Unless a new class of buyer joins, there will not be many takers at $85k+ for a pickup

CompMaster

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With F150 or other companies. If/When looking at stats, make sure you are looking at regular sales and not fleet or corp...
 

Ogre

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I just want to point out that a lot of high net worth individuals got that way because they don’t spend $85k on things like cars or trucks.

Net worth is a truly horrible indicator of people’s desire or even capability to buy a supertruck.

I’m certainly not pulling $85k out of my IRA or taking a loan out on my home in order to buy a truck. I seriously doubt many people will. People who do that don’t have high net worths.
 

LoneWolfO6

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People will stretch their budgets for a Tesla, but they can only stretch so far.
Some can always look for other options at 2/3 the price. Wrangler has been around for over 50 years and survived two wars. But not to sure about 21 mile battery concept? Sells for $55k to $67k.

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Alpine

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Some can always look for other options at 2/3 the price. Wrangler has been around for over 50 years and survived two wars. But not to sure about 21 mile battery concept? Sells for $55k to $67k.

ACBF2210-B277-4DDE-AD56-5FF26604C7D1.jpeg
That is the worst hybrid on the market with regards to fuel consumption bar none.

You get 21 miles of pure electric with a full charge if you baby it. Then in normal hybrid mode it gets a retardedly low 20mpg combined city/hwy!

In hybrid mode, it gets worse mileage than a regular crewcab f150. The regular non hybrid v8 rubicon gets 14mpg so i guess compared to that its something.

Charge it every night and keep to short drives is only way to have some semblance of good mpg.
 


Sirfun

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That is the worst hybrid on the market with regards to fuel consumption bar none.

You get 21 miles of pure electric with a full charge if you baby it. Then in normal hybrid mode it gets a retardedly low 20mpg combined city/hwy!

In hybrid mode, it gets worse mileage than a regular crewcab f150. The regular non hybrid v8 rubicon gets 14mpg so i guess compared to that its something.

Charge it every night and keep to short drives is only way to have some semblance of good mpg.
Wow, you're right that's horrible. My Pacifica PHEV does WAY better than that. It seems like the RAV4 PHEV would be a much better choice in that segment of vehicles.
 
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LoneWolfO6

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That is the worst hybrid on the market with regards to fuel consumption bar none.

You get 21 miles of pure electric with a full charge if you baby it. Then in normal hybrid mode it gets a retardedly low 20mpg combined city/hwy!

In hybrid mode, it gets worse mileage than a regular crewcab f150. The regular non hybrid v8 rubicon gets 14mpg so i guess compared to that its something.

Charge it every night and keep to short drives is only way to have some semblance of good mpg.
But it’s a 4x4 hybrid? LOL!
 

FutureBoy

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I just want to point out that a lot of high net worth individuals got that way because they don’t spend $85k on things like cars or trucks.
That seems like a judgement you are making. I agree that there are some people who have money and are known by those around them to be very tight with it.

But that is not everyone. More often, I see people who are very principled in what they spend their money on. They don’t spend on anything unless it has a specific purpose or will bring about a desired outcome. Given the exact right conditions, there is almost no limit to what they will direct toward their end goal. For these folks, money isn’t for simple accumulation. It is a tool to achieve some desired outcome.

Thing is though, they have their own goals and motivations. If you don’t know each person well enough you won’t know what they might spend their money on.

Also, there are multiple ways to be in control of an object beyond just purchasing it with cash. If the desired outcome involves getting control of a specific object, there are often ways to take control with minimal financial cost.

I’m certainly not pulling $85k out of my IRA or taking a loan out on my home in order to buy a truck. I seriously doubt many people will. People who do that don’t have high net worths.
Agreed.
 

HaulingAss

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That seems like a judgement you are making. I agree that there are some people who have money and are known by those around them to be very tight with it.

But that is not everyone. More often, I see people who are very principled in what they spend their money on. They don’t spend on anything unless it has a specific purpose or will bring about a desired outcome. Given the exact right conditions, there is almost no limit to what they will direct toward their end goal. For these folks, money isn’t for simple accumulation. It is a tool to achieve some desired outcome.

Thing is though, they have their own goals and motivations. If you don’t know each person well enough you won’t know what they might spend their money on.
Exactly! I didn't buy a car until I had been a motorcyclist for 4 or 5 years. And I bought used motorcycles with cash. And my first few cars were all used and all bought with cash to save the finance charge. I basically lived like a college student so I could get financially ahead and I did that for many years after I could have afforded things like new TV's furniture, expensive vacations in nice hotels, etc. I just kept investing my money with the hope I wouldn't need to worry about money some day.

With some good investments that I resisted selling simply because they had doubled, tripled or quadrupled, that day came a lot sooner than I expected. Because my best investments kept going up. And up. And up. Sure, sometimes they would go down for a year or two but mostly they went up. I only sold a stock if I needed the money to invest in a company that looked more promising or to buy a house or some land or pay taxes. By the time I was 37 I was retired and could afford anything I wanted. Because I had religiously saved money and avoided spending it.

Now I have more money than I can shake a stick at and it simply doesn't matter to me. I have reached my goals and as long as I don't go crazy with luxury chalets, jets and yachts, I will never have to worry about money again and can buy whatever I want without having to strategize, pinch pennies or trying to get a bargain deal. The money just keeps multiplying. and I spend very little time managing it, mostly I just stay abreast of things happening in the world to make sure my investments are still on track for continued performance in coming years The secret is to spend less than you make. I would not be in this position if I took loans out to buy things.

I know a number of people who resisted taking loans when they were younger and are now in their 50's-70's who are in a similar position. Most of them did it by having a good paying job or running a profitable business and putting their savings into good stocks and letting the gains ride. Spend less than you make while young and invest the rest in good companies with a future. Not every investment will play out but don't sell your winners and don't sell your losers simply because they went down, sell losers if you determine they probably don't have a good future.

The number of people across the developed nations of the world who can afford a tough environmentally friendly Cybertruck with all the bells and whistles including FSD are more numerous than many can imagine. They have millions of dollars worth of stocks and no debt. Many of them don't look any different from those in debt up to their eyeballs wondering how they are going to meet next months obligations. But they are a lot happier for not having to worry about it. Don't spend more than you make!

Cybertruck will not be outrageously expensive like so many are claiming. Initial versions will average well under $90K (even optioned up) and as those reservations get filled and Tesla continues to ramp production, they will release the lower cost variations that will be able to go head to head with no-nonsense gas and diesel trucks in terms of offering consumers the most bang for their buck. The automotive world will be in shock and awe. We will simply nod our heads and say "we knew it was coming, it's been more than obvious ever since the reveal was so successful. Ignore the mainstream media who tried to portray the reveal as a giant fail.
 
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Alpine

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One thing iv observed dealing with millionaires is that the adage that the rich didn't get that way by blowing money is true. They are very careful and calculated with their expenditures. Some even nickle and dime you to death.

What i have also noticed is they are not tight in all departments of their life. They will splurge in one area and be tight in another.

I know 2 company owners who drive older modest sedans but live in 4-5 million $ houses. I think they actually enjoy and are more at ease not driving fancy cars.

There are very few warren buffets who spend the minimum on themselves.
 
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Crissa

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Your ability to save money is a privilege.

I spent most of my 20s couch surfing and making less money than rent or my medical bills would cost. I chose busses when I was poor, but that limited where I could live, what jobs I could take. No amount of saving would get me a house, credit, or retirement.

My spouse bought our first new car with a loan because she suddenly needed to commute the two hours (50 mile) to Stanford. (She had been laid off after 9/11 in the telco crash and unemployed for three months.) That no-frills base manual Sentra cost us (with credit) as much in 2002 as our new 2013 Mazda with every single option available. That first down payment was the recycling check we got from my five-years-disabled Tercel.

We didn't get full health insurance until late 2005.

And in 2010, we bought a distressed property - damaged entryway, had been foreclosed upon and bought cash but the new owner suffered a medical emergency and couldn't climb the stairs. We lots bids on several other homes to cash buyers - and then only got this one with an FHA tiny deposit loan using the last of the money from my spouse's great grandmother's farm and selling my online virtual server.

Always by the skin of our teeth, always in debt. Far more of my friends are in worse shape; since Boomers each generation is on median, more poor at any specific age.

But yes, you do get to be rich because you saved. But you were able to save because you were lucky. ^-^

🤷‍♀️

-Crissa
 
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Alpine

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Your ability to save money is a privilege.

I spent most of my 20s couch surfing and making less money than rent or my medical bills would cost. I chose busses when I was poor, but that limited where I could live, what jobs I could take. No amount of saving would get me a house, credit, or retirement.

My spouse bought our first new car with a loan because she suddenly needed to commute the two hours (50 mile) to Stanford. (She had been laid off after 9/11 in the telco crash and unemployed for three months.) That no-frills base manual Sentra cost us (with credit) as much in 2002 as our new 2013 Mazda with every single option available. That first down payment was the recycling check we got from my five-years-disabled Tercel.

We didn't get full health insurance until late 2005.

And in 2010, we bought a distressed property - damaged entryway, had been foreclosed upon and bought cash but the new owner suffered a medical emergency and couldn't climb the stairs. We lots bids on several other homes to cash buyers - and then only got this one with an FHA tiny deposit loan using the last of the money from my spouse's great grandmother's farm and selling my online virtual server.

Always by the skin of our teeth, always in debt. Far more of my friends are in worse shape; since Boomers each generation is on median, more poor at any specific age.

But yes, you do get to be rich because you saved. But you were able to save because you were lucky. ^-^

🤷‍♀️

-Crissa
Now consider how lucky you are compared to those a few steps below. 😊
 

CyberGus

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But yes, you do get to be rich because you saved. But you were able to save because you were lucky. ^-^

🤷‍♀️

-Crissa
Let's use the word "fortunate" instead of "lucky", which implies that life is all chance. There's some self-determination in there, no?

I work hard, and I'm good at what I do, but I also accept my good fortune and privilege.
 

Crissa

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Let's use the word "fortunate" instead of "lucky", which implies that life is all chance. There's some self-determination in there, no?

I work hard, and I'm good at what I do, but I also accept my good fortune and privilege.
Sure. Everyone's got a slightly different connotations in their vocabulary.

-Crissa
 

CyberGus

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Sure. Everyone's got a slightly different connotations in their vocabulary.

-Crissa
I work in Customer Support, where connotations are the difference between a positive NPS score, or being called to answer to my management.

Wordsmithing is my occupational hazard lol

 

 
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