Size of garage for my Cybertruck

ajdelange

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No doubt that energy that goes into splattering a raindrop into a thin film is more than the energy required to do that to the same volume of air so no question that rain adds even more drag but I was thinking of the energy used to push even a thin film of water on the road surface out of the way. Power consumption is noticeably higher on a wet road surface than a dry one.

Higher humidity, OTOH, is an advantage (unless you are those hapless pilots at SFO) as it renders air less dense thus reducing drag (and as those poor blokes discovered, lift).





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Sirfun

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No doubt that energy that goes into splattering a raindrop into a thin film is more than the energy required to do that to the same volume of air so no question that rain adds even more drag but I was thinking of the energy used to push even a thin film of water on the road surface out of the way. Power consumption is noticeably higher on a wet road surface than a dry one.

Higher humidity, OTOH, is an advantage (unless you are those hapless pilots at SFO) as it renders air less dense thus reducing drag (and as those poor blokes discovered, lift).
Dang there goes that excuse for not hitting as far. Actually, thanks I learned something. I always thought wrongly, that humidity meant more density.
 

TyPope

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From Aron in Saskatchewan, in a thread on this site specifically asking about the Cybertruck in cold conditions: "All electric cars lose range with temperature but so do ICE cars. It is only temporary and will be better again when warm. Battery size and charge speed is the best way to overcome this issue. The bigger the battery the more capacity it has to run the thermal management and warm the batteries which lets you go further in the cold. Faster charging let’s you get back on the road faster and not cool down to much. Right now you will loose 1/4 to 1/3 range around -20C. The colder batteries are only one aspect of this reduced range. The denser air has a lot to do with it. My current ICE vehicle goes between 500-600km on a tank depending on wind in the summer. In the winter I get between 400-450km per tank. So an ICE vehicle loses 1/4-1/3 range in winter too. Drag coefficient and efficiency of electric are better than ICE cars so that helps. You can change your heating in an EV and get more range. I have a heated hoodie that I will use to help me get more range by reducing the heat output if I need. Can’t do that in an ICE vehicle."
Coming from Minot, ND, I can tell you that you not only lose range in the really cold weather, you also lose time. Nothing sucks worse than trying to use a snow thrower when there's a vehicle in the driveway. It is SO much faster removing snow when the driveway is clear. Not to mention getting the snow off the vehicle so you can drive. Yes, the CT is heated but you still have to clear the snow off of it so you don't go down the road shedding huge ice sheets. Yeah, inside parking is VERY nice in really cold weather.
 

Roslyn

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I have been looking at either expanding my garage wider and longer or possibly getting a new house. Most of my life I have parked my trucks outside and plugged in when needed. I just wanted to be a little nicer to this truck if I could and also maybe give the battery warmers a rest sometimes. Sounds like I don’t need to worry about that. It’s funny most of the Tesla’s I have rent have been kept in a garage so having one just sitting out front seemed odd. Thanks for the input and I guess I have some measuring to do. 😁
'If you've got it, flaunt it !'
 

drscot

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What do you need a garage for ? Are you worried about rust ? Are you worried about hooligans damaging it ? That maybe your tush might not be warm enough ? What Are You Worried About ? Check out the videos of the Cybertruck driving in Alaska (yes), Norway, etc. As long as you have reasonable access to electricity, you should be just fine in cold weather. Just do the research. Several S3s in nearest small city (pop. ca. 70,000, w/chargers), and nothing but good reports. (This is from a little old lady (5'2", 70 yo) who's tired of nonsense vehicles, and looking forward to a vehicle to keep up with my northern British Columbia lifestyle.)
Maybe he is like me. I have the same question. I happen to like to keep my vehicles garaged. I take it you don't have turkey vultures and condors flying around launching shit bombs on everything below? We do. We used to have pterodactyls too until I shot the last one. It fell out of the sky into the neighbor's yard and they never forgave me. Another point, is that insurance is less for garaged vehicles, so yes, how big of a garage do I need is a legitimate question. Leave your CT out if you wish. Here windstorms knock down trees as well. Doubt your CT will be impervious to a downed tree, especially a big one. If my garage is too small, I'll just remember back in my Boy Scout days as a Tender Foot. They'd send us around to other campsites looking for bacon stretchers and left-handed smoke shifters, right before we'd get ready for the snipe hunt, so I'll be prepared. I'll just find me a good old fashioned garage stretcher.
I imagine like everything else, there will be a good, better, and a best. Makes sense. Unimotor-good. Dual motor-better. Trimotor-best. Makes perfect sense to me! But here, garaging your CT makes perfect sense from both a monetary (insurance) basis and cleanliness as well. That was a good question. Sparked a lot of conversation.
 

Roslyn

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Maybe he is like me. I have the same question. I happen to like to keep my vehicles garaged. I take it you don't have turkey vultures and condors flying around launching shit bombs on everything below? We do. We used to have pterodactyls too until I shot the last one. It fell out of the sky into the neighbor's yard and they never forgave me. Another point, is that insurance is less for garaged vehicles, so yes, how big of a garage do I need is a legitimate question. Leave your CT out if you wish. Here windstorms knock down trees as well. Doubt your CT will be impervious to a downed tree, especially a big one. If my garage is too small, I'll just remember back in my Boy Scout days as a Tender Foot. They'd send us around to other campsites looking for bacon stretchers and left-handed smoke shifters, right before we'd get ready for the snipe hunt, so I'll be prepared. I'll just find me a good old fashioned garage stretcher.
I imagine like everything else, there will be a good, better, and a best. Makes sense. Unimotor-good. Dual motor-better. Trimotor-best. Makes perfect sense to me! But here, garaging your CT makes perfect sense from both a monetary (insurance) basis and cleanliness as well. That was a good question. Sparked a lot of conversation.
For better or for worse, the rate of CO suicide seems to be lower in depressed rural areas. Not many people w/garages, or even cars .... We don't have condors and vultures; we have eagles and falcons. There is a kind of dove that seems to have moved north. Its gentle cooing is soothing, until you realize that you're parked right below the power line they're cooing from .... Better to avoid overhead bird groups. Somehow, though, it seems that the stainless steel chosen for SpaceX might withstand a bit of birdshit. Not having to worry about paintjobs and dents; ease of maintenance. (Right now, my windshields are scarcely legal from gravel chips, but I'm not going to replace it until spring ...) There surely be issues involving insurance. I hope and expect that Tesla insurance would provide coverage on the real-world needs. So far, I've not had the pleasure of owning a car that deserved more than public liability insurance ... A few years ago, there was a windstorm of historic proportions that took out all but the sturdiest trees. (Knocked off about half of my old maple tree.) It wouldn't surprise me a bit if Cybertrucks are better-engineered to withstand blows from above. Yes, my criteria are odd. But keep in mind, too, that most people over 80 (many boomers) lose their licenses if they can't see well enough. Wouldn't surprise me if auto-drive could make a real difference for some people. As it is, Tesla auto-drive proves 10x the safety than other cars. I've never been a very good driver ....
 
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Luke42

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Higher humidity, OTOH, is an advantage (unless you are those hapless pilots at SFO) as it renders air less dense thus reducing drag (and as those poor blokes discovered, lift).
Pilot here.

For takeoffs and landings, you want high-density air:
Dense air makes the takeoff/landing slower, and increases engine power -- which mean you can climb more steeply. Denser air makes the runway "longer", when compared to the aircraft's performance. Denser air means safer takeoffs and landings.

For fast/efficient en route travel, though, thin (low density) air reduces drag. Flying in thin air reduces slow-flight-safety and available-engine-power for faster en route travel.

You can always get into thin air by climbing. That's what the jet guys do, and their planes are built for it. They just light the fire-breathers and aim for the stratosphere:
 

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