What will it typically cost to recharge a dual motor at a Tesla charging station?

Donno77

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What will it typically cost to recharge a dual motor at a Tesla charging station?

 

ajdelange

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That will depend on what the station charges per kWh and how many kWh you take on which, in turn, depends on the route you are driving. Go to A Better Route Planner, put in the model(s) you favor and some trips you think you will make. ABRP will plan the trip in order to minimize charging time and show you the estimated cost for each station it wants you to stop at.

The reason it gets tricky is because some states allow charging by kWh and some states only by time. Also you may get to a destination quicker by taking on two small charges at two separate stations that you will by taking on the full required charge at one.
 

Saskateam

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I have been wondering about the time it takes to charge at 1 rapid charger vs 2 shorter stops. I have been learning about charging curves and how to optimize your charge to get the most miles for the least time. It will be interesting to see what the charge curve is for the CT on version 2 and 3 chargers.
 

ajdelange

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Optimum charging profile depends on battery chemistry and how well the temperature of the battery is controlled. Will the CT use the same chemistry as the current Tesla cars? Someone knows but I certainly don't.

As current is pumped into a battery it produces ions which flow from cathode to anode but before it gets to where it produces the ions it must flow though resistance where it produces heat so a battery warms as it charges (or discharges). Also as ions move to the anode the anode swells putting mechanical stress on the battery components. As the battery approaches high charge there is higher liklihood that an ion will react irreversibly with the electrolyte and be removed forever from the anode/cathode shuttle. As a consequence of all this charge is slowed as the battery approaches full. If you arrive at a super charger with a battery 10% full it will charge rapidly (over 100 kW depending on the charger) at first but as the SoC goes above 50 % the rate will slow and as the SoC gets to be over 90% it will have slowed dramatically to 10's of kW. Thus if you need to take on 80 kWh during a trip in a car with a 100 kWh battery you will do it a lot faster if you discharge down to 10% and charge to 60 or 70 a couple of times than if you charge to 90% at one. It may take as long to acquire the last 10% of charge as it did to get the first 50%. Multiple charges, of course, means that you have to get off the road to get to the charging station multiple times and this is another place where the Tesla chargers have an advantage over the competition. The SCs seem to be located closer to main arteries than the competitions'. This is the sort of thing you'll discover if you play with ABRP.
 
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Skidmarks68

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I think he was just curious what the actual cost would be ballpark?
 


Cyber_Dav

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I think he was just curious what the actual cost would be ballpark?
I used 'A Better Route Planner to figure a ballpark. A 13% charge (11 minutes) shows as $7.41 (68 cents per minute). 13% is very close to 1/8, so 0 to 100% (at this rate) would be about $59.

abrp.JPG


Seems really high, but that is what I get. Anybody want to check my numbers?
 

ajdelange

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It isn't a question of checking your numbers. It is a question of where you charge and for how long. If I charge (X100D) from 14% to 54% at Robbinsville, N.J, ABRP says it will take about 17 minutes and the charge will be $4.57 for about $0.268/min. Noting that I have picked up 40% SoC that implies $11.42 to fully charge the battery (100 kWh) which means that this station sells electricity for about 11.5 cents per kW/h.

OTOH if I were to charge from 10% to 87% at Brattleboro, VT ABRP says that it would take 47 min and cost me $18.29 implying $0.425/min, $23.75for a full (100%) charge and, thus $0.238/kWh.

Now last time I actually did charge at Brattleboro is was 20% to 82%, took 43 minutes, consumed 61.1 kWh and cost me $18.29. That's $0.427/min and $0.299/kWh implying that a full charge would be $29.50.

A charge at Baie St. Paul from 47% to 89% consumed 41.33 kWh in 40 minutes and cost USD $14.37. Thus this station sells electricity at effectively $0.347/kWh or $0.359/min so that a full charge would be $34.21

All these numbers are appreciably less than what ABRP shows for you but electricity in California is expensive!

Your approach using ABRP is the only way to answer your question until you actually operate a BEV.

Note that in some states electricity cannot be sold by the kWh (must be sold by the minute) and in other cases it cannot be sold by the minute (must be sold by the kWh). California has just passed legistation requiring kWh. You can look on PlugShare and see how a particular station determines you bill.
 
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Donno77

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It isn't a question of checking your numbers. It is a question of where you charge and for how long. If I charge (X100D) from 14% to 54% at Robbinsville, N.J, ABRP says it will take about 17 minutes and the charge will be $4.57 for about $0.268/min. Noting that I have picked up 40% SoC that implies $11.42 to fully charge the battery (100 kWh) which means that this station sells electricity for about 11.5 cents per kW/h.

OTOH if I were to charge from 10% to 87% at Brattleboro, VT ABRP says that it would take 47 min and cost me $18.29 implying $0.425/min, $23.75for a full (100%) charge and, thus $0.238/kWh.

Now last time I actually did charge at Brattleboro is was 20% to 82%, took 43 minutes, consumed 61.1 kWh and cost me $18.29. That's $0.427/min and $0.299/kWh implying that a full charge would be $29.50.

A charge at Baie St. Paul from 47% to 89% consumed 41.33 kWh in 40 minutes and cost USD $14.37. Thus this station sells electricity at effectively $0.347/kWh or $0.359/min so that a full charge would be $34.21

All these numbers are appreciably less than what ABRP shows for you but electricity in California is expensive!

Your approach using ABRP is the only way to answer your question until you actually operate a BEV.

Note that in some states electricity cannot be sold by the kWh (must be sold by the minute) and in other cases it cannot be sold by the minute (must be sold by the kWh). California has just passed legistation requiring kWh. You can look on PlugShare and see how a particular determines you bill.
---------------------------
This discussion is helpful, thanks. In Florida, where we will be most of the time, the power cost is pretty reasonable so it appears going from 15% to 90% would cost less than $30.00. Regards, Donno
 

ajdelange

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Let me just reiterate that for those of you who do not own a BEV and are wondering what operating one involves ABRP can be your best friend. You can try different vehicles (Tesla, Rivian), different battery pack sizes, different weather conditions, different loads, different charging philosophies etc and learn an awful lot.
 

Skidmarks68

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I am new to electric vehicles so the expense involved with owning one is a big deal to me. I spend quite a bit on gas with my current truck and average 15mpg. @ 2.50 per gal. After reading the previous comments it sounds like the cost of charging is est. a little less than half the cost. I must say I was expecting much better savings from driving an EV
 


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I have never done a long distance road trip in an EV. I have been playing around with the A Better Route Planner application to get an idea of what it would take to do a long distance trip. I look forward to comparing the numbers provided with the application to real world numbers while actually driving the CT.
 

Cyber_Dav

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I am new to electric vehicles so the expense involved with owning one is a big deal to me. I spend quite a bit on gas with my current truck and average 15mpg. @ 2.50 per gal. After reading the previous comments it sounds like the cost of charging is est. a little less than half the cost. I must say I was expecting much better savings from driving an EV
Using travel chargers is supposed to be limited to traveling, and is very expensive compared to home charging. I anticipate needing them once or twice a year.

Charging at home is much less expensive.
 

K Doc Brown 007

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Using travel chargers is supposed to be limited to traveling, and is very expensive compared to home charging. I anticipate needing them once or twice a year.

Charging at home is much less expensive.

Everyone driving patterns will be different... but with tri motor 500 mile range I e Percy the most of my charging at home as well..... none charging at home I estimate to be 6-8 x per year at most
 

ajdelange

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Charging at home is much less expensive.
Lots who buy a BEV wind up spending endless hours on fora like this one and find that it leads them to other more broadly energy related ones and before they know what happened they wind up with solar panels on the roof. This is the cheapest way to charge, for sure.
 
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azjohn

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I am new to electric vehicles so the expense involved with owning one is a big deal to me. I spend quite a bit on gas with my current truck and average 15mpg. @ 2.50 per gal. After reading the previous comments it sounds like the cost of charging is est. a little less than half the cost. I must say I was expecting much better savings from driving an EV
I spend about $40 a month in electricity, my rate at night is $.06 a KW

 

 
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