cvalue13

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Just a note here. You DO need SOMETHING to get the tailgate from the vertical position and to start down. Motor, spring, piston, whatever. But the first few inches need "a push" to start using gravity. The only way this works "gravity only" is if the tailgate is locked in a non-vertical position. Maybe 80 degrees or so...
past not involving a motor, the details of soft open tailgates didn’t seem too relevant

But if we’re on the topic: they need surprisingly little more than a small levered latch that when opening (remotely or by electronic button) pushes the tailgate latch ever so slightly rearward - the rest is done by gravity from the mass distributed *within* the tailgate just so (eg heavy towards the outside, light towards the bed side). From there the shock does the work.

the only thing ‘motorized’ is the electronics of the remote latch.

but doors remotely unlatch/lock, and we don’t call them ‘motorized doors’
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PilotPete

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past not involving a motor, the details of soft open tailgates didn’t seem too relevant

But if we’re on the topic: they need surprisingly little more than a small levered latch that when opening (remotely or by electronic button) pushes the tailgate latch ever so slightly rearward - the rest is done by gravity from the mass distributed *within* the tailgate just so (eg heavy towards the outside, light towards the bed side). From there the shock does the work.

the only thing ‘motorized’ is the electronics of the remote latch.

but doors remotely unlatch/lock, and we don’t call them ‘motorized doors’
Like I said, "Motor, springs, piston, whatever..." I wasn't trying to say they had to be called anything. Just pointing out "something" has to start the movement. Again, if the gate is heavier on the outside, and NOT completely vertical, say 85-ish degrees, then it probably would fall on its own.
 

cvalue13

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Like I said, "Motor, springs, piston, whatever..." I wasn't trying to say they had to be called anything. Just pointing out "something" has to start the movement. Again, if the gate is heavier on the outside, and NOT completely vertical, say 85-ish degrees, then it probably would fall on its own.
less relevant that the exterior package of the gate itself is not vertical, as it is that the hinge is sufficiently forward of the mass.

and in the case of the CT, the mass being the SS skin (yellow), it is sufficiently forward if the hinge (red), especially given the rearward slanting profile of the tailgate (white). Tiniest nudge from the latch action and it’s on its way down … unless you’re parked facing down a hill

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PilotPete

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less relevant that the exterior package of the gate itself is not vertical, as it is that the hinge is sufficiently forward of the mass.

and in the case of the CT, the mass being the SS skin (yellow), it is sufficiently forward if the hinge (red), especially given the rearward slanting profile of the tailgate (white). Tiniest nudge from the latch action and it’s on its way down … unless you’re parked facing down a hill

ECDAE8BE-289F-40F9-974D-758268360E86.jpeg
That's what I was trying to say.
 

FutureBoy

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past not involving a motor, the details of soft open tailgates didn’t seem too relevant

But if we’re on the topic: they need surprisingly little more than a small levered latch that when opening (remotely or by electronic button) pushes the tailgate latch ever so slightly rearward - the rest is done by gravity from the mass distributed *within* the tailgate just so (eg heavy towards the outside, light towards the bed side). From there the shock does the work.

the only thing ‘motorized’ is the electronics of the remote latch.

but doors remotely unlatch/lock, and we don’t call them ‘motorized doors’
I wouldn't be surprised if they used the same electronic latch mechanism as the side doors for this.
The solenoid actually pushes out the door so you can put your hand behind it to open it further.
 

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anionic1

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Yup, my Ridgeline has about almost a two foot cavity. The cool thing about it is the tailgate can open two ways, opens down like as shown but also hinged from the left side for easier access to the sub truck .
Watching the guy lean over the tailgate to access that storage area hurt my back.
 

anionic1

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We have a patch kit in our Model Ys and have had two flats in two years. It could be my imagination, but the high pressure, high efficiency tires seem to pick up nails and road debris easier than our previous vehicles.

In the first case, debris blew a half inch hole in the tread, which required a 3 hour wait for a tow truck to bring us 1.5 miles back to our house. In the second case, the nail was in the shoulder and it wasn't safe to patch. 4 hour wait at an out of town tire shop that ruined our plans, damaged our white seats, and charged us a fortune.

A proper full sized spare is worth it's weight in gold, regardless of how people intend to use their vehicle.
I agree. People have gotten to AAA spoiled. Either way not having a spare on a truck is dumb.
 

anionic1

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Huh? You want a motor to close the tailgate? :rolleyes:

If you have never owned a pickup before, I guess you will have to trust me when I tell you that would be more trouble/expense/weight/complexity than it's worth.

It's dead easy to flip it up into a closed position.
I agree with you. I do all my own vehicle maintenance and see first hand how complicated stuff equals more failures. We are getting too soft with all this automated stuff. I will happily close my own tailgate. Motors have a cycle life orders of magnitude shorter that a good old hinge. I have powered doors on my wife’s minivan and love them because my kids are slow at getting in the car and they can get in the car and out by themselves with the motor doing the work. One of my favorite things about trucks is slamming that tailgate knowing it can take it after I loaded a couple thousand pounds of wood in the back. I don’t want to have to think about some $1500 motor that might get damaged.
 

Crissa

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A motor controlled closure always closes with the same force. Whereas a human might not close it right, slam it, put the force at a weird angle.

Motors might actually increase the reliability in some cases.

-Crissa
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