Ehninger1212

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There are parking spots made for bicycles and motorcycles, too, as well as compact spots you won't be able to use.

This isn't news.

You'll be able to charge. They're increasing the number of stations by like a third year over year. Stations will show up that fit the Cybertruck. Or towing. Or other brands!

-Crissa
But thats different, It seems that most supercharger stations are a uniform design, in my area anyways. So if Im traveling in need of charge and I pull up and I cant fit in one stall.. then I more than likely cant fit in any...

As I said.. I could be overthinking this and its really a non issue.

Also... I have yet to see a bicycle supercharger stall...
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Ehninger1212

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You mean, this image? Showing the "stretched" cable?

dd61bei-jpg.jpg



It is not stretched at all, this is just an illusion of perspective. The video seconds later clearly shows the SC cable dangling freely with plenty of slack.

screenshot-2023-09-08-at-11-12-57-am-png.png


This admittedly leaves little room, but that's true of all Teslas at SuperChargers.
Yes.. this is exactly what im talking about.
 

Crissa

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So if Im traveling in need of charge and I pull up and I cant fit in one stall.. then I more than likely cant fit in any...

As I said.. I could be overthinking this and its really a non issue.
The thing is, the only people with Cybertrucks today are those testing it.

So if you were traveling, you wouldn't be driving a Cybertruck, so the stations don't have to be ready for them yet.

-Crissa
 

TyPope

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I totally agree with you. I think Tesla is going to learn the hard way when so many Cybertrucks back up into the SC. Until pull thru SCs are more common, backing up/unhooking the trailer, is going to be a pain in the butt.
Counterpoint:
Most of the truck owners I know always, always, always back into spots. This is especially true when there isn't much of an aisle. A 22' long truck can't even start turning until it's completely out of the spot if you are backing out. If you are pulling forward, you can start your turn before you clear the spot.

It's a LOT easier to back into spots than to back out of them. At least it is with a truck. I used to pull straight into parking spots until once, someone parked a bit close to me. I almost never got out of that spot and I'm good at backing. A friend asked why I didn't just back into spots so I could get out easier. Viola! I always back in unless I can pull through a straight spot.

TLDR: Backing in is much easier with longer vehicles.
 

rudedawg78

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Counterpoint:
Most of the truck owners I know always, always, always back into spots. This is especially true when there isn't much of an aisle. A 22' long truck can't even start turning until it's completely out of the spot if you are backing out. If you are pulling forward, you can start your turn before you clear the spot.

It's a LOT easier to back into spots than to back out of them. At least it is with a truck. I used to pull straight into parking spots until once, someone parked a bit close to me. I almost never got out of that spot and I'm good at backing. A friend asked why I didn't just back into spots so I could get out easier. Viola! I always back in unless I can pull through a straight spot.

TLDR: Backing in is much easier with longer vehicles.
I completely understand your point. I have a tendency to back into parking spaces all the time, whether in a truck or not. It is the emergency responder in me that probably created that habit. I want to be able to get going quickly if need be.

I just wish the SC cables were just a bit longer to help prevent the likely future of CTs backing up too much and hitting a SC.
 


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I wonder why Tesla doesn't simply angle the charge ports toward the rear of the vehicles. The placement could remain the same. It would fless the cables a little less than requiring the 90 degree turn they do now.
 

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I wonder why Tesla doesn't simply angle the charge ports toward the rear of the vehicles. The placement could remain the same. It would fless the cables a little less than requiring the 90 degree turn they do now.
Angled slots take up more space. You fit three perpendicular spots in the space of two angled slots, or whatever. It varies.

They generally match up their spaces to the parking lots they're in.

-Crissa
 

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TLDR: Backing in is much easier with longer vehicles.
It's not about the length, its about which end has the steerable wheels. On the Cybertruck, it's both ends
 

wtibbit

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Counterpoint:
Most of the truck owners I know always, always, always back into spots. This is especially true when there isn't much of an aisle. A 22' long truck can't even start turning until it's completely out of the spot if you are backing out. If you are pulling forward, you can start your turn before you clear the spot.

It's a LOT easier to back into spots than to back out of them. At least it is with a truck. I used to pull straight into parking spots until once, someone parked a bit close to me. I almost never got out of that spot and I'm good at backing. A friend asked why I didn't just back into spots so I could get out easier. Viola! I always back in unless I can pull through a straight spot.

TLDR: Backing in is much easier with longer vehicles.
****Edited after actually counting how trucks parked at Costco (see below) ****

You are certainly be right about backing into spots being an easier maneuver, especially with a 22' long vehicle.

Years ago when I learned to drive a forklift I was surprised by how easy it was to maneuver in tight spots with its rear wheel steering. Yet, out of habit I suppose, I only park my 18' long truck nose out when I'm loading or unload my music gear - a Hammond organ, stage piano and the big amps that go with them - from the back.

But, I live in the DFW area, where the trucks-to-cars ratio may be higher than any other major metropolis; nearly all the trucks I see parked in the lots here are nose-in. (You must not know these truck owners ;).)

I think these owners may be nose-in types because a LOT of people in urban/suburban areas buy posh crew cab pickups in lieu of a sedan or SUV and then proceed to drive them, and park them, like a luxury sedan or SUV.

EDIT: I make a Costco ru no s a n d checked how pickups were parked. About 2/3 of them were parked nose-in.
 
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It's not about the length, its about which end has the steerable wheels. On the Cybertruck, it's both ends
Well, you are correct, sir.
 

TyPope

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You are certainly be right about backing into spots being an easier maneuver, especially with a 22' long vehicle.

Years ago when I learned to drive a forklift I was surprised by how easy it was to maneuver in tight spots with its rear wheel steering. Yet, out of habit I suppose, I only park my 18' long truck nose out when I'm loading or unload my music gear - a Hammond organ, stage piano and the big amps that go with them - from the back.

But, I live in the DFW area, where the trucks-to-cars ratio may be higher than any other major metropolis; nearly all the trucks I see parked in the lots here are nose-in. (You must not know these truck owners ;).)

I think these owners may be nose-in types because a LOT of people in urban/suburban areas buy posh crew cab pickups in lieu of a sedan or SUV and then proceed to drive them, and park them, like a luxury sedan or SUV.

Hmmm.... I have to make a Costco run today. Maybe I'll do a trucks-nose-out-vs-nose-in inspection. :unsure:
That'd be interesting. I wonder how much of that is determined by parkinglot aisle and spot-width measurements. I can assure you that EVERY single truck parked in the row I park in at work here is backed in. Every single one. Now, to be fair, as I walk to the building, I pass a single truck that is nosed into a spot. It's a Ford Maverick. They don't turn terribly sharp but they are much smaller trucks.
 

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That'd be interesting. I wonder how much of that is determined by parkinglot aisle and spot-width measurements. I can assure you that EVERY single truck parked in the row I park in at work here is backed in. Every single one. Now, to be fair, as I walk to the building, I pass a single truck that is nosed into a spot. It's a Ford Maverick. They don't turn terribly sharp but they are much smaller trucks.
I made a Costco run today and counted every pickup in the lot and which way it was parked. That gave me something to do while my wife shopped...

First of all, I was surprised that there were only 33 pickups were parked in the lot. Maybe I should have checked the lot at Boot Town or Tractor Supply.

Regarding the Costco parking lot aisle and parking space widths, both are generously wide compared to most other lots in my area. Nearly all the spaces in that lot are set up such that, if the adjoining space is empty, you can drive straight across to that adjoining space and be parked nose-out.

Here is my short survey result: Of the 33 pickups parked in the lot, 12 were backed into their parking spaces and 21 were nosed in.

I can think of one reason why a work parking lot may have a preponderance of vehicles backed into their parking places.... A person may be in less of a hurry to get to their workplace than to get home; taking more time to back into a space at the beginning of the work day would allow that person to spend less time getting out of the space at the end of the work day.
 

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I made a Costco run today and counted every pickup in the lot and which way it was parked. That gave me something to do while my wife shopped...

First of all, I was surprised that there were only 33 pickups were parked in the lot. Maybe I should have checked the lot at Boot Town or Tractor Supply.

Regarding the Costco parking lot aisle and parking space widths, both are generously wide compared to most other lots in my area. Nearly all the spaces in that lot are set up such that, if the adjoining space is empty, you can drive straight across to that adjoining space and be parked nose-out.

Here is my short survey result: Of the 33 pickups parked in the lot, 12 were backed into their parking spaces and 21 were nosed in.

I can think of one reason why a work parking lot may have a preponderance of vehicles backed into their parking places.... A person may be in less of a hurry to get to their workplace than to get home; taking more time to back into a space at the beginning of the work day would allow that person to spend less time getting out of the space at the end of the work day.
Interesting. I can tell you it's loads easier to back in and also pull straight out in crowded or tight lots.
 

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Interesting. I can tell you it's loads easier to back in and also pull straight out in crowded or tight lots.
That's the beauty of Costco, I have yet to see one that is really tight. Or even has a spot marked "compact". Knowing their customer has just purchased $500 in two carts, all the lots I've seen have pretty generous stalls and lanes.
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