Cybertruck Tires

Challeco

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I have found that soft/sipped tires are the best in winter on compact snow and ice, not necessarily big tires or aggressive tread. I laugh when the jacked up trucks with gnarly tires get stuck and I cruise through in a Subaru. The high profile trucks and SUV with stiff suspensions end up sliding off the road as well.

I do my best to have a set of tires mounted on wheels for the winter and a separate set for the warmer months. I live between three passes that can get nasty quickly in the winter months. It is less expensive and less painful to have a separate winter set, than it is to damage or be damaged because someone loses control on our wintered passes.
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John K

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If the CT gets 10-15% less miles per charge with the 35" tires shown (or similar) there will be some very disappointed people. Obviously I am hoping that a roadworthy wheel package will actually increase stated range.

I am sure there will be an option.
With sensible tires, maybe 610 can be achieved.
 

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I drive So Californian freeways. My biggest worry is severe storms, 1 mm of rain. It is not the rain, many drivers here forget what they are doing when a couple raindrops appear. 😀
The first rain after a long hot summer of ICE vehicles dripping oil on the road can be quite hazardous.
 

Crissa

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SoCal roads turn into ice rinks with a little rain! All that oil build-up...

I remember one summer I had just come down from Oregon, I was in the inland empire - Temecula - and it just rained. I slid up an offramp from the freeway. Woo!

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I would call that a little misleading then. They showed 35s with aggressive tread. I might let them off the hook if they lost the sidewall tread. I would like 90 highway/10 off road tire anyway but I am hoping I will gain a couple miles over the rating with that compromise.
I wouldn't call that misleading. Lots of vehicles are shown as what they look really good as. Sports cars might be displayed with performance tires, a truck might have a commercial with huge mud tires and then they are sold with just normal small stock tires.

Also for a lot of people, what the Cybertruck can do is what is getting their attention. I've read a lot of people say that they only want the Cybertruck because it's getting because of the range. While some people might prefer that Tesla called it a 450 mile (guessing) range truck and have the extra range be a happy surprise, other people might not have even considered switching from an ICE truck to the Cybertruck.

Also most car commercials showing a specific model of a vehicle will often show the top trim level of that vehicle. Then they will say "Starting at $#####" Then if you go look at the vehicle, that car for that price might not have the leather seats or the navigation, lane assist, the nice rims.

Now it might seem a little misleading but Tesla will be more upfront than other companies. This is what you see when you change tires on the Tesla order page. They tell you as you are changing wheels that the range will change. The Cybertruck will probably have standard wheels that reflect the range that will be shown on the website, but I doubt it'll be exactly the same as the ones on the prototype. I'm just hoping that it gets the range with the same wheel covers, some people really don't like them but I think they look really good ont he truck.

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Tinker71

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I wouldn't call that misleading. Lots of vehicles are shown as what they look really good as. Sports cars might be displayed with performance tires, a truck might have a commercial with huge mud tires and then they are sold with just normal small stock tires.

Also for a lot of people, what the Cybertruck can do is what is getting their attention. I've read a lot of people say that they only want the Cybertruck because it's getting because of the range. While some people might prefer that Tesla called it a 450 mile (guessing) range truck and have the extra range be a happy surprise, other people might not have even considered switching from an ICE truck to the Cybertruck.

Also most car commercials showing a specific model of a vehicle will often show the top trim level of that vehicle. Then they will say "Starting at $#####" Then if you go look at the vehicle, that car for that price might not have the leather seats or the navigation, lane assist, the nice rims.

Now it might seem a little misleading but Tesla will be more upfront than other companies. This is what you see when you change tires on the Tesla order page. They tell you as you are changing wheels that the range will change. The Cybertruck will probably have standard wheels that reflect the range that will be shown on the website, but I doubt it'll be exactly the same as the ones on the prototype. I'm just hoping that it gets the range with the same wheel covers, some people really don't like them but I think they look really good on the truck.

1624259558051.png
1624259576501.png
Basically what I am saying is that the standard wheels better look pretty close to the tires at reveal or on the web page AND deliver the 250/300/500 mile range. The plus part may very well come from a highway optimized tire offered (might even be a deduct?)

Tesla has some wiggle room on the tires. Specs say up to 16" of clearance... while most of that is in the suspension travel, 35s play a big roll. I know tire/wheels played a big part in EV but I am still a little bit floored that it is 10%. I get mass, centripetal forces, contact area, deflection at the road etc. at a laymen's level but that is still a massive difference. I doubt the $4500 upgrade wheel on the S is a steel wheel without efficiency considerations.

The gnarly 35s with sidewall tread is about as bad as you can get given the size. On a theoretical basis if you put low mass railroad wheels on the CT what is the high end of the range improvement.? 20%? I know Adelange did some pretty good calculations on energy consumption. I will see if the answer is already there.
 

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Basically what I am saying is that the standard wheels better look pretty close to the tires at reveal or on the web page AND deliver the 250/300/500 mile range. The plus part may very well come from a highway optimized tire offered (might even be a deduct?)

Tesla has some wiggle room on the tires. Specs say up to 16" of clearance... while most of that is in the suspension travel, 35s play a big roll. I know tire/wheels played a big part in EV but I am still a little bit floored that it is 10%. I get mass, centripetal forces, contact area, deflection at the road etc. at a laymen's level but that is still a massive difference. I doubt the $4500 upgrade wheel on the S is a steel wheel without efficiency considerations.

The gnarly 35s with sidewall tread is about as bad as you can get given the size. On a theoretical basis if you put low mass railroad wheels on the CT what is the high end of the range improvement.? 20%? I know Adelange did some pretty good calculations on energy consumption. I will see if the answer is already there.
*Ajdelange Sorry bro Belgian Canadians can be particular. After a brief search I couldn't fine your math. Do you have the parts specific to the wheels and inertia?
 

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Basically what I am saying is that the standard wheels better look pretty close to the tires at reveal or on the web page AND deliver the 250/300/500 mile range. The plus part may very well come from a highway optimized tire offered (might even be a deduct?)

Tesla has some wiggle room on the tires. Specs say up to 16" of clearance... while most of that is in the suspension travel, 35s play a big roll. I know tire/wheels played a big part in EV but I am still a little bit floored that it is 10%. I get mass, centripetal forces, contact area, deflection at the road etc. at a laymen's level but that is still a massive difference. I doubt the $4500 upgrade wheel on the S is a steel wheel without efficiency considerations.

The gnarly 35s with sidewall tread is about as bad as you can get given the size. On a theoretical basis if you put low mass railroad wheels on the CT what is the high end of the range improvement.? 20%? I know Adelange did some pretty good calculations on energy consumption. I will see if the answer is already there.
So obviously we are all just guessing here. I can't say for sure that the range on the wheels that the Cybertruck was unveiled on won't be able to be improved upon with a simple purchase of more efficient rims/tires, i just don't find it realistic. I don't really see Tesla estimating 500+ range on the Cybertruck with tires if they know they could tell everyone 600+ miles of range if they just had more efficient tires.

With over a million preorders, I'm guessing the majority of people aren't going to do actual offroading. Most of those people are going to be just using their truck for daily driving and loading up the bed for work or home projects. The majority of people are going to be just fine with any tire that gets them the most range and that's more likely what the Cybertruck will list as the actual range when it's starting deliveries.

It is still possible that the 500+ miles of range is actually 600+ miles of range, as hinted in the patent pictures. IF that's the case, we already get another 20%
 
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