Who Plans on Towing? And What is Their Plan?

Bob Anderson

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I was reading an older article on towing w/ a Model X and it got me thinking about the Supercharger experience w/ towing. The author stated he had to unhitch most of the time to SC, and since most SC (including new V3s being installed) are back-in vs pull-through, I was curious what readers on this site plans are. I haven't seen one, are there long cables to avoid taking up other stalls? Or is unhitching the only option on a long-haul RV trip?

https://www.greencarreports.com/new...-a-tesla-model-x-thank-elon-for-superchargers
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ldjessee

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Several Superchargers in Europe have pull through and we have seen designs for newer Supercharger locations that have pull through spots.

If the Cybertruck falls under the new Heavy Truck division, then I expect the Cybertruck can use the Semi charger, which I also expect to be installed at, or in similar locations to, truck stops along the highways. It is complete speculation on my part.
 

S1d3w1nd3r

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I would love to see CT specific SC’s at truck stops, card lock locations, and rest areas. Ability to use the mega charger infrastructure would be brilliant. That type of charging infrastructure thinking will start to win over truck owners.
 

AustroTom

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As for the op, we will get rid of our mh and buy a toyhauler to be towed by the CT.
Charging will hopefully be adapted to the upcoming Ct relaease and therefore towing capabilities.
It will also be up to Tesla owners etiquete to not occupy stalls that are specificly suited for pull through charging. Semi/CT chargers at truck stops would be a super plus.




Until a year ago, no Tesla was approved for towing.

So I don't think that experience will be the same as in the future.

-Crissa
I'm confused by that statement: Wasn't the X always a tow vehicle up to 5,000Lbs?
 

LoPro

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Several Superchargers in Europe have pull through and we have seen designs for newer Supercharger locations that have pull through spots.

If the Cybertruck falls under the new Heavy Truck division, then I expect the Cybertruck can use the Semi charger, which I also expect to be installed at, or in similar locations to, truck stops along the highways. It is complete speculation on my part.
Yep, all superchargers built since late 2018 which I have visited in Norway have been pull-through (except one because of the oblong lot). Several previously built ones as well. May have something to do with the popularity of small trailers and that few ordered a Model 3 (or X and Y) without a tow hitch here.

Pull-throughs are convenient when it’s not very busy and full even without a trailer. Especially when many stop for just a 10 min ~250kW burst charge.

A supercharger turned very busy when I charged with a trailer (getting firewood from my father-in-law) last year and I blocked a charger which wasn’t popular (stern looks and couple pointing and arguing with each other 😊) so felt like unplugging and take another lap into the stall to save a marriage for fellow Teslarati. In very busy instances it is important to have space around the stall area at a pull-through so a trailer can “stick out” and people still pass.

Concerning the location of the connector on the CT prototype I’m sure I can’t get close enough backing in on some of the back-in superchargers. On some older ones the cable is just long enough to reach the Model 3 connector when it’s parked an inch from the curb stone. Pull-throughs a are great for slightly different locations of the connector too.
 
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carpedatum

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Admittedly I see my CT towing big trailers (boat as big as the road allows, travel trailer with elbow room, that sort of thing). I might have a different perspective if a small cargo trailer would do.

Seems likely to me, then, that many circumstances will suggest decoupling a trailer to charge. It isn't exactly a picnic to pull a big trailer through many US gas stations, either - it gets relatively easy at some truck stops off the interstates, but it'd be a total non-starter at the corner gas station in many towns. So what I'd like to see is trailer hookup and dropoff trivialized.

That can be easier or harder today. The status quo might involve hand-cranking the tongue jack, and practically crawling under the truck to disconnect/reconnect the safety chains and wire connector, wrestling with stuff that's gotten wet/dirty. Positioning the ball to reconnect things, most times today, is best done with two people and may have a big futz-factor. There are gadgets, such as electric tongue jacks, that help and some trucks have helpful features.

Hopefully I can tell the CT to do much of this stuff itself, and what remains to be done by hand can be made both hassle-free and safe. For instance, I would expect a CT to tell me if I'm trailering and don't have the trailer electrical hooked up properly, but I'd also expect it to make proper hookup trivial and almost unavoidable. I would expect it to stick its own ball directly under the socket on the trailer while I watch - keeping my finger on a button in the mobile app, much like Summon works. There's a lot of room for innovation here, some of it on the trailer side of the equation.

It could be less nerve-wracking to drop and reconnect the trailer than to guide it through many charging stations. What might make it so?
 

Firetruck41

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Having to disconnect, with weight distribution systems, would be a pain in the rear. And every connect/disconnect on a trip, increases the chance of something going wrong, such as a safety pin being left out, or similar.

I've never heard of someone disconnecting, to get fuel (though I'm sure there is the anecdotal story out there), and would hope Tesla would come up with a solution that doesn't require it either.
 

ldjessee

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I've never heard of someone disconnecting, to get fuel (though I'm sure there is the anecdotal story out there), and would hope Tesla would come up with a solution that doesn't require it either.
I have seen someone try to pull into a gas station with their huge 5th wheel and hit not only the bar that protects the pump, but at the same time hit the overhead with an airconditioner or something on the top of their 5th wheel. It was crunch-crunch... not a good day.

This was at a normal gas station and not like a truck-stop style gas station.
 

LoPro

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Admittedly I see my CT towing big trailers (boat as big as the road allows, travel trailer with elbow room, that sort of thing). I might have a different perspective if a small cargo trailer would do.

Seems likely to me, then, that many circumstances will suggest decoupling a trailer to charge. It isn't exactly a picnic to pull a big trailer through many US gas stations, either - it gets relatively easy at some truck stops off the interstates, but it'd be a total non-starter at the corner gas station in many towns. So what I'd like to see is trailer hookup and dropoff trivialized.

That can be easier or harder today. The status quo might involve hand-cranking the tongue jack, and practically crawling under the truck to disconnect/reconnect the safety chains and wire connector, wrestling with stuff that's gotten wet/dirty. Positioning the ball to reconnect things, most times today, is best done with two people and may have a big futz-factor. There are gadgets, such as electric tongue jacks, that help and some trucks have helpful features.

Hopefully I can tell the CT to do much of this stuff itself, and what remains to be done by hand can be made both hassle-free and safe. For instance, I would expect a CT to tell me if I'm trailering and don't have the trailer electrical hooked up properly, but I'd also expect it to make proper hookup trivial and almost unavoidable. I would expect it to stick its own ball directly under the socket on the trailer while I watch - keeping my finger on a button in the mobile app, much like Summon works. There's a lot of room for innovation here, some of it on the trailer side of the equation.

It could be less nerve-wracking to drop and reconnect the trailer than to guide it through many charging stations. What might make it so?
I have only seen mostly older back-in and newer pull-through superchargers here in Norway, and thought pull-through would be brilliant for both the CT and my Model 3 with trailer.

While the stalls in the pull-through a are fairly roomy, if you’re thinking of the CT with *really* big trailers, maybe the kind of supercharger I encountered in Køge, Denmark, is better? This type for backing out again is more common in Denmark at least, and it accepts variable length trailers attached. I assume backing out again into this spacious lot in front would be all right even with a big trailer? At least it means you’re never blocking anybody else as opposed to any sideways arrangement.
1617479735553.jpeg
 

Gary98

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As Repossession agent, I am purchasing this truck to repo my boats and travel trailers. People often hear me backing up to their units. This truck will be so quiet. I can't wait to have the first Tesla Cyber Truck repo rig
 

CostcoSamples

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I will occasionally borrow a camping trailer and pull it with my CT. I fully expect to have to disconnect the trailer in order to charge but I don't mind. Besides, where I live there are so few Teslas that it is rare to see a single vehicle charging.
 

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I will be towing a 16’ flatbed utility trailer as well as a medium size travel trailer. I fully expect having to disconnect prior to charging and will plan this accordingly.
For me the amount of times I will actually be in tow mode should not be a concern.
 

Hunter

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How about towing up and down a steep hill? Where is the breaking point when a heavy load meets a steep hill? In other words, if I know I'm going to have to climb a hill with a load, how do I know the motors can handle it, both up and down.

Our M3 does ok on steep hills, but that's only with it's own weight.

I'm also wondering about towing a flat bed trailer with cement on it up our ~30%, ~300 yard driveway, or also about hauling a fully loaded utility trailer over a high, steep Sierra pass near where I live?

BTW, we did take our M3 over Teton Pass and that was quite an experience, not just going up but also going back down. Experienced clunking from the battery area of what has been reported as some sheet metal heating up and expanding from unusuially high battery heating. Wouldn't want to do this every day, but there are hundreds of people who drive over Teton pass every day with moderate loads in ICE rigs. But note that big rigs are excluded from driving over this pass due to too many run-away accidents in the past.

I could also see the fear of a run-away with CT+heavy load on a long down slope. (And we're talking dry roads. With chains is another story all-together, as I've not yet seen anything on trailer breaking hookups.)

For comparison, with my Toyota ICE truck I unlock the front hubs (i.e. disengage the front drive train from the front wheels), then put it in L4 (low 4 wheel drive), then I have 5 low gears to help deal with the steep moutain passes to adjust my speed. If you haven't driven Sonora Pass with a load, you should give it a try. It will teach you some things. I would think there might be an argument for a transmission of some sort EVEN on a CT, but I don't know. Just wondering how much torque the motors are capable of in unusual circumstances.
 
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