datechboss101

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My family and I may fly or take a rental to the factory and drive back with the CT.
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Diehard

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We always take the EV (Model 3 LR Dual). It’s more fun, and we do pass a lot of superchargers too. You can choose which ones you stop at. Plus it’s not uncommon that we only stop for 10 mins for a stretch and short fast charge either. As has been said, destination chargers or other charging options at sights can be chosen when bored of all superchargers locations. Abetterrouteplanner is awesome for the shortest most efficient charging stops on a long route.
It is so cool that Abetterrouteplanner has CT in there Already. I did a 531 mile, (9 hr driving) trip on it with 3 stops for 56 additional minutes charge time (7min + 19min + 31min) with CT2. Totally acceptable if it is like that in real life. It looks like it didn’t add correctly but close enough.
 
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Luke42

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Can we buy our CT in Canada and pick it up at Austin?
BMW has/had the European Delivery program, which means that most of the issues you'd encounter have been solved. (Different companies, different nations, but all Western Nations with mostly-compatible legal systems.)

BMW is winding down the European Delivery program:
https://www.roadandtrack.com/new-cars/a32388068/bmw-european-delivery-program-ending/
But it's for business reasons, not legal reasons. The pandemic probably hasn't been doing this any favors, either.

Anyway, I'm just pointing out that there's (imperfect) precedent for this kind of thing.
 
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Tim.Luchenko

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But in the end, you won't.

The single or dual might be able to charge overnight. The tri won't.

The difference is artificial. If you have the single or dual, you'll aim for those faster chargers instead of skipping them in the path. You'll grab a few ks when eat, if you need to make a longer hop. And more V3 chargers will be released by the time you have the truck. So it will be rare that the longer range truck will get to optimize the charging over the other truck.

And without that difference between v2 and v3 chargers, the trucks charge the same. The tri doesn't charge faster, for the most part, just longer.

-Crissa
When I drive from LA to SF I usually have a non-stop drive for 6-7 hours, depends on traffic. If I have 100% charge on Tri motor it should be enough to cover 400 mi with no stops and don't drain battery below 5%.

And without that difference between v2 and v3 chargers, the trucks charge the same. The tri doesn't charge faster, for the most part, just longer.
-Crissa
Do not wanna dig into the debris, but you are not right, It does charge faster!
"Batteries are nonlinear devices and most chemistry accepts a fast charge from empty up to about 50% state-of-charge (SoC) with little losses. NiCd does best and suffers the least amount of strain. Stresses occur in the second half of the charge cycle towards top charge when acceptance of lithium ions in the anode of Li-ion becomes labored. An analogy is irate drivers fighting for the last parking spot in a shopping mall to catch a sale special.
Applying an ultra-fast charge when the battery is empty and then tapering off the current when reaching 50% SoC and higher is called step charging. "
 

Crissa

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When I drive from LA to SF I usually have a non-stop drive for 6-7 hours, depends on traffic. If I have 100% charge on Tri motor it should be enough to cover 400 mi with no stops and don't drain battery below 5%.
That's not how range works.

That's also not a 'road trip'. That's driving non-stop.

And yes, a larger battery can charge at the peak longer than a smaller battery. But in most cases, this will not matter.

-Crissa
 

WFrazier

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I want to pick up just to make a party over it. Though I might have to fly down from Utah to get it.
 

Sirfun

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Sirfun

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That's just one hop. I don't see what it has to do with charging?

-Crissa
Maybe I read things wrong. But what I thought I read was, Tim said he wanted to drive a 500 mile range Tri motor, 400 miles without stopping. Which I read as not stopping to charge.
Then you said, that's not how range works. Which I read as a 500 mile CT wouldn't be able to drive 400 miles without stopping to charge.
That article is an interesting read. Especially the part where he talked about hitting the Grapevine with 30% and still making it. And comparing that to the EV1 question.
 

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Maybe I read things wrong. But what I thought I read was, Tim said he wanted to drive a 500 mile range Tri motor, 400 miles without stopping. Which I read as not stopping to charge.
Then you said, that's not how range works. Which I read as a 500 mile CT wouldn't be able to drive 400 miles without stopping to charge.
That article is an interesting read. Especially the part where he talked about hitting the Grapevine with 30% and still making it. And comparing that to the EV1 question.
You read absolutely correct! That's how I plan to use my CT3. Therefore I ordered CT3 just because do not wanna spend even a single minute on Supercharger on my way home from LA.
 

Crissa

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Maybe I read things wrong. But what I thought I read was, Tim said he wanted to drive a 500 mile range Tri motor, 400 miles without stopping. Which I read as not stopping to charge.
Then you said, that's not how range works. Which I read as a 500 mile CT wouldn't be able to drive 400 miles without stopping to charge.
That article is an interesting read. Especially the part where he talked about hitting the Grapevine with 30% and still making it. And comparing that to the EV1 question.
Oh. Yeah. Because reported range is for a standard mix of driving, not bombing down a single highway.

A Model 3 goes about 75% of its EPA range at 70mph. The Cybertruck will not do so well. You will probably get 65 to 70%. Or 350 or 500 miles range.

Of course, you'll be saving lots of energy in stop and go LA traffic unlike a gas burner... But you'll be burning the electrons on the Grapevine like no one's business.

-Crissa
 

Sirfun

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Oh. Yeah. Because reported range is for a standard mix of driving, not bombing down a single highway.

A Model 3 goes about 75% of its EPA range at 70mph. The Cybertruck will not do so well. You will probably get 65 to 70%. Or 350 or 500 miles range.

Of course, you'll be saving lots of energy in stop and go LA traffic unlike a gas burner... But you'll be burning the electrons on the Grapevine like no one's business.

-Crissa
Whoa, if people end up with only 350 miles of range driving a "500" mile range CT, driving on the highway at 70mph. It could cause some real problems. I saw this chart awhile back and it seems like the worst estimates of range always come with larger tires than the standard size. But I don't see problems like you are talking about at 70mph. 80mph makes a huge difference though.
https://teslike.com/
 

Crissa

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Whoa, if people end up with only 350 miles of range driving a "500" mile range CT, driving on the highway at 70mph. It could cause some real problems.
That's how range works, though. Air resistance increases at a square of speed.

The Model 3 is nearly a third more aerodynamic than a Cybertruck. And it has a bigger battery (currently) than advertised. Tesla can't change the EPA formula.

-Crissa
 
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