ajdelange

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There are lots of after market Tesla modifiers and repair companies already.
Boy, there sure are. I was surprised at how many I found with a quick search for Tesla Repair Northern Virginia. Here's a quote from the one i liked best

"Halls Corner Automotive at 7320 Gambrill Rd was recently discovered under Tesla Model X manual transmission repair."



In 10 years they will be even more common and there will be a lot of donor trucks for scrap parts.
Yes, one may be able to keep an old Tesla going with parts from the junk yard parts but that's not the question the guy asked. He wanted to know how much a rebuilt motor will cost. The answer is there won't be any rebuilt motors except ones rebuilt by Tesla and I doubt they will offer the service. For starters the rotor winding machine is doubtless patented and will not be available to anyone besides Tesla.


It's likely the same motors will be used on other Teslas, or they will be able to use one from a newer model.
You haven't taken note of how quickly Tesla changes motor designs in its cars, have you?





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Ogre

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Yes, one may be able to keep an old Tesla going with parts from the junk yard parts but that's not the question the guy asked. He wanted to know how much a rebuilt motor will cost. The answer is there won't be any rebuilt motors except ones rebuilt by Tesla and I doubt they will offer the service. For starters the rotor winding machine is doubtless patented and will not be available to anyone besides Tesla.
What I'm saying is if your Cybertruck motor fails in 30 years, repairing the car isn't going to involve a rebuilt motor. It's either going to be a newly wound motor or a scrapyard one. Rebuilt won't be a thing for electric motors.

You haven't taken note of how quickly Tesla changes motor designs in its cars, have you?
They change motor designs, but not the way they mount them. The motors between the M3 and MY have compatible mounts and gearing interfaces. When Tesla switched their AC induction motors to permanent magnet motors, the mount and much of the wiring was the same. It's entirely likely that the motors in the Cybertruck will be replaceable with one from another vehicle even one made multiple years later.

They design it this way so they can change motors out when the technology advances without having to change the rest of the drivetrain. Also, so they can share components between vehicles.
 

Throwcomputer

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What I'm saying is if your Cybertruck motor fails in 30 years, repairing the car isn't going to involve a rebuilt motor. It's either going to be a newly wound motor or a scrapyard one. Rebuilt won't be a thing for electric motors.


They change motor designs, but not the way they mount them. The motors between the M3 and MY have compatible mounts and gearing interfaces. When Tesla switched their AC induction motors to permanent magnet motors, the mount and much of the wiring was the same. It's entirely likely that the motors in the Cybertruck will be replaceable with one from another vehicle even one made multiple years later.

They design it this way so they can change motors out when the technology advances without having to change the rest of the drivetrain. Also, so they can share components between vehicles.
I look forward to retaining the patina on my v1 ct 30 years from now when it's a collectible, while being able to upgraded everything underneath that patina with modern ranges and driving tech. It's only original steel once!
 

FutureBoy

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I would be curious to learn how the CT will bring in outside air. Most cars/trucks have an intake right above the hood by the windshield but the CT seems to not have one there.
Actually, this is a really good question. Some ICE vehicles built for offroading even have a snorkel to keep water out of the engine air intake. Now since we don't have the need for an engine air intake the snorkel isn't really a problem. But if I'm going to be using this vehicle offroad, fording rivers, etc, I'm going to wonder about where the cabin air is coming in from. And I don't think it would be good to get the biodefense air filter wet.

If Elon is tweeting about the vehicle floating then I'm guessing they actually did a test in water. So hopefully they are addressing water getting into everywhere and what the consequences of that would be.

But you do have an interesting observation about the cabin air intake. Now, since this isn't an ICE vehicle with exhaust to deal with, there are other locations that court be used for the air intake. Like from the roof above the truck bed. Or from "out back" where an ICE vehicle would have an exhaust pipe. Neither of those sounds practical or very useful to me. But where I'm headed is that the intake could be practically anywhere. Now we gotta go find it. Maybe we can see somewhere in the various pictures of the prototype. Those pictures have been pretty well scrutinized but if one was just busy looking for some other feature perhaps the air intake would have been missed.

Speaking of keeping water out of the air intake though, what about the rolled coal of a big ICE truck. Do the biodefense filters effectively eliminate the stink of those trucks? Or could a temporary valve get shut to keep out their detritus when they go by? As much as the filter will probably remove all the sooty residues, those same materials will also foul the filter at some point. And how much is it to replace the filter? And how difficult to do myself?
 

ajdelange

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What I'm saying is if your Cybertruck motor fails in 30 years, repairing the car isn't going to involve a rebuilt motor. It's either going to be a newly wound motor or a scrapyard one. Rebuilt won't be a thing for electric motors.
No it won't because Tesla will be the only ones that can rebuild them and they won't (IMO). BTW IMO a rewound motor is a rebuilt one.


They change motor designs, but not the way they mount them.
So anything with the same hole pattern will do?


When Tesla switched their AC induction motors to permanent magnet motors, the mount and much of the wiring was the same.
So all you would have to do is pop in an IM to replace a PMSRM? No. Of course not. What you are overlooking is that IM and PMSRM are entirely different motors that work on entirely different principle and require entirely different control algorithms. This means that while the inverters may have some common parts the firmware is substantially different.


It's entirely likely that the motors in the Cybertruck will be replaceable with one from another vehicle even one made multiple years later.
Very unlikely.


They design it this way so they can change motors out when the technology advances without having to change the rest of the drivetrain. Also, so they can share components between vehicles.
The obvious counter example is that the CRIMS will spin at 20,000 rpm and all previous motors turn substantially slower than that. To backfit a CRIM would requires a different gearing ratio.
 
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ajdelange

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Yes, very much like this.
You understand that the car's throttle management and regen control software would have to be replaced to allow this? IOW it would be possible but it is not something that I think Tesla would take the trouble to develop.
 

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I throw a lot of stuff in my truck bed and stuff happens. Bags of concrete break, if you load up mulch, it gets everywhere. I wouldn't want seals on the gate because I know they would get torn up. Almost every time I wash my truck I have to sweep out the bed and there is a surprising amount of debris. If I took a picture of my truck bed right now you would laugh. my neighbor was moving out and I knew they were struggling to get the trash out so I told them to just throw any trash in my truck and I would take it and dump it. Its piled 5' high with junk.

Ideally, when the gate is down there will be a gap to allow debris to be swept onto the ground and it wont get trapped in any hinges or covers. Even if they try to put some kind of cover to span the joint between the bed and the truck when the gate is down that cover is going to get all sorts of junk in it. The bed needs to be designed crazy simple to get debris out simply and quickly.
In 100% agreement with everything stated here.
 

Crissa

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Rebuilt won't be a thing for electric motors.
Generally it's call re-winding or commissioning. You really can rebuild electric motors!

You make sure the coils are aligned properly - sometimes that's just the encoder wheel. Sometimes the lubricaating slides need to be replaced. Most modern motors don't have bushings, but that's a thing, too. Permanent magnets need to be aligned and sometimes they need replacing (they do wear out!). The windings themselves slowly push themselves apart, the magnets heat up and their crystals re-align.

But yes, scrap or replacement will often be cheaper, depending upon what needs to be done. Especially with specially made rotors ^-^

-Crissa
 

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