Does Cybertruck need mega-castings too?

lqdchkn

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Can you elaborate on which "Body on frame Vehicle" in Tesla's lineup you are referring to which is using the mega casting?

Also, I really have no clue what they are going to do. Just took an educated guess. Im sure we will find out soon enough!
All of their current models are "body on frame". That is to say that the passenger compartment is a separate part from the frame of the vehicle. The body removes from frame and the frame is the unit that provides all the rigidity for the vehicle.

Cybertruck will not have a passenger compartment that is removable from the support structure of the truck as it will be one structural unit.

This will give you the gist of the difference visually






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There was some news regarding a new alloy that they developed for the mega casting.
 

lqdchkn

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There was some news regarding a new alloy that they developed for the mega casting.
Yeah Elon said they had to come up with a new alloy that was castable in such a large capacity but did not need heat treating to maintain strength.
 

Jhodgesatmb

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There was some news regarding a new alloy that they developed for the mega casting.
That was so that they could make the casting at all and still have nominal structural characteristics but, yes, they did talk about its strength to that extent. But they never spoke of the rear end casting as being stronger or stiffer or better in any way than reducing the number of parts. That is what I meant.
 

Ehninger1212

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All of their current models are "body on frame". That is to say that the passenger compartment is a separate part from the frame of the vehicle. The body removes from frame and the frame is the unit that provides all the rigidity for the vehicle.

Cybertruck will not have a passenger compartment that is removable from the support structure of the truck as it will be one structural unit.

This will give you the gist of the difference visually

Lol thanks for the video.. I fully understand the difference between body on frame and uni-body. The only vehicle in Tesla current line up that I imagine is body on frame is the Semi, which isn't even in production yet. Everything else is uni-body construction, The Cybertruck is arguably an enhanced version of a Uni-body vehicle.

So again, Why wouldn't Tesla use mega casting underneath the cybertruck to create a simple, solid and affordable structure to mount things too? I'm not saying they will.. but they put a TON of effort creating this new technology for casting massive pieces of undercarriage structure. WHY wouldn't they utilize it on the cybertruck!? The Austin factory is being specifically built for it.
 

Jhodgesatmb

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Lol thanks for the video.. I fully understand the difference between body on frame and uni-body. The only vehicle in Tesla current line up that I imagine is body on frame is the Semi, which isn't even in production yet. Everything else is uni-body construction, The Cybertruck is arguably an enhanced version of a Uni-body vehicle.

So again, Why wouldn't Tesla use mega casting underneath the cybertruck to create a simple, solid and affordable structure to mount things too? I'm not saying they will.. but they put a TON of effort creating this new technology for casting massive pieces of undercarriage structure. WHY wouldn't they utilize it on the cybertruck!? The Austin factory is being specifically built for it.
And they might. All I was saying is that they haven’t spoken of it’s strength characteristics as a bonus. If the casting is as strong in every way as the non single part version, then that is great for the M3/Y. But the CT has requirements that we’ll exceed these other vehicles so they might have to redesign the machine altogether. It would be cool if they could pull it off properly.
 

lqdchkn

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Lol thanks for the video.. I fully understand the difference between body on frame and uni-body. The only vehicle in Tesla current line up that I imagine is body on frame is the Semi, which isn't even in production yet. Everything else is uni-body construction, The Cybertruck is arguably an enhanced version of a Uni-body vehicle.

So again, Why wouldn't Tesla use mega casting underneath the cybertruck to create a simple, solid and affordable structure to mount things too? I'm not saying they will.. but they put a TON of effort creating this new technology for casting massive pieces of undercarriage structure. WHY wouldn't they utilize it on the cybertruck!? The Austin factory is being specifically built for it.
Just because it's one big body part doenst make it uni-body, whether it's structural or not does. If Tesla is claiming "stiffness" benefits of the casting+battery+casting design, then thats structural and thus a frame making the cars body on frame.

Im not saying CT wont have castings for subframe components but as those are not a structural frame component they wont be the same.
 
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If the casting is as strong in every way as the non single part version, then that is great for the M3/Y. But the CT has requirements that we’ll exceed these other vehicles so they might have to redesign the machine altogether. It would be cool if they could pull it off properly.
I agree 100%. That was the point of my original question.

6,000 pounds of Cybertruck doing high speed off-roading with payload of 3,500 lbs suffers massively more stresses and forces than Model-3/Y LR Dual (GVWR 5,302 lbs ) on a standard highway.

Even if the special aluminum Tesla uses is up to the job the casting would need to be much beefier. But the mega-caster machine is already world record setting. Could the mega-caster make such a beefier casting?
 

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Just because it's one big body part doenst make it uni-body, whether it's structural or not does. If Tesla is claiming "stiffness" benefits of the casting+battery+casting design, then thats structural and thus a frame making the cars body on frame.

Im not saying CT wont have castings for subframe components but as those are not a structural frame component they wont be the same.
When the CT was at the Petersen someone took pix of the underside of the truck and I seem to recall it looking like the stainless went all the way across. It makes one wonder how they would get the pack in and out. No, I was mistaken. Here is that photo.

9F180A4C-A71F-431D-B955-4951A2A1C2B4.jpeg
 
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firsttruck

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When the CT was at the Petersen someone took pix of the underside of the truck and I seem to recall it looking like the stainless went all the way across. It makes one wonder how they would get the pack in and out. No, I was mistaken. Here is that photo.

9F180A4C-A71F-431D-B955-4951A2A1C2B4.jpeg
Nice pic put the picture does not show us the area of the truck we are talking about.

We need a picture of the area at the top of the air shocks.
What are the shocks attached to.
 
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Crissa

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Usually, fewer parts is stronger than more parts.

That a part is cast hard doesn't mean it cannot have shapes or tie into other parts for strength.

Elon has said the genius of the Cybertruck is that most of the strength is in those stainless panels. So if it uses aluminum mega castings, it's only as some sort of internal angle brackets to increase the stiffness of the folded steel pieces. Filler. Shapes to hold equipment between the steel plates.

The design of the Cybertruck was set before they had megacasting equipment. And is meant to be as simple as possible.

-Crissa

PS, the motors will be in-board and axial, along the rear axle, because that's how Tesla does it. Not straddling the battery pack.
 

Sirfun

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If your concerned about the aluminum and all the chemicals your going to be pouring all over your truck, definitely don't buy an f-150. :giggle:
My brother in law is a pool dr. and his 5 yr. old Ford is spent. So yes, chemicals bad. :oops:
 

Ehninger1212

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My brother in law is a pool dr. and his 5 yr. old Ford is spent. So yes, chemicals bad. :oops:
Does his have the all aluminum body??
 

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Interesting discussion. I think having a mega casting on the CT is pretty counterproductive. The point of the CT is as cheap and easy as possible.

To me this would mean something like the 3mm stainless as the frame/body and just having simple cutoffs for brackets welded where needed to mount things, also perhaps 2 mirrored, thin stampings for the cab area
 

Crissa

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Interesting discussion. I think having a mega casting on the CT is pretty counterproductive. The point of the CT is as cheap and easy as possible.

To me this would mean something like the 3mm stainless as the frame/body and just having simple cutoffs for brackets welded where needed to mount things, also perhaps 2 mirrored, thin stampings for the cab area
Maybe. The castings are very cheap when you're making alot of them. Fold the body, plug the casting in as a single piece bracket hanging from it to attach the electronics. Less welding, more snap-and-go.

-Crissa
 

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