SwampNut

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There is no neutral on the mobile connector, that's just a safety grounding point. You do not want your 400v car on a floating ground. The communication connectors tell the car everything about the supply. So with the mobile connector, and the correct pigtail, that tells the car the charge rate. I mentioned previously in some thread that I saw someone using the 14-50 pigtail with a third party adapter to 10-30. Bad bad bad, and they wondered why the breaker blew.

 

Bill906

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OMG, this guy is awesome!!! Found exactly what I was looking for.

Anyone want to see how all the high voltage stuff works, watch this video! It's long but I think worth the time. The part specific to how the car handles AC input vs DC input starts at about 11:53



And yes, the middle bottom pin is simply ground, not neutral. According to this guy, (and what I suspected) when Level 1 charging, one power connector is L1, the other is neutral. when level 2 charging one is L1 and the other is L2. (So from car's perspective, there is 120VAC or 240VAC between the two power connections).

And YES, there is a high power contactor (actually 2) that connects (and disconnects) the high power battery voltage to the two power connectors. One on each power connector (DC+ and DC-).
 

SwampNut

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That makes a lot more sense than leaving those connections live (and deadly). I haven't seen the previous thread you referenced. I confirmed no voltage on them.

Two of our e-bikes have battery-integrated drive systems, meaning the battery and drive is from the same vendor and they talk. No voltage unless they are powering the bike. One other is basically a mix and match, 72v all the time unless you manually disable the port. And the fourth I can't reach, I suspect it may be always on as it's branded, but the battery and motor are different vendors.
 

flowerlandfilms

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Park the car on a Pad, then have the snake come up from the floor and charge it from a port on the bottom. Customer never even sees it.
To paraphrase Texaco, "Trust your Wheels, to the service with the Eels".
I think I need to lie down for a minute.
 

TyPope

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It is charge port .vs. ICE gas cap mentality. A vestige.

Reminiscent of gas pumps, hoses and dirty smelly fill-ups the charge door opens from the past that the vehicle is not even a part. From designer inception to prototype the charge port has assumed the position. A position that it did not justify which flipping up begs to differ.

First principles, Cybertruck ports are better positioned in the vehicle as is the pumphose cum charge cord that currently hangs dutifully in-place like a gas pump. Inside like frunk inside – both sides if a pair. Ditto charge cord(s) ‘cuz Cybertruck owners will be charging in the damnedest places(backcountry, V2V, etc…) the CT owner who doesn’t need a cord? Few as the true utility of the 4680 batterypack ranges wider, farther and longer than where Tesla charge network ventures.
Yeah, no. My hood freezes closed when traveling and it'd be harder to warm the larger frunk than a small door on the fender.

 

 
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