Cyberman

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Would the crash data be accurate on trucks made by hand instead of by the production process? Seems like for accurate crash testing they would have to pluck a few random samples from the line. Could be a valid thing to make a few vehicles to validate their construction process and see if there are any obvious things to correct before building up and automating the production line.
Valid argument
 

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The Semi has a 500-mile range with a fully-loaded trailer. I believe that the CT range will be based on at least some of the cargo or towing capacity ‘because’ it is intended as a work vehicle. So both of these vehicles would have higher ranges if less loaded. And that is without changing the batteries or truck at all.
This is not how the EPA calculates range
 

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Would the crash data be accurate on trucks made by hand instead of by the production process? Seems like for accurate crash testing they would have to pluck a few random samples from the line. Could be a valid thing to make a few vehicles to validate their construction process and see if there are any obvious things to correct before building up and automating the production line.
If they are built using the same techniques, they should be. For example if the difference is hand assembled versus robot assembled, they should be the same. But in retrospect, it’s pretty unlikely they would use them for this.
 


Jhodgesatmb

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I'm curious whether the truck would hold together without the exoskeleton. I would like to see a schematic of the cybertruck showing the internal parts and the exoskeleton as separate parts... I am curious how they join together also. I suppose that drawing must exist but I haven't seen it.

I guess the stamping of the steel is actually far easier than the gigacasting part and they are probably ready to do the exoskeleton before they will be ready to gigacast the internal parts. very curious to see all this.

I'm pretty sure it's confirmed they will have two gigacasting machines, one of which is now on site (although not I believe installed yet) and the other of which was photographed at its factory, is now either in transit or in testing, and probably will not be fully installed for several months.
I do not know whether even the GA Model Y would hold together without the unibody components. They are all brought together in the machine shop and welded/attached at the same time as a BIW. I suspect the same will be true with the Cybertruck.

When you say "gigacast the internal parts" I am assuming that you are referring to the front and rear castings that the drives and suspension will be mounted to. It is unlikely that any other parts would be gigacast.

No one has any knowledge of a 9K-ton gigapress having arrived at (or installed) at GigaAustin, so it is probably not a good idea to talk as though it is there until there is some documented (video) proof. It was 'thought' (with good reason) that some large (heavy) equipment related to the 9K had arrived at the Port of Houston, and intended for Tesla, but it was never seen on site. The second 9K-ton gigapress, if it is for Tesla, is still being assembled at IDRA as far as anyone knows. Given how long it has been since IDRA announced that the first 9K-ton gigapress was packaged and shipped out, without it appearing at GigaAustin, there is no way to predict when a second machine might be available. In the past I'd have guessed 1 month transit from Italy to Houston but now, in my frustration, I am inclined to double or triple that time.

No one has seen a schematic of the BIW so we can only guess. That said, it is a pretty good guess that the underside will be primarily comprised of the 2 gigacastings and the structural battery pack. There will almost certainly be some internal parts, such as the door inner sections, etc., that could be stamped and quite unlikely to be 3mm stainless. It isn't so much about whether casting or stamping is easier but whether the machines exist on site. It has never been shared exactly how the exoskeleton will be attached to the underbody but it will likely be a combination of welds and fasteners as with unibody-type designs.
 

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This is not how the EPA calculates range
I wasn't (and wouldn't) talk about EPA range and I don't really care. What I care about is what Tesla tells us the real-world range will be under real-world conditions. When he told us (and then proved) that the real-world (that is, loaded) range of the Semi would be 500 miles, that suggested to me that he might do something similar with the Cybertruck. It was only a hope on my part, especially given the fact that they said 500 miles loaded for the Semi on 'flat' ground and then proceeded to demonstrate a 500-mile range including going up the Grapevine. The Cybertruck was always intended by Tesla to be a work truck so 'real-world' usage would necessarily include some of the stated cargo or towing capacity. Again, just my guessing.
 

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EPA does not calculate range on large trucks at all. These are merely manufacturer claims.
dumb mistake - forgot to equate the CT with an F-350

separately, while manufacturers might sandbag their range/fuel economy numbers a touch for obvious reasons, I can’t fathom any manufacturer providing a “headline” range that assumes any material load. These range numbers are a marketing arms race
 

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dumb mistake - forgot to equate the CT with an F-350

separately, while manufacturers might sandbag their range/fuel economy numbers a touch for obvious reasons, I can’t fathom any manufacturer providing a “headline” range that assumes any material load. These range numbers are a marketing arms race
Ford made the opposite mistake.

They released an extended range numbers for their higher models and adding higher prices for them.

Then when the units were out, costumers and reviewers started finding out a huge drop in range and battery drain when pulling a trailer, climbing a hill and driving with outside low temperatures and snow.
 

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Why are the tri-motor specs a big dream? Or is it a dream to have these specs for a dual trim, which would definitely be a big dream.
I don’t believe the 3 motor will ever be produced. My point was I was hoping for the range to turn out to be while towing.
 


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I do not know whether even the GA Model Y would hold together without the unibody components. They are all brought together in the machine shop and welded/attached at the same time as a BIW. I suspect the same will be true with the Cybertruck.

When you say "gigacast the internal parts" I am assuming that you are referring to the front and rear castings that the drives and suspension will be mounted to. It is unlikely that any other parts would be gigacast.

No one has any knowledge of a 9K-ton gigapress having arrived at (or installed) at GigaAustin, so it is probably not a good idea to talk as though it is there until there is some documented (video) proof. It was 'thought' (with good reason) that some large (heavy) equipment related to the 9K had arrived at the Port of Houston, and intended for Tesla, but it was never seen on site. The second 9K-ton gigapress, if it is for Tesla, is still being assembled at IDRA as far as anyone knows. Given how long it has been since IDRA announced that the first 9K-ton gigapress was packaged and shipped out, without it appearing at GigaAustin, there is no way to predict when a second machine might be available. In the past I'd have guessed 1 month transit from Italy to Houston but now, in my frustration, I am inclined to double or triple that time.

No one has seen a schematic of the BIW so we can only guess. That said, it is a pretty good guess that the underside will be primarily comprised of the 2 gigacastings and the structural battery pack. There will almost certainly be some internal parts, such as the door inner sections, etc., that could be stamped and quite unlikely to be 3mm stainless. It isn't so much about whether casting or stamping is easier but whether the machines exist on site. It has never been shared exactly how the exoskeleton will be attached to the underbody but it will likely be a combination of welds and fasteners as with unibody-type designs.
I meant that since the exoskeleton provides the unifying strength I would think potentially the cybertruck would fall apart under its own weight without it. Yeah I meant the front and rear castings when I said internal parts, but I also meant all the rest, seats and so on. What I was getting at was I was trying to understand how Tesla could put anything together and I assumed the exoskeleton was the part they couldn't do yet. Afterwards I realized that the castings are actually the hard part that Tesla can't make yet because they don't have the gigapresses ready, and they can probably make the exoskeleton now. Thanks... I didn't know the gigapress had not yet been seen at the Austin factory. I thought it was there.

Unless Tesla wants to refine the castings before they finalize the molds for them I don't know why they would attempt to build cybertrucks by hand.

Anyway obviously they can still make a version of the entire truck now since they have built several prototypes. And maybe by doing so they will be able to refine their production process.
 

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Would the crash data be accurate on trucks made by hand instead of by the production process? Seems like for accurate crash testing they would have to pluck a few random samples from the line. Could be a valid thing to make a few vehicles to validate their construction process and see if there are any obvious things to correct before building up and automating the production line.
That would be better, yes.

But not how the regulation is written.

-Crissa
 

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'By Hand', would also serve to prove robot settings in lieu of the casting.

Maybe as a contingency... Or even to keep as a separate low volume line for highly customized versions.. Army, Security.. etc.
 

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If they are built using the same techniques, they should be. For example if the difference is hand assembled versus robot assembled, they should be the same. But in retrospect, it’s pretty unlikely they would use them for this.
A hand build, in this case, is unlikely to have the giga casting, which'll skew the results substantially.
 

Crissa

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A hand build, in this case, is unlikely to have the giga casting, which'll skew the results substantially.
No, the gigacasting is just a cheaper method for making the part; it'll be slightly heavier if you make it otherwise, from more pieces, but just as strong.

-Crissa

 

 
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