HaulingAss

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Wtf is he even talking about saying its not as expensive as a diesel or king ranch. He just paid 110k out the door for that fucking thing if its just the 2 motor, 130k if beast
Obviously, he is comparing the price of the non-Foundation Series Cybertrucks, without all the accessories, without Full-Self-driving, etc.
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GuyV

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I don't know why anyone would say it's 'overloaded'. 1800 lbs is much less than the 2500 lb payload limit specification. The air suspension readjusted nicely after they finished loading it so I don't see any problem at all.

However, I think it would be cool if they could've put a weighing scale built in to the rear air suspension, to give an on screen indication of how much weight is in the vault. Could be useful also to the software for limiting certain things when it is actually 'overloaded'.

- ÆCIII
Considering their original payload target I suspect the truck and suspension are designed to handle more but class and tire considerations limit what they currently offer.
 

HaulingAss

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OK, if that's not stating the obvious! That's true of every pickup on the market.

Trucks from manufacturers that quote maximum payload often have that payload reduced quite a bit once the truck is optioned up. While Tesla has some accessories, like the Extended Range battery and the Cybertent that will reduce the maximum payload, it's one of the only trucks that already has a tonneau cover included in the curb weight (and a powered one at that) and that doesn't need a bedliner or running boards for ease of entry.
 

HaulingAss

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Tesla tends to keep the tires at maximum by default. Higher pressure, stiffer tire, lower rolling resistance.
I'm not aware of any Tesla that has a recommended pressure that is the maximum sidewall pressure. For example, our Model 3's have a recommended pressure of 42 psi, but come equipped with tires rated to 50 psi.
 

HaulingAss

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Well, the whole vault is over the rear axles, and the payload spec is for the vault. The rear axle air suspension re-leveled itself just fine didn't it? Plus we've got 700 lbs to spare.
That's not how any truck's payload rating works. The payload is always the weight of all cargo, passengers and accessories that is in addition to the bare truck.

And the payload capacity is generally, but not always, the sum total of the front axle and rear axle payload capacity. Check the recently released Owner's Manual for the rated capacities and you will see the weight capacity ratings for the front and rear axles listed seperately. This is how all trucks are rated.
 


ÆCIII

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So Payload Capacity is everything including passengers, vault/frunk, even trailer hitch weight all in total as @Keeney pointed out, so I dare say I learned (or relearned) something correctly here.

So the guy was likely close to or pushing the limits at least a little, but a lot depends on the distance too, how careful one will be driving and attentive to the load, and also the tire pressures.

I'm still maintaining a little optimism because of the way the Cybertruck readjusted it's height easily, and because Tesla has sandbagged capability sometimes in the past to assure performance in various situations. Time will tell.

Now if the guy had pulled away with those tires still nearly touching the top of the fender well, then I'd be more concerned but again, the air suspension adjusted nicely. I wished they had continued the video as they hauled the load to their destination.

- ÆCIII
 
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SolarWizard

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It’s a truck. Why wouldn’t you do this? It’s not close to its capacity. I believe videos like this showing people actually using it as a truck will be great.
At least one of the two guys riding isn’t slender. If 4 were onboard its max. Not questioning the performance just providing info
 

HaulingAss

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So Payload Capacity is everything including passengers, vault/frunk, even trailer hitch weight all in total as @Keeney pointed out, so I dare say I learned (or relearned) something correctly here.

So the guy was likely close to or pushing the limits at least a little, but a lot depends on the distance too, how careful one will be driving and attentive to the load, and also the tire pressures.
Unless you can convince me that is not 5/8" sheetrock, he was way, way over the rear axle load limit. And I'm surprised he didn't damage the tailgate, unless perhaps the roads were as smooth as a peice of sheetrock and he drove like grandma. Dynamic loading is why you will see so many photos of bent and mangled pickups if you Google "bent pickup frame".

If that Cybertruck's tailgate survived that trip, that's one tough tailgate!

People who don't have experience breaking things by towing and hauling need to respect the load limits. Sheetrock is one of the most dense loads, of all common loads, and that is quite a stack. Don't get me wrong, I've overloaded trucks my entire life, and mostly got away with it, but you have to know what you're doing and respect the forces involved.
 


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Due to the weight of the load, and the manner in which the center of gravity of the load sits behind the rear axle, that Cybertruck is loaded significantly past the allowed load of the rear axle.

When the center of gravity of a load is behind the rear axle, it transfers some of the weight off the front axle. That loads the rear axle more than the actual weight of the load. I know it might sound impossible to some, but what is happening is that some of the weight of the truck is being transferred from the front axle to the rear axle. And the rear axle of the Dual Motor is rated to accomodate 1698 lbs. above its unloaded weight. It is indisputable that if that drywall actually weighs 1800 lbs. the Cybertruck is over-loaded far beyond its rated capacity. By my estimation, with one 200 lb. driver, and no other cargo, the rear axle is loaded somewhere around 600-800 lbs. over its rated limit of 5,062 lbs.(Curb Weight of the rear axle is 3,364 lbs.). Basically, it's over-loaded by roughly 12%-16%. It could be more than that depending upon how far the center of gravity is behind the rear axle.

This is always a concern, on any truck, whenever loads have a CoG behind the rear axle. That said, most trucks will not be damaged by loading past their rated limits, assuming speeds are low and roads are smooth. I would probably be more cautious about over-loading the Cybertruck because of its air suspension.

edit: Where did the 1800 lb. estimate for the load come from? Looking at it more closely, I think we're looking at 34 sheets of 5/8" 4x8 sheetrock. If so, the weight is over 2,400 lbs. and the truck is grossly overloaded.

I love seeing the Cybertruck in its element, but if that's 5/8" sheetrock, this is irresponsible (due to the load center being behind the rear axle).

I'd've settled for 8' sheets
 
 




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