Does Stainless Steel shield EMP?

TyPope

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? … ?

Until a real electrical engineer jumps in to correct me…because the metal enclosures would have to fully isolate the electronics. For that electronics to communicate with the world outside the box, you’d probably need optical interfaces so an electrical surge wouldn’t follow wires into the box. Might need a battery inside the box, too, so no electrons pass.

That might be worth the expense and space if you’re designing a military aircraft whose purpose is surviving World War III to bomb the other country, but few Cybertruck buyers are willing to pay the price in money and compromised everyday performance to survive something we may never face. It might push the Cybertruck to near-Hummer bloat ?

And I’m unsure I’d want to survive all out nuclear war to face a brief and brutal life, scavenging for food produced before our agricultural system had most of its critical links evaporated. Better to live fully with my nimble Cybertruck before the apocalypse.
LOL. This discussion is funny and you are actually the closest to being correct. Any conductor sticking through a faraday cage is a conduit to allow EMP to do it's damage. Maintaining the EMP characteristics of missile silos and launch control facilities is serious business. If a signal can get out, a signal can get in. If you air-gap your comm, that would be a good start. I'm not an ELECTRICAL engineer but AM an INDUSTRIAL engineer and a student with about half a year left on his Masters degree from the school of advanced nuclear deterrence studies. Part of our studies is visiting our nuclear locations including the labs like Los Alamos National Lab, Sandia National Lab, etc. We get detailed briefs.

Also, you DON'T want metalic window tint - it kills cell reception. In the event of a nuclear war, I can offer this advice - Don't be near nuclear explosions. See? This degree is already paying off!

 

TyPope

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Yes, all it takes is metal at the right density and pattern.

The problem is, for every flux it's a different density and for every frequency it's a different pattern.

You can also block it with a magnetic field of your own, which is how the magnetic fields of the earth work; but when they collapse you take extra energy instead of less.

-Crissa
Note: Our nuclear capable aircraft are EMP hardened. It isn't technically difficult to achieve.
 

Crissa

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Note: Our nuclear capable aircraft are EMP hardened. It isn't technically difficult to achieve.
Hardened doesn't mean they'd be happy about it. Here I was replying to how faraday cages work.

Like I said earlier, modern electronics are much more aware of electrocapacitance of their chassis and components, and so many may just be more durable than we expect. We don't really know, because such information is considered secret - either industrial or national defense - so it's not a rating you can get off the shelf.

As more companies look to work in space, we'll probably start seeing ratings become public knowledge.

-Crissa
 
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OP
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DAMN! All I have it aluminum foil hats.
yeah, the alien lizard people had the world switch from tin to aluminum so that even when we thought we were being protected by our hats, they could still read our thoughts. If you want true protection, you need to go find a legacy roll of tin foil to make your hat with.

The conspiracy is far deeper than previously thought.
 

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To the OP yes anything conductive can be made into a faraday cage, a car with openings for windows and what not does not make a good faraday cage.

Its the wires that pick up the EMP and different length wires will be susceptible to different frequencies in the pulse. The wires act like antennas and pick up energy from the pulse which causes a voltage spike. Its that voltage spike that takes out the electronics.

Dirt, concrete, and rock attenuate the signal, as does everything else including your body, they are good at blocking signals because they typically have a lot of dirt, concrete, or rock in between. Yes the rebar helps too.

Hardening largely consists of putting in circuitry to handle the spike that gets generated on the wires that run between the boxes, and building a faraday cage around the actual electronics.

Back in the day my Father did work with a few auto manufacturers when they started putting computers in cars. The problem they were having is when someone would drive near a radio station tower sometimes the cars would do something weird like suddenly accelerate or the door locks start cycling, or even the engine just die. Cars are already mildly protected as a result.
 

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Cell phones work in cars because cars are not Faraday cages. Cell phones do not work in microwave ovens because they are Faraday cages for a range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation that include the waves that cook food and that cell phones use to communicate. You can see into a microwave oven because the array of holes behind the window are too small for those waves, but not for lightwaves. I don’t know the frequencies in an EMP, so I don’t know how fine the cage would need to be.

Anyway, our Cybertrucks will not be invulnerable to EMPs.
Put my cell phone in the microwave (did not turn it on HA) called it from my land line, guess what, it rang as usual)
 

ReddykwRun

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I'm surprised as those are pretty good faraday cages.
We had one in the military shop I worked in, nice shiny copper screen, great for keeping those pesky killer bionic mosquitos out.
 

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Just attach a ground wire to exoskeleton and drag on the ground. Not only is EMP safely grounded away, energy is return in regen system charging your battery.


(I think I broke @Crissa’s mind in where to start how wrong I am)
 

JBee

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Put my cell phone in the microwave (did not turn it on HA) called it from my land line, guess what, it rang as usual)
Whats even more scary is that the phone wifi still works whilst placed in the microwave too and that it is running the same frequency but at a 1000th of the power of the microwave. Look up scalar/longitudinal wave propagation as to why.

I remember my 2001 Land Rover was allergic to the local chemist cash register. The immobiliser worked better than it should there 3-4 times until we stopped going near there and it never happened again.

Besides I thought we all had to get vaxxed to improve our 5G reception so why would they need to use a EMP on us sheeple anyway? :p

The best advice for anything nuclear is don't be anywhere near a target, and if you are not for long, especially while a country is starting a war. My CT will be parked in a double skinned windowless metal building 600km from the nearest target, that is unless their target is to make glass from sand and roo fossils in a 3000sqkm national park surrounded by broad acre farms.
 
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LOL. This discussion is funny and you are actually the closest to being correct. Any conductor sticking through a faraday cage is a conduit to allow EMP to do it's damage. Maintaining the EMP characteristics of missile silos and launch control facilities is serious business. If a signal can get out, a signal can get in. If you air-gap your comm, that would be a good start. I'm not an ELECTRICAL engineer but AM an INDUSTRIAL engineer and a student with about half a year left on his Masters degree from the school of advanced nuclear deterrence studies. Part of our studies is visiting our nuclear locations including the labs like Los Alamos National Lab, Sandia National Lab, etc. We get detailed briefs.

Also, you DON'T want metalic window tint - it kills cell reception. In the event of a nuclear war, I can offer this advice - Don't be near nuclear explosions. See? This degree is already paying off!
In my past I was a USAF ICBM Launch Crew Commander. Shortly after that I was the Director of Technical Engineering for a ICBM Wing and later I worked for the weapon system's prime contractor as an electrical engineer on that project. We had to understand EMP effects, the launch crews had procedures and the system had functions designed and built for dealing with EMP effects as needed to successfully complete our mission. I'm certain that those functions and procedures have been improved since then. So, here are a couple of comments about this thread.

1. No automobile will ever be built to withstand an EMP, but I don't worry about that; it is not useful because,
2. If you are in an area affected by an EMP generated by a high-altitude nuclear explosion, you will soon experience the much more damaging effects of additional nuclear explosions much closer to the ground (or their aftermath), so you won't care about the EMP for very long.
3. TyPope is right about not wanting to be near a nuclear explosion. We used to say that the minimum recommended distance is far enough that, if you could hear it at all, you might say to someone, "Hey... Did you just hear something??"
 
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TyPope

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In my past I was a USAF ICBM Launch Crew Commander. Shortly after that I was the Director of Technical Engineering for a ICBM Wing and later I worked for the weapon system's prime contractor as an electrical engineer on that project. We had to understand EMP effects, the launch crews had procedures and the system had functions designed and built for dealing with EMP effects as needed to successfully complete our mission. I'm certain that those functions and procedures have been improved since then. So, here are a couple of comments about this thread.

1. No automobile will ever be built to withstand an EMP, but I don't worry about that; it is not useful because,
2. If you are in an area affected by an EMP generated by a high-altitude nuclear explosion, you will soon experience the much more damaging effects of additional nuclear explosions much closer to the ground (or their aftermath), so you won't care about the EMP for very long.
3. TyPope is right about not wanting to be near a nuclear explosion. We used to say that the minimum recommended distance is far enough that, if you could hear it at all, you might say to someone, "Hey... Did you just hear something??"
Yeah, I was a 21M... MASO, MMT, QA, MOO, DTRA Inspector/Trainer... Now, Ops Analyst at STRATCOM... Tough to figure out what threads I want to reply to a d which I need to just let go. LOL. (526th '01-'04 and 91st '10-'14)

 

 

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