I Think Cybertruck Manufacturing Run Will be Short Lived

Triglide

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This is not based upon any evidence.
  • Most light trucks sold are never modified!
  • The most common modification is a toolbox - something the Cybertruck already has four of.
  • The next most common modification is a roof rack - the Model Y supports these, so there is no reason to think the Cybertruck wouldn't.
  • Lastly, you have tonneau covers. Well, the Cybertruck already has one.
There's nothing about a Cybertruck that makes it difficult to modify. It doesn't have paint, and it has multiple hardpoints and attachment rails. It will be the easiest truck to modify. You can weld or screw into the skin almost anywhere!

The one thing you can't do is flatbed it. Which is probably the most common 'made for customization' thing beyond those, but why would that preclude selling the pickup version? Every other major truck brand manages to sell, and in fact, sell more of the pickup version than the flatbed version, don't they?

I'm not going to buy a truck that doesn't have sides, and I have to customize. Same for most people, I'd guess. Flatbeds have their place, but they're kinda crap for camping or hauling most kinds of boxes.

-Crissa
My first upgrade will most likely be wheels, naturally.
 

Triglide

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The ugly comment aside, to address the "look tough comment". Maybe they (I) they drive them because they need the ground clearance sometimes, the 4x4 capability sometimes, the cargo space sometimes, the cargo capacity in terms of weight sometimes, the interior space sometimes, the towing capacity sometimes, etc...and they don't want to have multiple vehicles to accomplish what they need, when they need it, or rent when needed, or schedule deliveries opposed to picking up whatever it is they need when they need it themselves.

I personally could give two $%!s how tough it looks but it better have a comfortable interior. Full size trucks are the vehicle I can use for everything I need to do.
I must admit that many of my truck upgrades have often been testosterone inspired.
 

strongsafety31

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More to your point, and to add in agreement to what others here are saying, I don't think the Cybertruck makes sense for use as a robotaxi. At least at first, there might only be a few cases where somebody needs the bed space for a robotaxi, and we have to wait and see if FSD will evolve to be able to handle trailers. But I think it makes more sense for somebody that needs to haul or tow things to rent a truck. The Cybertruck will use more energy than the Model 3/Y/S/X and does not make sense for use as a people-hauler because that added energy usage will eat into your profit. The cheaper $25k Tesla that will be made in a handful of years makes more sense for the purpose, and perhaps FSD will be closer to feature-complete by them.
I understand your statement now. I think all types of Tesla vehicles will be needed for robotaxis. Hopefully, Tesla will continue to produce vehicles for the private and commercial sector, but they would definitely make more money producing for the commercial sector. I am not sure Musk is all about money....but I could be wrong.
 

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2 things struck me when I read the article posted below. The thick stainless Steel on the Cybertruck is heavy and it will slow the manufacturing process because of the laser-cutting, bending and welding being much slower than stamping, which can be run at 50+ stamps per minute. Also, it would seem that the lack of curves in the truck is detrimental to reducing the co-efficient of drag. So, once the autonomous driving is implemented, why would Elon keep pushing the constrained resource batteries at a Cybertruck Behemoth that is heavy, slow to manufacture and has a poor airfoil. Maybe the robo-taxi fleet will be made from a lighter stamped SS or aluminum and be shaped more in line of an Aptera. After-all if autonomous driving nearly eliminates accidents, why do we need a tough shell other than for bush driving? Even contractors really only need rust proof, strong bed and good towing chassis. Wish I knew the plan.

https://stampingsimulation.com/forming-stainless-steel-part-2/
Relax, my friend. You make it sound like Cybertruck is going to be a flash in the pan like it's predecessor, the Delorean. They made them for two years, then went bankrupt. They built a futuristic-looking (CT, check) underpowered (CT, uncheck) vehicle that will be remembered forever (CT, check). My dude Elon knows what he's doing. CT isn't that heavy, it's not going to be slow to manufacture, and actually has great drag coefficient. The biggest challenge may be battery constraints, but let the big guy worry about that. He wouldn't be building a Giga Austin if he didn't have a working plan well into the future.
 


Sirfun

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More to your point, and to add in agreement to what others here are saying, I don't think the Cybertruck makes sense for use as a robotaxi. At least at first, there might only be a few cases where somebody needs the bed space for a robotaxi, and we have to wait and see if FSD will evolve to be able to handle trailers. But I think it makes more sense for somebody that needs to haul or tow things to rent a truck. The Cybertruck will use more energy than the Model 3/Y/S/X and does not make sense for use as a people-hauler because that added energy usage will eat into your profit. The cheaper $25k Tesla that will be made in a handful of years makes more sense for the purpose, and perhaps FSD will be closer to feature-complete by them.
You make a good point. However, Waymo is using something similar, Chrysler Pacifica's. https://www.theverge.com/2018/5/31/17412908/waymo-chrysler-pacifica-minvan-self-driving-fleet
 

ScoobyDoo

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The ugly comment aside, to address the "look tough comment". Maybe they (I) they drive them because they need the ground clearance sometimes, the 4x4 capability sometimes, the cargo space sometimes, the cargo capacity in terms of weight sometimes, the interior space sometimes, the towing capacity sometimes, etc...and they don't want to have multiple vehicles to accomplish what they need, when they need it, or rent when needed, or schedule deliveries opposed to picking up whatever it is they need when they need it themselves.

I personally could give two $%!s how tough it looks but it better have a comfortable interior. Full size trucks are the vehicle I can use for everything I need to do.
When I read that post I literally said the same thing in my head. What you said it also the exact reason I drive my truck. Sometimes I'm towing, sometimes I'm hauling, sometimes I'm 'Froding', sometimes I'm camping or going backpacking, sometimes I'm just getting groceries or commuting. My truck gets me to and from work and does everything else.
Also find myself having more "friends" than I remember when people who don't have a truck are moving.....??
 

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The waterjet cutting robots are much cheaper and take less room than the stamping press. So a gang of waterjets can compete with a single mammoth press. The waterjet process may allow to cut a stack of sheets about 6" thick or 50 pieces at a time. 10*50 =500 times. Also such a process is much more reliable because a small problem with the press stops everything, but even a big problem with one jet affects only 1/10 of entire process.
Also count the cutting die maintenance, cost, and wear.
Also the setup time is more time consuming than the process itself. So better automated feeding process would have significant advantage. And there is lots of room for the process acceleration for Tesla.
I guess it was already carefully calculated and no need for alarming.
 
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SEER

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2 things struck me when I read the article posted below. The thick stainless Steel on the Cybertruck is heavy and it will slow the manufacturing process because of the laser-cutting, bending and welding being much slower than stamping, which can be run at 50+ stamps per minute. Also, it would seem that the lack of curves in the truck is detrimental to reducing the co-efficient of drag. So, once the autonomous driving is implemented, why would Elon keep pushing the constrained resource batteries at a Cybertruck Behemoth that is heavy, slow to manufacture and has a poor airfoil. Maybe the robo-taxi fleet will be made from a lighter stamped SS or aluminum and be shaped more in line of an Aptera. After-all if autonomous driving nearly eliminates accidents, why do we need a tough shell other than for bush driving? Even contractors really only need rust proof, strong bed and good towing chassis. Wish I knew the plan.

https://stampingsimulation.com/forming-stainless-steel-part-2/
Lighter SS? EXOSKELETON? hmmm...
 
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Sonnus

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I think is is unlikely that Tesla will use laser cutting, as the author states, on the mass produced truck. Laser cutting is a good idea for a one-off product but I doubt Tesla will do this for production.

It is much more likely Tesla will use a stamp press to stamp out the shapes of the panels. Building stamp press dies for just a prototype vehicle would have been wasteful.
 

Crissa

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It is much more likely Tesla will use a stamp press to stamp out the shapes of the panels. Building stamp press dies for just a prototype vehicle would have been wasteful.
While some pieces may be stamped, the idea was to make may of the body panels from scored and folded pieces - which for large pieces of steel is simpler to do.

Fewer moves and aligns means more automation and shorter production lines.

-Crissa
 

Sonnus

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While some pieces may be stamped, the idea was to make may of the body panels from scored and folded pieces - which for large pieces of steel is simpler to do.

Fewer moves and aligns means more automation and shorter production lines.

-Crissa
I am just saying the outer "silhouette" can be stamped using a cutting die, no forming or shaping would be needed. The general shape of the flat panel can be stamped out of the sheet instead of being laser cut. This would be much faster and economical compared to the laser.
 

Crissa

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It doesn't need to be laser cut, either, there are lots of cutting methods. For instance, a score cut uses less energy.

Cutting 3mm hardened steel with a stamp seems unlikely.

-Crissa
Sponsored

 
 




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