anionic1

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I think it's pretty clear Tesla will not price any versions of the Cybertruck as high as $100,000. I'm not sure who keeps this nightmare, fear-monger tactic alive.



You still have doubts about Tesla's mission statement, even after they have dragged the entire industry kicking and screaming into electrification with large battery plants under construction across the USA.? No other company has done more to initiate this change.

Elon made the world wait for the Cybertuck due to unprecedented supply chain disruption and lack of batteries that basically would have caused an earlier release of the Cybertruck to slow down the mission by reducing sales of Models Y and 3.
The impression that I got from watching the shareholder event and the discussion around the cybertruck was not that they are going to try to make as many as they can to drive the cost down but rather this is an expensive vehicle to make and we'll build as many as people can afford. He didn't say, "We plan to ramp up to 1M trucks per year so we can really drive cost down". He said they are expensive to build and we will make as many as people can afford.

Anyone that can't step back and see that the CT is going to be their most expensive product to build is nuts. It will have the largest battery packs, biggest castings, it will weigh the most, it will have the most robust suspension and tires. It has the most expensive skin material cost. It has a tonneau cover, along with all the other stuff to make it versatile like the air compressors, on board high power tie ins, hitch. And it sounds like it will have the most expensive assembly line. But its not painted!

What's to stop them from allocating the battery packs to their already high demand vehicles that are more efficient and more readily achieve Tesla's mission statement than allocate them for a larger less efficient truck?
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HaulingAss

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Anyone that can't step back and see that the CT is going to be their most expensive product to build is nuts. It will have the largest battery packs, biggest castings, it will weigh the most, it will have the most robust suspension and tires. It has the most expensive skin material cost. It has a tonneau cover, along with all the other stuff to make it versatile like the air compressors, on board high power tie ins, hitch. And it sounds like it will have the most expensive assembly line. But its not painted!
I'm not nuts and I think the Cybertruck will cost less to build, a lot less, than the Model X and Model S Plaid and will be built in much higher numbers, leading to economiies of scale. The Model S and X are hand-built on production lines going back 20 years, Cybertruck benefits from the synergy of all of Tesla's previous learnings and technological advancements. It is designed, from the ground up to be a revolutionary new platform that can be easily mass-produced. It's not easy to develop such radical departures from traditional auto-manufacturing but the result should be a major step-change in production efficiency. Remember, the price of a vehicle does not necessarily reflect what you get so much as it reflects the ability of a manufacturer to re-envision manufacturing to build the vehicles faster, more efficiently and with less factory floor space.

What's to stop them from allocating the battery packs to their already high demand vehicles that are more efficient and more readily achieve Tesla's mission statement than allocate them for a larger less efficient truck?
You haven't been paying attention, Tesla has projected nearly flat 2023 vehicle production numbers relative to the run rate in the first quarter of 2023. While simultaneously projecting ever increasing battery production and availability from third party suppliers. In other words, in 2024 Tesla will need vehicles to put them (in addition to maxing out production of Models 3 and Y).

Furthermore, nothing will do more to reduce pollution and greenhouse gas emissions than using increasing battery supply, at ever decreasing prices, to start displacing the least efficient and most polluting vehicles on the road: Pickups and Semi-trucks. The fact that the Cybertruck will have somewhat larger battery packs than Models 3 and Y is more than made up for by the fact that they will be displacing sales of the least efficient, most polluting vehicles on the road. The only reason they didn't do this sooner is because they would have been prohibitively expensive before the batteries continued further down the price decline curve. Displacing one ICE pick-up truck is much more beneficial than displacing one ICE passenger car.

Increasing battery supply allows Tesla to increase production of passenger cars as well as pick-ups and semis. This ain't rocket science. It's always been a given that trucks would be transitioned to EV when the time was right, why are you surprised it's happening now? Did you really expect Tesla would not displace ICE trucks until all the ICE car sales had already been fully displaced?
 
 




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