking with the wheels fully turned. The driver comes back later, the space in front is now empty, the driver guns it to go forward, and the truck leaps to the side (unless the rims rip out of the tires).

So even if extreme wheel-crimp could be offered, it might not be a good idea. Nor is it as much needed now; the focus on turning-circles dates from before power steering when it would save your arms if you could do a U-turn in one go. I'll trust the CT engineers to design an optimal compromise.

("Skid-" or "tank-steer" vehicles turn fine with treads, and with castoring fronts (as in a zero-turn mower) because their turning wheelbase is effectively zero. With conventional wheeled vehicles, skid-steering will work only insofar as the wheelbase is short.)
 
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Daweism

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It definitely out-turns a Silverado/Sierra/F-150.

It would have had to do a tank-turn to get off the trailer and go straight in.

Remember, this thing is just a pickup truck. It's a technologically advanced and interesting pickup truck, but also just a pickup truck.
As seen with the Rivian, a tank turn will most likely be a possible with the Cybertruck.
 

CyberMoose

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The Rivian R1T is a quad-motor. The cybertruck is only single, dual, and tri motor. for the tank turn to work, the left wheels and the right wheels need to spin in opposite directions. The front wheels on the Cybertruck most likely won't be able to accomplish this without some engineering that would have no benefit other than the ability to do a tank turn. I don't think Tesla will do anything to try to give us the ability to Tank turn. If they wanted to, they would probably just release a quad motor but we don't know if that would be beneficial enough to make a quad motor over a tri motor.
 
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