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Starting to plan new construction of a house and want to design it all electric. Slab on grade radiant heat, grid tied with rack solar pv and water heater mounted on south facing slope. planning on some battery storage, grid power goes down in the area from time to time. Pricing out battery, looks like the truck I plan on having in the garage would be cheaper than the equivalent in batteries and that could be used to power the house in a blackout with V2G. My conclusion is V2G capability is a must have. I am not an electrician and don’t have experience yet with the type of system I am thinking about, would appreciate any help from the more technical members of the community,I really have a hard time picturing anything other than the cybertruck in the garage but if it does not have v2g then I might have to learn more about what ford is offering. Seems a waste to not have 200kw as backup power.
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Was reading another thread and it looks like I am thinking about vehicle to home v2h, not vehicle to grid v2g. Ooops
 

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Starting to plan new construction of a house and want to design it all electric. Slab on grade radiant heat, grid tied with rack solar pv and water heater mounted on south facing slope. planning on some battery storage, grid power goes down in the area from time to time. Pricing out battery, looks like the truck I plan on having in the garage would be cheaper than the equivalent in batteries and that could be used to power the house in a blackout with V2G. My conclusion is V2G capability is a must have. I am not an electrician and don’t have experience yet with the type of system I am thinking about, would appreciate any help from the more technical members of the community,I really have a hard time picturing anything other than the cybertruck in the garage but if it does not have v2g then I might have to learn more about what ford is offering. Seems a waste to not have 200kw as backup power.
You can buy a thingy that mounts behind your electric meter that allows you to plug in a 240V cord from a generator or a CT. I think the 240V outlet on the CT will provide enough power to run my house (not the AC though). If you can shut off some of your big loads on a rolling basis you can be comfortable for short outages. A heat pump water heater and maybe a pellet stove or ground source heater will help keep the load under 6 or 7 KW. I am getting ready to build a new home and will make provision for a window a/c in the master bedroom. I will also have the wiring ready to plug in my CT
 

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You can get a pretty reasonable stationary battery backup for about 7k. When they wire up your solar, you can have them make electrical provisions for a battery backup and hook this up to it. Honestly, the only cells i want for home stationary backup are LFP. Cycle life and full charge / discharge capabilities along with safety advantages are too great to ignore.

https://bigbattery.com/products/48v-kong-elite-plus-lifepo4-332ah-17-0kwh/
 
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Thanks for the feedback guys. Oh 220 out of ct would work in an emergency huh, disconnect from grid and plug it into critical house circuit. F the lightning🤣
 

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The cheapest solution for a bare minimum is to plug an extension cord into the Cybertruck and run it into the kitchen with a power strip. Unplug refrigerator and plug it in along with other critical devices (cell phone, a couple lights, maybe microwave oven).

If you have frequent outages, could be worth the expense to automate this, as others have described.
 

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Starting to plan new construction of a house and want to design it all electric. Slab on grade radiant heat, grid tied with rack solar pv and water heater mounted on south facing slope. planning on some battery storage, grid power goes down in the area from time to time. Pricing out battery, looks like the truck I plan on having in the garage would be cheaper than the equivalent in batteries and that could be used to power the house in a blackout with V2G. My conclusion is V2G capability is a must have. I am not an electrician and don’t have experience yet with the type of system I am thinking about, would appreciate any help from the more technical members of the community,I really have a hard time picturing anything other than the cybertruck in the garage but if it does not have v2g then I might have to learn more about what ford is offering. Seems a waste to not have 200kw as backup power.
have a full basement if you want better efficiency
 

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Was reading another thread and it looks like I am thinking about vehicle to home v2h, not vehicle to grid v2g. Ooops
V2g is a standard and includes v2h as a subcategory in a way. It is simpler to power a home than to pipe the power back into the grid. So you can say either. The CT could power appliances since it has outlets but that would be like an extension cord and only to a couple of appliances. To send power to the whole house you would need a transfer switch and a cutoff to the grid. If the grid is out that isn't a problem but when it comes bsck you need so ething smart enough to transfer the power appropriately. It has nothing to do with the car as it is only a power source; whoever is 'doing' v2g/v2h will have to supply the additional hardware and softeare. This says nothing of the wear and tear on your car batteries. You are better off with a set of power walls (or equivalent) as they are designed to power houses and to switch the grid in and out.
 

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Simpler, but not all grid-tie systems include the authorization to power the home in isolation. I was about to say that the V2G implies V2H, but alas, many original installations did not because inspectors were weirdly pedantic that the generation must shut down instead of cutting itself from the grid when the grid fails.

-Crissa
 

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Starting to plan new construction of a house and want to design it all electric. Slab on grade radiant heat, grid tied with rack solar pv and water heater mounted on south facing slope. planning on some battery storage, grid power goes down in the area from time to time. Pricing out battery, looks like the truck I plan on having in the garage would be cheaper than the equivalent in batteries and that could be used to power the house in a blackout with V2G. My conclusion is V2G capability is a must have. I am not an electrician and don’t have experience yet with the type of system I am thinking about, would appreciate any help from the more technical members of the community,I really have a hard time picturing anything other than the cybertruck in the garage but if it does not have v2g then I might have to learn more about what ford is offering. Seems a waste to not have 200kw as backup power.
Takeaway from Texas grid fiasco is plan on disruption at the worst possible circumstances. All electric home in South Salem NY was a HUGE detrimental reliance in winter that cost $2000+/ mo USD to heat and cook. F#$& the lighting can’t help you.

Texans can inform you further. Like @Crissa, saving perishables freezer and fridge are#1, water pressure#2 and minisplit heat#3. In CAN putting goods outside is an option that leaves frozen water lines and heat to survive a cold blast.

SO very doable with CT.
 

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Simpler, but not all grid-tie systems include the authorization to power the home in isolation. I was about to say that the V2G implies V2H, but alas, many original installations did not because inspectors were weirdly pedantic that the generation must shut down instead of cutting itself from the grid when the grid fails.

-Crissa
My solar cannot power my house when the grid goes down, as you say. I think it is partly that back then (2006) I didn'thave the space or will to install large marine batteries and have an expensive transfer switch. Nowadays one can have a solar array and power wall setup where the power wall can run the house when the grid goes out. In fact, my generator, installed after the first year of PSPSes, also powers the house when the grid fails (but my solar still kicks out). Powering the house is not the problem, but deciding how and when to turn which power source on and off. If you have a manual switch it is probably easier but I wouldn't do it.
 

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So when the grid power goes down and you deplete the battery in the truck so now you have a dead battery and no way to charge it. hmmmmm

How about a wood stove in the house for a dependable heat source and a propane generator, fixed or a portable Generac 17.5Kw separated from the grid via a transfer switch (I use a manual switch) with a propane conversion kit on it and a propane tank in-ground and out of site then you can heat and cool the house and charge the CT. I have a heat pump water heater in the garage and it only draws 3 amps on heat pump mode which is all we use.

I live on the Gulf Coast and hurricanes have taught me to be totally self-sufficient when the winds blow. Our last storm left us without grid power for over a week and I was running a diesel generator at the time and have since switched over to a propane rig. Love it.

Also consider building with ICF exterior walls (Insulated Concrete Form) like living in a beer cooler. My son says I can heat it with a match and cool it with an ice cube.

Please visit www.energywisestructures.com for accurate design guidance and proper sizing of your HVAC system, they guarantee your HVAC power consumption.
 
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