Right to repair; Sustainable prioritisation

JBee

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A CyberTruck is just another motor vehicle. Individuals and repair shops have been repairing motor vehicles as long as there have been motor vehicles. Whether Tom Cruise can or would attempt to repair his jet really isn't particularly germane, in this forum. Right to repair does apply to the military (I would bet that it is written it into most every procurement contract); but, again, it really isn't germane in this forum.
Furthermore, you appear not to understand that RtR applies not only to individual owners, but to repair shops, as well. As someone who has owned a third party service business for 35 years, manufacturers trying to restrict parts and knowledge is something that I have dealt with for many years.
Sorry could of sworn I posted a response here already.

Anyways, my arguement still isn't against the right to repair, rather that those that wish to repair have the capability to repair. Hence the military and Tom Cruise comments as comparison.

Military and airlines operate with highly trained and skilled technicians and engineers unlike most private persons, so they are essentially immune to RtR anyway, seeing the manufacturer dictates repairs and maintenance otherwise the FAA would not let them fly at all.

As for repair shops or DIY FIAT retailers, having a business licence or company registration doesn't make you capable of repairs either.

*(FIAT - Fix It Again Tony)

As for manufacturers trying to restrict information, patents have been around for ages and are the bane of modern progress in my opinion as every potential improvement becomes commercially arduous.

But that still doesn't justify unqualified work on machines that can pose a public safety risk.

Its hard to hear sometimes, but the only constant in the galaxy is change, you can either be the architect of change or the victim of change. As is the case with corporate farming, soon repairs will also be dominated by corporate repair chains that will push out individual small service businesses. In the case of car repair shops they will likely mostly disappear with the ICE age and go the way of the Dodo.

Is that good or what I want? No. But it is a opportunity to change and do things better.

 

SparkChaser

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Sorry could of sworn I posted a response here already.

Anyways, my arguement still isn't against the right to repair, rather that those that wish to repair have the capability to repair. Hence the military and Tom Cruise comments as comparison.

Military and airlines operate with highly trained and skilled technicians and engineers unlike most private persons, so they are essentially immune to RtR anyway, seeing the manufacturer dictates repairs and maintenance otherwise the FAA would not let them fly at all.
My response.
Not at all how it works. The industry is capable of coming up with their own repairs and have licenses to do that. The military assumes all responsibility for operating outside the envelope and in adverse conditions. This is what makes them different than a commercial property. Designated Repair stations have large authority to alter or manufacture their own fixes and variations, improvements and they often market these FAA approved alterations.


As for repair shops or DIY FIAT retailers, having a business licence or company registration doesn't make you capable of repairs either.

*(FIAT - Fix It Again Tony)

As for manufacturers trying to restrict information, patents have been around for ages and are the bane of modern progress in my opinion as every potential improvement becomes commercially arduous.

But that still doesn't justify unqualified work on machines that can pose a public safety risk.

Its hard to hear sometimes, but the only constant in the galaxy is change, you can either be the architect of change or the victim of change. As is the case with corporate farming, soon repairs will also be dominated by corporate repair chains that will push out individual small service businesses. In the case of car repair shops they will likely mostly disappear with the ICE age and go the way of the Dodo.

Is that good or what I want? No. But it is a opportunity to change and do things better.
Altering a commercially created product often voids any warranty and responsibility of the manufacture. If you want to cut your CT in half and put it back together, you can't fault Tesla for it not working. Right to repair can make sense on many things but the more complex the product the less likely you are to have the tools knowledge or ability to actually repair it.
 

 
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