firsttruck

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What Dennis is saying is they didn't hot test, they didn't cast. And he's right, they didn't hot test the press in Italy.
Hmm, you can't really test without the Cybertruck chassis molds/dies but it might be possible to do some significant tests using the Cybertruck chassis molds/dies without having a IRDA Gigapress.

The IRDA Gigpress's job is to reliable, accurately, rapidly, forcefully(9 tons) open/close clamping of the huge molds many multipe times a minute.

It might be possible that the makers of the huge Cybertruck chassis molds could have tested the molds without having a IRDA Gigpress.

The mold makers would need a aluminum melting system, aluminum injection system, cooling system and just use a manually assembled static rigging structure of 9-tons clamping pressure to keep the 2 molds/die halfs closed during a test. The mold makers do not need to make a finished part every 2 seconds. They could take hours or days to setup (assembly/dis-assemble) for an individual test while the test itself only lasts less than a second.
 
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greggertruck

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Hmm, you can't really test without the Cybertruck chassis molds but it might be possible to do some tests using the Cybertruck chassis molds without having a IRDA Gigapress.

The IRDA Gigpress's job is to reliable, accurately, rapidly, forcefully(9 tons) open/close clamping of the huge molds many multipe times a minute.

It might be possible that the makers of the huge Cybertruck chassis molds could have tested the molds without having a IRDA Gigpress.

The mold makers would need a aluminum melting system, aluminum injection system, cooling system and just use a manually assembled static rigging structure of 9-tons clamping pressure to keep the 2 molds/die halfs closed during a test. The mold makers do not need to make a finished part every 2 seconds. They could take hours or days to setup (assembly/dis-assemble) for an individual test while the test itself only lasts less than a second.
Would love to get up close and personal with a press and someone with a gigantic brain that can mansplain it to me.
 

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Hmm, you can't really test without the Cybertruck chassis molds but it might be possible to do some tests using the Cybertruck chassis molds without having a IRDA Gigapress.

The IRDA Gigpress's job is to reliable, accurately, rapidly, forcefully(9 tons) open/close clamping of the huge molds many multipe times a minute.

It might be possible that the makers of the huge Cybertruck chassis molds could have tested the molds without having a IRDA Gigpress.

The mold makes would need a aluminum melting system, aluminum injection system, cooling system and just use a manually assembled static rigging structure of 9-tons clamping pressure to keep the molds closed during a test. The mold makers do not need to make a finished part every 2 seconds. They could take hours or days to setup (assembly/dis-assemble) for an individual test while the test itself only lasts less than a second.
I think we’re all splitting hairs a bit here.

From what I understand nobody has actually tested the injection process on the 9k Ton Gigapress; IDRA does not have the forge/ injection equipment on site.

Not suggesting this is a huge deal, just that it’s possible (likely even) there are details which will need to be handled. How much coolant, how much lube, etc. There might even be changes to the alumuinum they use.

If you’ve ever done any big project with lots of moving parts that “Should Work Together”, I think you have an idea where I’m coming from.
 


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The 9,000 ton clamping force of the gigapress could surely have been tested. The molten aluminum injection piece was most likely not tested in the actual gigapress. It COULD have been tested, as others have said, by clamping the two halves of the molds together and then pouring in some kind of metal that would stay molten long enough to flow through the mold. The trick with the gigapress is that it has to hold together so hard because Tesla will be spraying the aluminum in there so fast to keep it from setting up before it's all the way in there.

I wonder how long it'll take to cool each casting before it can hit the line.
 
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greggertruck

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The 9,000 ton clamping force of the gigapress could surely have been tested. The molten aluminum injection piece was most likely not tested in the actual gigapress. It COULD have been tested, as others have said, by clamping the two halves of the molds together and then pouring in some kind of metal that would stay molten long enough to flow through the mold. The trick with the gigapress is that it has to hold together so hard because Tesla will be spraying the aluminum in there so fast to keep it from setting up before it's all the way in there.

I wonder how long it'll take to cool each casting before it can hit the line.
Less than 3 days. We had a Jesus happen last time something cooled off that long. WILD.

badumts.
 

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I wonder how long it'll take to cool each casting before it can hit the line.
I don’t think they feed fresh castings to the assembly line. At least, the constant presence of castings around the plant makes me think they keep a constant inventory of them. Not sure if that’s a requirement or just what they do to insulate production from GP downtime.
 


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Could you imagine if they used two rear plaid motor assemblies from model s for the front and rear of the Plaid Cybertruck. I think a 0-60 in the 2.2 range is prob possible for this giant truck. Would be so dope!
I think the Plaid motors they will use on the QM CT will be a bit smaller. But the 0-60 time will be limited by the tyres you use, not the power output of the drivetrain, even 2.9s is pushing it with all terrain tyres.
 
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greggertruck

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I think the Plaid motors they will use on the QM CT will be a bit smaller. But the 0-60 time will be limited by the tyres you use, not the power output of the drivetrain, even 2.9s is pushing it with all terrain tyres.
My FIL thinks his 4.0 second 0-60 is fast in his Lightning. I am SO happy he got HIS truck and he ISN'T rubbing it in my face right now, but damn it's hard not to be like "doggggg... you got jipped". It's freaking beautiful but 100k and NO heated steering wheel even? odd. But dang nice! Serves a demographic for sure.
 

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I don’t think they feed fresh castings to the assembly line. At least, the constant presence of castings around the plant makes me think they keep a constant inventory of them. Not sure if that’s a requirement or just what they do to insulate production from GP downtime.
I propose they put them outside so they don't heat up the building. Plus, putting a hot part on the assembly line would be less than ideal.
 

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I propose they put them outside so they don't heat up the building. Plus, putting a hot part on the assembly line would be less than ideal.
How long do you think an aluminum part stays hot? I propose they put them outside because they don't want to store them inside and it has nothing to do with temperature of the casts....
 

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I propose they put them outside so they don't heat up the building. Plus, putting a hot part on the assembly line would be less than ideal.
How long do you think an aluminum part stays hot? I propose they put them outside because they don't want to store them inside and it has nothing to do with temperature of the casts....
I think Dids has the right of it here. These castings all appeared at the same time as if they were moved outside in bulk rather than piecemeal for cooling. Most of these castings were likely inside for quite some time and likely cooled off long before they were moved outside. For example when they did CyberRodeo they had a bunch inside the building and none outside.

They move them in and out as space is required.

 

 
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