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Hope this doesn’t happen with the CyberTruck

Newton

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Putting in shims and straps is very common in older vehicles as we learn about long-term wear of parts.

'More bolts' isn't always the answer. Holes create weak points.

-Crissa
Wait what. Where is this little tid bit of info from? Please elaborate if you can. Shims and straps for something that has worn and become out of spec, sure. But purposely doing it to put it into spec? That's just sketchy. Imo
Patches like that strapping thing is what I would have and infact have done as a young man while building things like weedwacker engine bikes, lawnmower go carts, etc.

A couple more reinforced holes in the firewall would be quite easy to do. And permanent.
 

Crissa

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Wait what. Where is this little tid bit of info from?
Clearly you've never looked closely at alot of warranty repairs. Or worked on a Jeep. They do try to make the shims professional looking, but in those cases they have time to prepare a solution to everyone over a year or so. We're looking at a repair that was put in place in days.

And if the condenser is pulling from the mounts, how would more bolts in the firewall help? It would need more spots to put the bolts in the condenser.

-Crissa
 

CyberMoose

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I don't see any problem with it. If it works, it works. It's a hidden piece that seems to me like it will function perfectly fine.

I understand where people are coming from when they see that because it looks unprofessional and like they rigged something together with no planning. But they probably changed out something, maybe they got a new compressor and it was smaller. They probably decided they wanted to secure it more than it was and i'm guessing this wasn't their first choice but it is a fast and effective method. For someone like me, if I find that, I'm fine with it because it works and I doubt I would ever have a problem with it.
 

Newton

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Clearly you've never looked closely at alot of warranty repairs. Or worked on a Jeep. They do try to make the shims professional looking, but in those cases they have time to prepare a solution to everyone over a year or so. We're looking at a repair that was put in place in days.

And if the condenser is pulling from the mounts, how would more bolts in the firewall help? It would need more spots to put the bolts in the condenser.

-Crissa
That's exactly my point. Warranty repairs, meaning something like "well as long as it works through warranty, its good" this is not what anyone should be doing especially tesla. Jeep is shit and has been for many, many years.

And for the mount, I dont know the issue and exactly why they did what they did but I was thinking something even like 2 all thread bolts the length of the case above and below with a u shaped metal end cap with rubber between it and the condensor. Simple easy does the same as the strap albeit with a bit more work but you can torque it to a spec and easily remove tighten, loosen etc, like a part should be.

Blue is condensor orange is u shaped end cap, purple is 1 of 2 all.thread bolts other 1 on bottom

20200911_002826.jpg
 

CyberMoose

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That's exactly my point. Warranty repairs, meaning something like "well as long as it works through warranty, its good" this is not what anyone should be doing especially tesla. Jeep is shit and has been for many, many years.

And for the mount, I dont know the issue and exactly why they did what they did but I was thinking something even like 2 all thread bolts the length of the case above and below with a u shaped metal end cap with rubber between it and the condensor. Simple easy does the same as the strap albeit with a bit more work but you can torque it to a spec and easily remove tighten, loosen etc, like a part should be.

Blue is condensor orange is u shaped end cap, purple is 1 of 2 all.thread bolts other 1 on bottom

20200911_002826.jpg
Is this under the assumption that they have enough of these parts that you are describing for thousands of vehicles. I'm confident that they probably ordered new parts for this purpose but what do they do until then, go to every single hardware store they can find, buy out every single one of what can fit? They would have to find the right dimensions that are necessary and then buy several different types from several different stores just to keep production going without being sure if they'll have enough. If they don't have enough, do we just stop production?

The only thing I really see different from what you are suggesting and what was done is appearance.

If you were to take apart a bunch of cars or even houses, which I have done both, you will find things that fall under the category of "well, that will work". Maybe not in every single unit, but it is a common practise to make something work. Also a big thing to consider is that this is something that doesn't move, doesn't bend, doesn't do anything but helps prevent the condenser from moving when hitting bumps or anything that will bounce the car. This won't be the reason that people are taking their cars in for service.
 

Crissa

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Long bolts? Instead of a strap? Why?
And you still needed the spreader anyhow, so that design doesn't solve the hodge-podge problem while being more expensive and bringing new points of failure (bolts through a plate don't move as one like a strap would).

-Crissa
 

Newton

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Its not just a visual change at all. Your car isn't put together with straps for a reason.
Is this under the assumption that they have enough of these parts that you are describing for thousands of vehicles. I'm confident that they probably ordered new parts for this purpose but what do they do until then, go to every single hardware store they can find, buy out every single one of what can fit? They would have to find the right dimensions that are necessary and then buy several different types from several different stores just to keep production going without being sure if they'll have enough. If they don't have enough, do we just stop production?

The only thing I really see different from what you are suggesting and what was done is appearance.

If you were to take apart a bunch of cars or even houses, which I have done both, you will find things that fall under the category of "well, that will work". Maybe not in every single unit, but it is a common practise to make something work. Also a big thing to consider is that this is something that doesn't move, doesn't bend, doesn't do anything but helps prevent the condenser from moving when hitting bumps or anything that will bounce the car. This won't be the reason that people are taking their cars in for service.

Y'all do whatever y'all wanna do, but for me...using what you have laying around the factory to make a part $50+ vehicle isn't ok.
Making repairs and cobbling together working stuff sure, absolutely. I do it all the time, but I would be extremely embarrassed and unhappy with my work if I gave this to a costumer.
 
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Newton

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Long bolts? Instead of a strap? Why?
And you still needed the spreader anyhow, so that design doesn't solve the hodge-podge problem while being more expensive and bringing new points of failure (bolts through a plate don't move as one like a strap would).

-Crissa
The vibrations will wear away at the plastic creating small gaps. When you lose any tension even a minute amount the gaps from the plastic spacer thing wearing will allow the condensor to bounce and move a bit, furthering the issue.

The straps will allow vibrations and bouncing.

A solid bolt will firmly hold the condensor tightly against the firewall. REGARDLESS of the vibrations. And wont lose tension over time, heat cycles, etc.
 

CyberMoose

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This is the 1st time I have seen the thing posted, personally I have no idea how many or why it was done. But what it appears is that this condensor is longer then the previous one so there's more strain and not enough bolts holding it to the firewall. Hopefully it was just a few cars but at the rate they were making then its bound to bea couple thousand.

Its not just a visual change at all. Your car isn't put together with straps for a reason.



Y'all do whatever y'all wanna do, but for me...using what you have laying around the factory to make a part $50+ vehicle isn't ok.
Making repairs and cobbling together working stuff sure, absolutely. I do it all the time, but I would be extremely embarrassed and unhappy with my work if I gave this to a costumer.
I doubt this was something they just found laying around the factory. For the amount of vehicles they have to produce, they probably specifically went out and bought it, which would imply at least some level of planning. I'm sure most people aren't used to seeing this sort of thing since it will never be within sight of 99% of the customers, but i've seen similar things throughout my career. I even worked on a 787 dreamliner where behind the fuel panel seemed like a missing bracket and in it's place was literally just a block of wood that it was screwed into.
 

Newton

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I doubt this was something they just found laying around the factory. For the amount of vehicles they have to produce, they probably specifically went out and bought it, which would imply at least some level of planning. I'm sure most people aren't used to seeing this sort of thing since it will never be within sight of 99% of the customers, but i've seen similar things throughout my career. I even worked on a 787 dreamliner where behind the fuel panel seemed like a missing bracket and in it's place was literally just a block of wood that it was screwed into.
I meant the plastic, or whatever material is used as the buffer between the metal straps and the metal condensor.

And these straps looks very similar the type of thing used for bundling together large pallets of metal, or pipe. In the straps designs defense They are rated more weight and tension then what is most likely going to be applied to the condensor.
 

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Cars have straps in them all over. Straps do compression and vibration very well, so they're used to hold hoses and cables and your design with the long bolts is basically that tho more expensive and less good in a non-vertical orientation.

They obviously needed more compression, and found a quick and cheap and reliable solution. That's good, not bad.

Since they want to make cars cheaply, they'll be working to eliminate this labor-intensive fix, and I bet cars coming out now or in another month will have a different solution. Certainly the ones using the new casting will have a fix.

-Crissa
 

MUSK007

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This article only proves my statement that truck buyers Who spend 60,000 and up on new trucks expect them be perfect. Tesla had better test the heck out of these things before they go into real production and start delivering them. Because Tesla is trying to tap into a market of regular people who buys trucks, not the typical Tesla buyer who will accept any and all defects because ‘’OMG it’s a Tesla’’.

if a Tesla doesn’t get it right, the first time, there will be hell to pay from the negative press and word of mouth for potential truck buyers.
 

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U sound like tesla public relations. Obviously I'm personally not happy with this solution and would rather have a car delivered 2 months later and correct. But to each their own.
 

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No, I sound like someone who has actually had to fix things.

-Crissa
 

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One thing that confuses me is that you are saying that it's okay to use something for a repair but not in production. As somsone that has been fixing things since i was 14 in autoshop and woodshop, repairs are made to last as long as the product they are repairing most the time or usually it will at least be as long as the piece that they are replacing.
 

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