Jhodgesatmb

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1616773501093.png

The Mustang Mach - E shows a button to open the door.
Again I have some concerns about eliminating handles all together in cold climates. I can tell you that our vehicles are often covered in snow and ice. I can see these electronic sensors being problematic in extreme weather. I also have concerns with the elimination of mirrors and using strictly cameras. I can tell you my back up camera is often useless with road salt, spray, dirt, snow, and ice.
I was backing up on my long, bush-lined driveway yesterday. It faces west and it was nearing sunset. I generally use my side mirrors to do this but it was useless due to the glare. Sadly, so we’re the backup cameras on the Model 3. I know this has nothing to do with winter climates, but does address the mirror comment. I have as much issue with my mirrors getting dirty, or wet, and becoming more or less disfunctional than I generally have with the cameras.





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BillyGee

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Here's a fun cyberpunk opening mechanism...... and I would like to believe they looked at this option:
Pneumatic latch system pulled from the onboard air compressor.

You'd have far fewer parts. Mainly just an air line going to each door and a short travel pneumatic piston.
For ice, the truck could just keep upping the PSI until the door popped open through the ice.

As an added cyberpunk aesthetic, the would be a short hiss each time it popped open. Dunno if it would get annoying, guess it would depend on how loud it was.
This sounds cool, but as someone who works with air systems for industry it sounds awful to work on and fix. Even a central tire inflation system would be nightmarish.
 

Cyberman

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... again it's not physically apart of me so, not every time. I can lose it, break it, have it stolen or battery could die, kids could have it/hidden it. Unless there is a backup way to get inside, face it there will be times we run into these issues and I feel for being 21st century tech that it would be annoying A.F.
I'm sure there will be a backup plan, but keys are not physically a part of you either. You can lose them too, or your fob, it can break, battery die, kids hiding 'em. Just sayin'.
 

Cyberman

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You have no idea how much I want this to be true so I can freak out everyone at the lake by driving straight into it at the boat ramp.
As much as I like the concept too, keep in mind the last car that turned into a boat (namely, the Amphicar) was a road vehicle and a boat, that did neither very well. Look for me... on land
 

Delusional

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I don't think people realize how having three-eighths inch thick steel changes things. It's a completely different animal than the tin can sheet metal you're used to seeing. Almost every time I read this forum, I see a place where I'd like to make this distinction.

If your door gets frozen you simply get a small board, place it against the steel, then bash it with a small sledgehammer a few times. That will break it free, except in the most egregious situations.


Quoting "Speach" from page 8.
" they dictate any vehicle inside certain areas of the plant must have the doors unlocked and the "keys in the ignition." If you don't, they can relocate your vehicle in a manner less than pleasing"

This is why you don't park in front of fire hydrants. If there is a fire, the firemen will be sure to break something as they push it out of the way. And your insurance will not pay for the damage if they find out what you did. I've seen this happen on several occasions.
 

ScoobyDoo

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This sounds cool, but as someone who works with air systems for industry it sounds awful to work on and fix. Even a central tire inflation system would be nightmarish.
I hear you, I'm hoping they don't put in central tire inflation for that same reason. I'd rather that cost be put somewhere else.
In reference to the doors, I just noticed everyone talking about Ice seizing up their doors and thought to myself hmmm without door handles where is there a store of potential energy on board that could ramp up as needed to break the door loose of hinderances without needing to put oversized components in the door for those few days where the truck is iced over. So pneumatic actuators came to mind.
Out of curiosity what are the issues you run into working on pneumatic systems? I'm a mechanical/robotics engineer but have never worked with pneumatic systems directly. So just incase I'm tasked with designing a pneumatic system in the future, I'll know what to take in to account to try and prevent said nightmares you've had to deal with. :)
 

Dids

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I don't disagree that I was being a smart ass. But I've seen a handful of people here say they have first hand experience struggling to get in their vehicles due to ice and then people who haven't experienced it say it must not be true.

That's like telling someone it's not possible for them to stub their toe on their own coffee table just because you don't have one.

Lets assume it's as cold in Canada as you're claiming it is. I believe you. I also believe that if it's consistently below freezing, then you don't have standing water that turns to ice. You have to have temperature swings warm enough to melt snow and cold enough to freeze it again.

Where I'm from, it's a regular occurrence to get 6" of snow in the morning, then have half of it melt in the afternoon and settle in all the nooks and crannies of your car, and then have it all freeze again at night.

If it's so cold in Canada that this doesn't happen, great. But if you can't understand that this is not a problem for the coldest climate but more of a problem for climates with larger temperature swings, then that's fine. But I don't have the desire to argue with you about it any longer.

And yes, I've got remote starters on every single vehicle I've ever owned. They might work great for the snow on your car, not the ice on mine.
Seems a simple resistive wire heater inside the rubber seal would heat the seal in about 1 min and be a lot better than an ice breaker actuator. Also cheaper.
 

Ramojarocho

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Cant wait for winter 2021 here in Wisconsin🥶❄
 

LoPro

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My spouse said 'good! That sounds cheaper. Wait, I don't have to have my phone on all the time, do I?' so I ran throw the keycard and the other options and she was like, 'wait, you're telling me too many things... al these car things I don't care about... doesn't it just have a key fob?' so... she can have the key fob ^-^

-Crissa
Do you think it comes with a key fob? My Model 3 didn’t. That said, having Bluetooth proximity as the key (aka:Tesla app) is so transparent and convenient. Have installed a similar Bluetooth proximity solution on the house and cabin front door. So now my phone is all my keys, all debit and credit cards are in the NFC phone wallet, and we also got an official driving license app a couple of years ago here. I only leave home with the phone (and have backup phone linked to same accounts at home if anyone wonders). Also my wife can remotely open doors and start the Tesla if I’m unable somehow.

EDIT: Obviously as a Scandinavian I don’t leave home without a box of snus pouches in my pocket too. But that’s it!
 
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BillyGee

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Out of curiosity what are the issues you run into working on pneumatic systems? I'm a mechanical/robotics engineer but have never worked with pneumatic systems directly. So just incase I'm tasked with designing a pneumatic system in the future, I'll know what to take in to account to try and prevent said nightmares you've had to deal with. :)
I've worked on bottling lines and laser carving machines and the biggest problem is always leaks. They leak, no matter what, all the time. Multiple times a week I'd need to replaced a small hose somewhere on the bottling line and for the laser systems it was the same story. Even worse than that was how many manidolds and sensors were associated and usually one of them whining would shut the whole thing down. Errors and leaks, all day every day... And these were kept inside.

Both of these machines were in the million dollar ballpark too.
 

Firetruck41

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I've worked on bottling lines and laser carving machines and the biggest problem is always leaks. They leak, no matter what, all the time. Multiple times a week I'd need to replaced a small hose somewhere on the bottling line and for the laser systems it was the same story. Even worse than that was how many manidolds and sensors were associated and usually one of them whining would shut the whole thing down. Errors and leaks, all day every day... And these were kept inside.

Both of these machines were in the million dollar ballpark too.
I think some cars, maybe Volvos from the 70s or 80s had air actuated door locks that were unreliable. Personally I would much prefer a electric servo motor, to miles of air tubing.:)
 

Cybercarlson

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In 1996 I spent some time in Chicago.
A freind of mine (driving Ford Pickup or 740 Volvo always) showed me his garage.....
It had a powerfull gasheater inside.
In Germany you did not heat your garage (if you had one) Thus I was a bit surprised.
He told me it was because of the harsh winters in his area and therefore very common.

I am sure CT owners with freezing issues will find a high tech solution.
Or just use a aftermarket car/ truckcover.😉
 

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