Eight Foot Bed on Cybertruck

Eight Foot Bed On Cybertruck?


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Mini2nut

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The average buyer wants to be able to garage their CT. Tesla listened and hence the minor revision before production.

An 8’ bed would look ugly IMO, I don’t see it happening. A 6 1/2’ foot bed is the perfect length. Simply fold the bed down for longer items such as plywood, drywall sheets, etc.





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cybertrucktruckguy

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Well I hope you
Hi Todd, if you haven’t already, take a look at the video a professor at a UK Uni that analyses the Cybertruck design, I believe quite well.

I don’t believe a bed change requires a lot of re-engineering at all.

Basically steel plates that are welded in place at the back of the truck are simply sized appropriately, for the desired bed length and then welded in place.

Calculations beforehand determine the (Stainless Steel plate) sizing / reinforcing and the load capacity for a given bed length.


A different bed length does introduce a variation, which means the build process is not as absolutely simple, but it is still quite a small variation that returns exponential value and revenue as over 90% of the existing process and parts are leveraged, of the primary product stream.

This is extremely lucrative and simple, and virtually negligibly cheap for Tesla.
Especially given Munro's assessment to set up Cybertruck production in the first place.

The question is which bed length variation after 6.5ft to do first ?
I'd suggest its going to be a Shortbed, (~ 62" ), given the smaller Cybertruck Elon has confirmed will be 73" wide and they're currently working on. And the statement on the order page for international markets also confirms it.
Well I hope you're right and I'm wrong. I have watched that video multiple times. I think it's the best one out there on the structure of the CT and I've contemplated reaching out to him to do an interview. Good stuff.
 
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Delusional

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Trucks don't have four doors.
LOSE THE REAR DOORS AND SEATS, then you got plenty of room for a long bed.

I swear to dawg that I'm ripping the rear seats out of mine and making a racking system to fit the space..
 
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thejohnllama

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How about losing the rear seats and doors and raising the roofline into a Cybervan with a flat 10 foot bed. You know, like a standard Sprinter 2500.
Sliding Doors on Cybertruck!
 

rr6013

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Real worksites drop bunks of plywood and drywall on-site with forklift delivery or crane. The real world demand for 8'-0" bed length in a pickup originates in " Mine is bigger" toy comparison and the industries that cater to them (i.e. RV, ATV, etc...). Overlander self-contained vehicles with research, exploratory or field work would not deploy a single or fleet of CT either.
 
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thejohnllama

thejohnllama

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Real worksites drop bunks of plywood and drywall on-site with forklift delivery or crane. The real world demand for 8'-0" bed length in a pickup originates in " Mine is bigger" toy comparison and the industries that cater to them (i.e. RV, ATV, etc...). Overlander self-contained vehicles with research, exploratory or field work would not deploy a single or fleet of CT either.
Every contractor I’ve ever worked with hauls 4x8 ply, OSB, hardibacker with a truck or van. Remodel jobs don’t require tons of materials oftentimes
 

Huntsman

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Having a full-length, eight foot bed on Cybertruck would be awesome.

I often use a 6.5’ bed (Silverado) and always wish I had 8’ instead.

Our garage is 24’ deep, so extra length would be okay 👌
In 40 years of driving pickups I’ve had one 6 1/2 bed and regretted it. My wife wanted it so she could drive it - never did. Yes, they are harder to park, I’ve gotten two tickets for exceeding parking space length (Extended cab 8’ bed) While I am an 8’ bed guy, I’m okay with this one being 6 1/2. My days of Sheetrock and 3/4” plywood are waning. My current Ford cost me an extra $4000 for the extended frame, hindsight I’d rather spend $4000 and own an enclosed 12’ utility trailer for the long loads -they just aren’t that often.
 

Pappy

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My F250 had an 8-ft. bed where I backed under my slide-in camper and off I went to the mountains. That rig was able to get me in places that others could not. Just recently purchased the new F150 Hybrid truck with a measly 5.5 foot bed. Thinking about purchasing a toy hauler trailer but now really concerned about not getting to those places I need to without dropping the trailer. Also, pretty sure pulling a trailer will tax the battery more so than the slide in. I’d most definitely would choose an 8-ft. Bed if it were offered.
 

rr6013

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Expect CT to negotiate USFS roads in the West. Trailering toys(loaded) ditto. Gnarly hard scrabble back country access in the West the BLM/ USFS gated, chained and locked by 1978. So I expect CT to get man and machine back into those places open to public access. Exceptions will occur and seasonal limitations apply.

Elon Rule#0 - FORD F-150 can do it – CT will do it

FORD F-250 ups the level of abuse with heavier axels, suspension and frame to withstand 12,500# towing capacity. Cybertruck CT3 spec stated towing capacity 14000#. Cybertruck tow capacity equals that of the F-350==14000#! Tesla should equal or better F-350 spindles, suspension and structural engineering.

Tri-CT will be equal or better traction to conventional staight axel 4x4. Your F-250 8’ bed wheelbase is awesome ride comfort. CT platform will be stiffer. BUT…offroad it should match the FORD F-250’s capability.

Why not?
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Delusional

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I expect the CT to be the best off-road pickup (in stock trim) of all time. Electric motors being able to INSTANTLY provide maximum torque to the wheels, AT ANY SPEED is something that has not yet been experienced by many people. I have heard it's nice. Add the ability to modulate that torque just as quickly, providing maximum torque while avoiding loss of traction. Next, the air suspension is simultaneously the lowest and highest (stock) suspension on the market, it has the ability to raise and lower wheels individually on command.(automatically?) And then... the bottom of the vehicle is a simple flat sheet. ...just don't poke the batteries.
All these things are also very nice on-road.

Off-road, the CT will be a paradigm shift. The only question is how far behind the others will be. I think that electric competitors will not be far behind, in this area.

Let me ask you, do Teslas easily get stuck in mud now?
 

HaulingAss

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Drywall comes in sheets. While the most common size is 4 x 8 feet.

I could use a roof rack, but because of the weight, using the bed is easier and safer.

However, extensions braces to the bed would be another possibility.
Huh? I've hauled 4x8' sheetrock both in a 6 1/2' bed and an 8' bed and the 6 1/2' bed is easier. The sheetrock has to be slid all the way forward in case you need to brake suddenly. It's easier to let the tailgate support the last foot and a half because it makes it easier to load and unload.
 
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HaulingAss

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Tri-CT will be equal or better traction to conventional staight axel 4x4. Your F-250 8’ bed wheelbase is awesome ride comfort. CT platform will be stiffer. BUT…offroad it should match the FORD F-250’s capability.
A truck with a suspension that can adjust to whatever load it might have (or not have) is optimum for ride comfort. It won't be stiffer and have lower comfort - it will be more supple.
 

rr6013

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A truck with a suspension that can adjust to whatever load it might have (or not have) is optimum for ride comfort. It won't be stiffer and have lower comfort - it will be more supple.
Agreed. CT suspension dynamically adjusts ride compared to a conventional spring-only suspension on highway. Air-over-spring is more supple, especially the lower is vehicle ride height.

Supple. As in smooth? IDK. I would not choose to use the word “supple“ in the Colorado Forest Service road, driil road and logging trail to describe CT ride handling off highway. CT‘s air suspension I am won’t to confuse with Semi tractor Air-Ride suspension seen floating on highways. I’d love it were true, Dynamically supple and AI controlled body roll at 16” ride height for CT. But I’m steeling my expectation for it to be more firm, Static-stiff and mechanically reactive(read quicker rebound) at 16” ride height trailering – no miracles.

Supple. As in ability to articulate offroad? Not so much, either. The F-250 3 point straight axel is going to provide a greater degree of freedom with body-on-frame flex contributing twist enabling a FORD to keep wheel traction down to the ground differently, longer offroad than AWD.

CT AWD is going to 4x3-wheel often putting daylight under a fourth wheel. Loaded with trailer that transfers weight and traction to 3 wheels. That translates to pucker, my word. I’m sufficiently impressed with AWD and CT 16” ground clearance to submit that pucker is just another experience we all get used to using. AWD is going places 4x4 used to rule. CT is the point of that spear.

Cybertruck is so stiff(missing voabulary apology) that it will sky wheels off the ground, using AWD three-wheel traction control. Its bluesky in the windshield time when a front tire lifts. Or tippy-canoo feeling when a rear tire raises up off the ground. Where conventional frame F-250 flex enables four-wheel ground contact with 4x4 over the same ground is maintained for the most part and lifts a wheel much less than AWD.

Even with that, in the trailering case, CT AWD can and should haul trailer over USFS roads. AWD will fail differently than 4x4 fails at obstacles, fields of large diameter rock (~10”+) and severe off camber grade (i.e. /-sloped) which ICE articulates a little better and negotiates differently with a trailer attached.

Lodgepole cuts I’ve made in UT Uintas get back in off FS road where you have your pucker factor high getting out loaded with trailer. CO I’ve only 4x4 over abandoned rail bed and mapped trail. All steep solid rock under wheel, snow and crazy drop-out beauty. Desert sand, rock fields are problematic at grade for 4x4 and AWD, alike, with a trailer if not impassible. BUT it’d make for one hell of a Cybertruck tip’o the spear commercial. I’d love to set that up and shoot! I have the exact location in Springtime for that challenge.
 

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