Will I need a armoured vehicle permit for Cybertruck in British Columbia?

Cyberwat

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Will I need a armoured vehicle permit to drive the Cybertruck in British Columbia?

Armoured Vehicles


Vehicles manufactured or adapted to protect their occupants from explosions and gunshots are considered armoured vehicles. Under British Columbia’s Armoured Vehicle and After-Market Compartment Control Act and Regulation, you must have a permit to operate an armoured vehicle.
A business that operates an armoured vehicle without a permit could face a fine up to $100,000. An individual who operates one without a permit could face a fine up to $10,000 and six months in jail. Additional fines can also be issued under the Offence Act.
Under the Armoured Vehicle and After-Market Compartment Control Act, it is also illegal to own, operate or use a vehicle that contains a concealed compartment that was installed after the vehicle was made.





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BillyGee

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I don't think it's explosion proof so it shouldn't apply, but I'm kind of amazed that you need a specific maple leaf for driving a ruggedized vehicle.
 

Roslyn

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Will I need a armoured vehicle permit to drive the Cybertruck in British Columbia?

Armoured Vehicles


Vehicles manufactured or adapted to protect their occupants from explosions and gunshots are considered armoured vehicles. Under British Columbia’s Armoured Vehicle and After-Market Compartment Control Act and Regulation, you must have a permit to operate an armoured vehicle.
A business that operates an armoured vehicle without a permit could face a fine up to $100,000. An individual who operates one without a permit could face a fine up to $10,000 and six months in jail. Additional fines can also be issued under the Offence Act.
Under the Armoured Vehicle and After-Market Compartment Control Act, it is also illegal to own, operate or use a vehicle that contains a concealed compartment that was installed after the vehicle was made.
It could be argued, persuasively, that the CT was not built or manufactured [in order to] protect their occupants from explosions .... Its being somewhat bullet-proof, for example, was not a purposeful result, but rather incidental to its overall toughness.
 

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It could be argued, persuasively, that the CT was not built or manufactured [in order to] protect their occupants from explosions .... Its being somewhat bullet-proof, for example, was not a purposeful result, but rather incidental to its overall toughness.
The law doesn’t say “explosions AND gunshots”, it says “explosions OR gunshots.”

Having said that, I seriously doubt any Canadian authority is going to stir this particular pot.
 

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I don't think it's explosion proof so it shouldn't apply, but I'm kind of amazed that you need a specific maple leaf for driving a ruggedized vehicle.
'Peace, Order, and Good Government."
 

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Oh I'm sure some government jerk on a power trip will make a fuss about it at some point. But the bulletproof claim is only up to 9 mm, which is pretty tame. So any medium to large caliber pistol and basically any rifle will penetrate it. I think you can argue that it's not an armored vehicle.
 

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I think the "bulletproof" Cybertruck is more of a marketing tagline. Do true armored vehicles just have 3mm steel panels?
 

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I think the "bulletproof" Cybertruck is more of a marketing tagline. Do true armored vehicles just have 3mm steel panels?
I doubt a CT owner would be charged under this statute, the intent of which is to prevent civilians but acquiring military equipment to use on the streets impervious to law enforcers. (And this has happened -- with tanks, tractors, bulldozers, etc.) But if you were prosecuted, there could be at least two defenses:

All vehicles are explosion- and bullet-proof (or resistant) to some degree. because they'd all protect from a firecracker or stop a pellet. If supposed to mean a high-caliber projectile, if hit where? I'm sure most any engine would stop such, so are all motorized vehicles illegal? The law as is seems too vague to stand up in court.

If the CT did meet the military or law-enforcement definition of "armored personnel carrier" or somesuch, they'd save a fortune by ordering CTs, so demand that the Crown prove that's happening.
 

alan auerbach

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I doubt a CT owner would be charged under this statute, the intent of which is to prevent civilians but acquiring military equipment to use on the streets impervious to law enforcers. (And this has happened -- with tanks, tractors, bulldozers, etc.) But if you were prosecuted, there could be at least two defenses:

All vehicles are explosion- and bullet-proof (or resistant) to some degree. because they'd all protect from a firecracker or stop a pellet. If supposed to mean a high-caliber projectile, if hit where? I'm sure most any engine would stop such, so are all motorized vehicles illegal? The law as is seems too vague to stand up in court.

If the CT did meet the military or law-enforcement definition of "armored personnel carrier" or somesuch, they'd save a fortune by ordering CTs, so demand that the Crown prove that's happening.
"... illegal to own, operate or use a vehicle that contains a concealed compartment that was installed after the vehicle was made." Technically, toss an empty cookie package under the seat and you have created "a concealed compartment." But you can't thereby show up at a jail and hold out your arms for the cuffs. The authorities would have to decide to prosecute, and a court would have to decide to convict. (And the press would have to decide whether to cover it on page one or two.)
 

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Will I need a armoured vehicle permit to drive the Cybertruck in British Columbia?

Armoured Vehicles


Vehicles manufactured or adapted to protect their occupants from explosions and gunshots are considered armoured vehicles. Under British Columbia’s Armoured Vehicle and After-Market Compartment Control Act and Regulation, you must have a permit to operate an armoured vehicle.
A business that operates an armoured vehicle without a permit could face a fine up to $100,000. An individual who operates one without a permit could face a fine up to $10,000 and six months in jail. Additional fines can also be issued under the Offence Act.
Under the Armoured Vehicle and After-Market Compartment Control Act, it is also illegal to own, operate or use a vehicle that contains a concealed compartment that was installed after the vehicle was made.
What caliber "gunshot" are they referring to?
The Cybertruck WONT stop a 12 gauge slug or many other different ones, but a VW beetle can stop a 50 cal bullet...if the shot was attempted through the front of the engine block area.
 

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Will I need a armoured vehicle permit to drive the Cybertruck in British Columbia?

Armoured Vehicles


Vehicles manufactured or adapted to protect their occupants from explosions and gunshots are considered armoured vehicles. Under British Columbia’s Armoured Vehicle and After-Market Compartment Control Act and Regulation, you must have a permit to operate an armoured vehicle.
A business that operates an armoured vehicle without a permit could face a fine up to $100,000. An individual who operates one without a permit could face a fine up to $10,000 and six months in jail. Additional fines can also be issued under the Offence Act.
Under the Armoured Vehicle and After-Market Compartment Control Act, it is also illegal to own, operate or use a vehicle that contains a concealed compartment that was installed after the vehicle was made.
Just like with the Not A Flamethrower Tesla could call it Unarmoured Vehicle
 

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